Courses

Spring 2019 - Romance Languages Undergraduate and Graduate Courses

Subject to change. Please refer to InsideND for the most up-to-date, accurate information.

LLRO 13186-01- University Seminar: The View from Europe
TR 11:00-12:15
C. Leavett

In this seminar you will investigate how Europeans have seen, understood, and portrayed America from the fifteenth-century voyages of discovery until the present day. Engaging with a diverse array of perspectives and authors—Columbus, Verrazzano, and Vespucci; Arendt, Brecht, and Marx; Calvino, Gramsci, and Pavese; de Tocqueville, de Beauvoir, and Sartre; Forster, Trollope, and Woolf—you will reflect on the enduring myths of America that continue to shape our understanding of the New World.  Conducting an investigation across a wide variety of texts and genres—letters and travelogues; essays and novels; films and popular songs—you will explore the formation of American identities from without but also from within. Confronting the big questions and the major controversies—about democracy, diversity, equality, liberty, and prosperity—you will evaluate how others understand America, and the way Americans understand themselves.

LLRO 13186-02- University Seminar: On Interpretation: The Art of Caressing Art
TR 9:30-10:45
L. MacKenzie

In this seminar, our truck will be with “texts” from various registers of art—for example, songs by Bob Dylan, Leonard Cohen; films by Martin Scorsese; poems by Baudelaire, Rimbaud and by those still at their craft, an opera by Bizet or Mozart. This variety of sources is chosen with one purpose in mind: to encourage techniques of reading from the inside of the text outward. To this end, our interest is more on the how than on the what. In other words, how do we go about finding the seam, the portal through which to enter a text. Written work will be publicly scrutinized in the hopes of also cultivating the fine, difficult and all too often lost art of self-critique. Students under the impression that they “can’t” do textual analysis are especially welcome, as, of course, are those for whom literature and the arts are already a source of joy and an engine of growth.

LLRO 13186-03 - Tasty Words: Food and Eating in Latin American Literature & Cultures
TR 11:00-12:15
V. Miseres

Literature, as any other aesthetic manifestation, abounds in images of food and the actions of producing, preparing, craving, eating, sharing, wasting, and digesting it. This seminar explores the many intersections—both real and metaphorical—between food and language in Latin American literature and cultures.  We will study a wide variety of texts, films, and images to stimulate our appetites for theoretical and critical interrogation.  

LLRO 10101-01 – Beginning Quechua I
MWF 9:25-10:15
G. Mamani Ccallaccasi

The principal aims of this beginning-level Quechua Language course are to encourage the development of competency and proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, writing, and to generate cultural understanding. LLRO 10101 is followed by LLRO 10102.

LLRO 10102-01 – Beginning Quechua II
MWF 10:30-11:20
G. Mamani Ccallaccasi

The principal aims of this beginning-level Quechua Language course are to encourage the development of competency and proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, writing, and to generate cultural understanding. LLRO 10102 is followed by 20201.

LLRO 20201-01 - Intermediate Quechua I
MWF 11:30-12:20
G. Mamani Ccallaccasi

An intermediate-level, third-semester college language course with emphasis on and refinement of grammatical competence and oral and written language skills. Class time is dedicated to interactive discussion encouraging the development of language proficiency and generating cultural understanding.

LLRO 20202-01 - Intermediate Quechua II
MWF 8:20-9:10
G. Mamani Ccallaccasi

An intermediate-level, fourth-semester college language course with emphasis on and refinement of grammatical competence and oral and written language skills. Class time is dedicated to interactive discussion encouraging the development of language proficiency and generating cultural understanding.

LLRO 20222-01- - Intermediate Creole II
TR 2:00-3:15
K. Richman

This course is intended for students who have taken one semester of Intermediate Creole Language and Culture. In small-group teaching sessions, students will be prepared for conversational fluency with enhanced reading and writing skills, emphasizing communicative competence as well as grammatical variety and phonetic acumen. Our study of Kreyòl is integrated with an exploration of how the language is tied to Haitian society, culture, economy and politics and history. Evaluation of student achievement and proficiency will be conducted both informally and formally during and at the conclusion of the course. Those looking to develop or improve their language skills are welcome to the class. The program is designed to meet the needs of those who plan to conduct research in Haiti or in the Haitian diaspora, or who intend to work in a volunteer or professional capacity either in Haiti or with Haitians abroad.

CSEM 23101-01 College Seminar: Stories of Love and Death
MW 2:00-3:15
K. Brown

At the core of Western notions of romantic love are stories from Greco-Roman mythology through the contemporary period that relate love to death and suffering. This course will explore the origins of passion in the occidental world through a variety of films (e.g. "Dangerous Liaisons," "Groundhog Day," "Frantz") and literary works, including poems, short stories, plays, and novels, in order to understand more fully the complex relationship between love and death that continues to influence our conception of love.

LLRO 20312-01 - Advance Oral Expression in Creole
W 3:30-4:45
K. Richman

Designed for students interested in developing their comprehension, fluency and pronunciation. This mini-course in Creole offers both informal and structured conversation based on currents events. Topical conversation on politics, society, and culture will be based on authentic materials.

LLRO 30510-01 – The Italian Cityscape
MW 2:00-3:00
A. LoPinto

Italian cinema provides a key documentation of Italy’s rapid urbanization after World War II, a process that deeply transformed the country’s once rural landscape and tranquil lifestyle. A close examination of the history of Italian cinema reveals the real-life urban complexities beneath the superficial, touristic, and romantic imagery often associated with Italy. This course uses film and other media as lenses to examine the various aspects of contemporary society so that we may more fully understand the urban experience in Italy since the end of World War II. Through the study of major and minor films, literary texts, and other media, we will unveil Italy’s contradictory present and trace its future trajectory.  This course is divided into two sections. The first adopts a geographical approach: we will explore some of the most representative Italian cities such as Rome, Milan, Venice, and Naples. In this section, students will assess the culture of Italian cities through their heterogeneous origins from a mix of republics and city-states through unification in 1861, as well as the more recent homogeneous postwar developments. In the second section, the course will address a number of relevant issues in contemporary Italian urban culture, including industrialization, immigration, urban planning, social marginality, race, class, and gender injustices, and the legacies from Italy’s colonial and fascist past. Some of the questions we will pose include: what is unique to the Italian cityscape and its history? What is shared, if anything, among Italian cities? How do recent developments dialogue with the historical built environment? Taught in English.  Crosslist FTT 30510.

LLRO 33000-01 -  Exploring International Economics
M 5:00-6:00
S. Williams

In this special course designed for inquisitive International Economics  Romance Language (IERL) majors, students will attend a number of lectures, panels, and seminars on campus during the semester, with a follow-up discussion for each led by either a visitor or a member of the Economics or Languages faculty. Before each session, students will be expected to complete a short reading assignment. At each follow-up session, the students will submit a 1-2 page summary and analysis of the talk, with a critical question for discussion. The goal is to encourage students to enrich their major experience by participating in the intellectual discussions that occur amongst ND and visiting scholars across the campus, distinguished alumni, and professionals in the field.

LLRO 40116-01 - Dante II
TR 11:00-12:15
C. Moevs

Dante's Comedy is one of the supreme poetic achievements in Western literature. It is a probing synthesis of the entire Western cultural and philosophical tradition that produced it, a radical experiment in poetics and poetic technique, and a profound exploration of Christian spirituality.  Dante I and Dante II are an in-depth study, over two semesters, of the entire Comedy, in its historical, philosophical and literary context. Dante I focuses on the Inferno and the works that precede the Comedy (Vita Nova, Convivio, De vulgari eloquentia); Dante II focuses on the Purgatorio and Paradiso, along with the Monarchia.  Students may take just one of Dante I and II or both, in either order. Lectures and discussion in English; the text will be read in a facing-page translation, so we can refer to the Italian (but knowledge of Italian is not necessary). Counts as an Italian Studies course. Students with Italian have the option of also enrolling in a one-credit pass/fail Languages Across the Curriculum section, which will meet one hour per week to read and discuss selected passages or cantos in Italian.   NOTE: the one-semester lecture course ROIT 40114, Dante’s Divine Comedy: The Christian Universe as Poetry, is often offered in place of Dante I. LIT - Univ. Req. Literature. Cross-listed with ROIT 63116, MI 40553,MI 60553.

LLRO 40548-01-  Italian Cinema Realities of History
TR 12:30-1:45
Z. Baranski

Italian film-making continues to be most highly regarded for the films made by directors, such as Vittorio De Sica, Roberto Rossellini, and Luchino Visconti, who belonged to the Neo-realist movement (1945-53) and who tried to make films that examined the contemporary experiences of ordinary Italians. The films were inspired by the belief that, by presenting a truthful reflection of life in Italy which gave spectators information about the experiences of their fellow citizens, they would lead to greater understanding, and hence to a better society. Such was the impact of Neo-realist cinema on Italian culture in general and on Italian film-making in particular that its influence may be discerned in most films that have been made from the mid 1950s to this day. This state of affairs has led to the assumption that Neo-realism marks a decisive break with Italy’s pre-war past. Yet, even though Neo-realism did constitute, in ideological terms, a clear departure from fascism, its stylistic roots, its sense of the need for commitment, and its faith in the efficacy of a realist aesthetic all establish ties both with Liberal and Fascist Italy. The principal aim of the course is to explore the construction and development of the Italian cinematic realist tradition from the silent era to the early 1970s, although its primary focus is on the period 1934-1966. In particular, the course examines the formal and ideological continuities and differences between Neo-realist films and their silent and fascist predecessors. In a similar way, it analyses Neo-realism’s impact on later film-makers, such as Federico Fellini, Pietro Germi, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Gillo Pontecorvo, Dino Risi, and Francesco Rosi, who attempted to develop new versions of cinematic realism.  Taught in English; counts as an Italian Studies course. Cross-listed with ROIT 40548, FTT 40249.

Graduate

LLRO 61075-01 - Practicum in Spanish
M 2:00-3:15
M. Jancha

This weekly practicum is designed for graduate students who serve as Spanish Teaching Assistants in the Department of Romance Languages. The course focuses on the development of organizational and presentation skills needed to excel as a foreign language teacher. Students carry out micro-teaching projects and collaborate to develop a portfolio of their own activities based upon the principles learned in the course.

LLRO 61076-01 - Practicum in French
TR 3:30-4:45
A. Haileselassie

This weekly practicum is designed for graduate students who serve as Spanish Teaching Assistants in the Department of Romance Languages. The course focuses on the development of organizational and presentation skills needed to excel as a foreign language teacher. Students carry out micro-teaching projects and collaborate to develop a portfolio of their own activities based upon the principles learned in the course.

LLRO 61077-01 - Practicum in Italian
M 1:15-3:15
A. Blad

This course is designed for graduate students in the M.A. program in Italian and is mandatory during their first year of teaching. It complements the theoretical basis for foreign language teaching methodology provided in LLRO and gives students hands-on practice with the organizational tasks and pedagogical procedures that are pertinent to their daily teaching responsibilities.

LLRO 63980-01 Power and Violence
M 3:30-6:15
J. Lund

What are the relations between power and violence? How has this relation been dealt with (or not) in the context of the rise of the liberal nation-form? How have prominent thinkers reflected on this relation? How has the management of power and violence unfolded in modern political practice? And how has the power-violence relation been problematized through art?  This will be a highly conceptual course whose goal will be to review (master?) the modern political, philosophical and aesthetic relations between power and violence.  Authors we plan to study include: Weber, Benjamin, Gandhi, Fanon, Sartre, Mills, Arendt, Guevara, Foucault, Walesa, Galtung, Said, Lasch, Critchley, Bernstein, and case studies around the French Foreign Legion in Latin America, Black Lives Matter, and the Dakota Access Pipeline protests.  The language of instruction for this course is English.  Students will have the choice to write a series of short papers or one long paper.  Interdisciplinary work is encouraged. Taught in english.

Fall 2018 – Romance Languages

Subject to change. Please refer to InsideND for the most up-to-date, accurate information.

LLRO 13186-01 - University Seminar: On Interpretation: The Art of Caressing Art
TR 2:00-3:15
L. Mackenzie

In this seminar, our truck will be with “texts” from various registers of art—for example, songs by Bob Dylan, Leonard Cohen; films by Martin Scorsese; poems by Baudelaire, Rimbaud and by those still at their craft, an opera by Bizet or Mozart. This variety of sources is chosen with one purpose in mind: to encourage techniques of reading from the inside of the text outward. To this end, our interest is more on the how than on the what. In other words, how do we go about finding the seam, the portal through which to enter a text. Written work will be publicly scrutinized in the hopes of also cultivating the fine, difficult and all too often lost art of self-critique. Students under the impression that they “can’t” do textual analysis are especially welcome, as, of course, are those for whom literature and the arts are already a source of joy and an engine of growth.

LLRO 13186-02 - University Seminar: Imaginary Worlds and Fantastic Travels
TR 2:00-3:15
S. Ferri

This course focuses on the geography of imagined places and made-up fantasy worlds in literature and film. The seminar will be organized around thematic clusters, such as the worlds of the afterlife, utopian and dystopian lands, cities of the future, enchanted gardens and descriptions of unexplored countries. We will see how each theme has developed over time, discuss the reasons and ideas behind each author’s creation, examine the meanings associated with imaginary places, and try to understand what an imaginary place tells us about the real world. Some of the questions that we will raise are: What is the significance of geographical imagination? What are the assumptions and intentions of the authors in developing fantasy worlds? What do imaginary places reveal about the social and historical contexts against which they are set? What is the connection between literary creation and geographical invention? Requirements include one oral presentation, two written assignments, and a final creative project in which each student will contribute to the creation of an imaginary world developed by the class.

LLRO 13186-03 – University Seminar: Brazil in a Global: 21st Century Challenges
TR 12:30-1:45
M. Bahia

In an ever-changing globalized and complex world, Brazil constitutes one of the most significant cases in the Americas to study Politics, Democratic Governance, Human Development, and Civil and Human Rights. Students will develop an in-depth understanding of these key concepts through the study of Brazilian Social, Political and Economic contemporary challenges.

LLRO 13186-04 – University Seminar: Dangerous Reads: Banned US Latina/o Literature
TR 11:00-12:15
M. Moreno

The 2010 ban of Mexican-American Studies classes by the Tucson Unified School District (AZ) provoked a national debate regarding the importance of ethnic studies in our schools. While each side—proponents of the law and defenders of ethnic studies—argued their cases, dozens of literary works were banned from the classrooms. From Shakespeare’s The Tempest to Drown by Pulitzer Prize-winning author Junot Díaz, the list of books “removed” from classrooms reveals that what is at stake is more than just the future of Mexican-American studies. In this course, students will examine the present controversy surrounding HB 2281 and a number of the canonical US Latina/o literature works that were placed on the list of banned books, such as Tomás Rivera’s …and the Earth Did Not Devour Him (Chicano), Sandra Cisnero’s House on Mango Street (Chicana), Junot Díaz’s The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao (Dominican), and US Puerto Rican Martín Espada’s poetry, among other authors of Cuban, Peruvian, Salvadoran, and Guatemalan descent. We will end the semester with a discussion of Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Broadway hit musical Hamilton, a Latino work that has enjoyed an unprecedented reception in the US. This course has an optional CBL/service-learning component that entails tutoring at the local organization La Casa de Amistad once a week for 2 hours. Tutoring/mentoring at La Casa will provide an opportunity for students to deepen their understanding of the issues studied in class in a "real world" context while also fostering stronger ties between Notre Dame and the South Bend community. Previous knowledge of Spanish is not necessary.

LLRO 13186-05 - Human Rights and Social Justice in Latin American Literature and Film
TR 2:00-3:15
T. Anderson

In this course we will focus on the themes of Human Rights and Social Justice in modern Latin American literature and film.  The class will be structured around geographical areas, with approximately equal time divided among the Hispanic Caribbean, the Andean Region and the Amazon, the Southern Cone, and Central America.  For each class students will read literary texts from various genres (novels, stories, poems, plays and essays) and related secondary readings that deal specifically with human rights issues such as torture, poverty, economic exploitation, women’s and children’s rights, racism, religious and cultural oppression, etc.  Students will also be required to watch 10-12 films, all of which will be related to the readings. In this writing-intensive class students will keep a journal to reflect on the readings and the films and will also write several short papers and a final essay.

College Seminar
 

CSEM 23101 – The Question  of Responsibility
MW 12:30-1:45
A. Toumayan

The College Seminar is a unique one-semester course shared by all sophomores majoring in the College of Arts and Letters. The course offers students an introduction to the diversity and distinctive focus of the College of Arts and Letters at the University of Notre Dame. Specific sections of the College Seminar vary in topics and texts (i.e., there will not be a shared reading list across sections), but all feature an interdisciplinary approach, commitment to engaging important questions, employment of major works, and emphasis on the development of oral skills. To learn more about the course and to read the specific course descriptions associated with each section, please visit the College Seminar website at http://csem.nd.edu/.

Undergraduate Courses

LLRO 20201-01 - Intermediate Quechua I
MWF 11:30-12:20
G. Mamani Ccallaccasi

An intermediate-level, third-semester college language course with emphasis on and refinement of grammatical competence and oral and written language skills. Class time is dedicated to interactive discussion encouraging the development of language proficiency and generating cultural understanding.

LLRO 20202-01 - Intermediate Quechua II
MWF 8:20-9:10
G. Mamani Ccallaccasi

An intermediate-level, fourth-semester college language course with emphasis on and refinement of grammatical competence and oral and written language skills. Class time is dedicated to interactive discussion encouraging the development of language proficiency and generating cultural understanding.

LLRO 20212-01 - Intermediate Creole I
TR 2:00-3:15
K. Richman

This course is intended for students who have completed Beginning level Creole or who have attained equivalent competence in the language. In small-group teaching sessions, students will be prepared for conversational fluency with basic reading and writing skills, emphasizing communicative competence as well as grammatical and phonetic techniques. Our study of Kreyòl is closely linked to our exploration of how the language is tied to Caribbean society and culture. Evaluation of student achievement and proficiency will be conducted both informally and formally during and at the conclusion of the course. Those looking to develop or improve their language skills are welcome to the class. The program is designed to meet the needs of those who plan to conduct research in Haiti or in the Haitian diaspora, or who intend to work in a volunteer or professional capacity either in Haiti or with Haitians abroad.

LLRO 20614-01 - Italian American Outreach
MW 2:00-3:15
K. Boyle

At the turn of the twentieth century, the US experienced one of the largest immigration waves in its history. Millions of Italian immigrants who made their way through Ellis Island at the time would leave a permanent imprint on the American landscape and social texture, just as the American experience would shape their identity in the new country. In this course, we will explore the reasons for leaving, the reception upon arriving, and the sometimes paradoxical romanticized view of both their country of origin and arrival. We will examine the desire to assimilate, even when met with resistance and exclusion, and the contributions of Italian Americans to their new home. This semester we will discuss the many cultural aspects that define Italian-Americans while also challenging the stereotypes, which all too often simplify the stories of the Italian American experience.

LLRO 30883-01 – Mexican Immigration
TR 12:30-1:45
K. Richman

This course uses experiential learning in the Mexican community of South Bend in order to understand how Mexican migrants conduct their lives across the vast distances separating South Bend and their homeland. The course begins with readings in social science and fiction about transnationalism, Mexican-U.S. migration and the history and sociology of the local community. Next we learn ethical fieldwork methods in preparation for community research. Students working in two-person teams will gather data on local and transnational households and kin networks, gender relations, political involvement, employment, consumption practices, cultural activities and religious life, working through contacts with social service agencies, the Mexican consulate, and Mexican- or Latino-run media, businesses, food stores, and sports leagues. We will document the innovative adaptations of this migrant community, especially the growth of an ethnic enclave of small businesses that both unite Mexicans as an ethnic group and sustain their ties to their homeland. We intend to compile the research in a volume published by Latino Studies to be given to those who shared their lives with us and to entities that are committed to helping them.

LLRO 40114-01 – Dante’s Divine Comedy: The Christian Universe as Poetry
TR 12:30-1:45
Z. Baranski

Dante is the greatest religious poet of Western culture, and his great epic poem, the Divine Comedy, offers a remarkable and original synthesis of his view of the fundamental relationship between God and humanity. The course offers an introduction to Dante’s Commedia (the title of the poem is Comedy and not Divine Comedy as is commonly believed) by focusing on the first of its three parts, Inferno, while also paying significant attention to its other two parts, Purgatorio and Paradiso. Classes principally concentrate on providing readings of individual cantos. (The course is divided into 4 introductory lectures, 12 classes on Inferno, 7 on Purgatory, and 6 on Paradiso.) At the same time, broader issues central to Dante’s masterpiece will be discussed. In particular, attention will be paid to Dante’s ties to classical and Christian culture, his political views, his ideas on language, his involvement in contemporary intellectual debates, his efforts to use poetry for ethical and religious ends, and his literary experimentation (including his perplexing choice of title for his masterpiece). The course is taught in English. Dante’s poem, too, will be read in English translation, though students with a reading knowledge of Italian are encouraged to read it in both languages. The translation is that found in the annotated bilingual edition by Robert and Jean Hollander (the three-volume—Inferno, Purgatorio, Paradiso—paperback edition is published by Anchor Books, an imprint of Random House). Counts as an Italian Studies course for the Major or Minor. Cross-listed with MI 40565/MI 60552, ROIT 40114.

LLRO 40953-01 – Contemporary Brazil Beyond Stereotype
MW 2:00-3:15
M. Bahia

Images of Brazil often evoke stereotypical images of soccer and carnaval. In this course, we will study these staples of Brazilian culture beyond the shallow confines of stereotypes. History, Sociology, and Cultural Studies will all contribute for an interdisciplinary approach to understand the complexities of Contemporary Brazilian society. (offered in English)

Graduate Courses

LLRO 61075-01 – Practicum in Spanish
M 2:00-3:15
M. Jancha

LLRO 61076-01 – Practicum in French
MW 8:20-9:50
A. Haileselassie

LLRO 61077-01 – Practicum in Italian
M 8:20-9:50
A. Blad

LLRO 63075-01 – Foreign Language Acquisition & Instruction Methods
R 12:30-3:15
A. Blad

An introduction to theories of foreign language acquisition and methods of foreign language instruction related to them, including the direct, cognitive, communicative, and input (natural) approaches. Required of teaching assistants in the department.

 

 

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