Courses

Spring 2018 - Romance Languages Undergraduate and Graduate Courses

Subject to change. Please refer to InsideND for the most up-to-date, accurate information.

LLRO 13186-01- University Seminar: On Interpretation: The Art of Caressing Art
TR 11:00-12:15
L. MacKenzie

In this seminar, our truck will be with “texts” from various registers of art—for example, songs by Bob Dylan, Leonard Cohen; films by Martin Scorsese; poems by Baudelaire, Rimbaud and by those still at their craft, an opera by Bizet or Mozart. This variety of sources is chosen with one purpose in mind: to encourage techniques of reading from the inside of the text outward. To this end, our interest is more on the how than on the what. In other words, how do we go about finding the seam, the portal through which to enter a text. Written work will be publicly scrutinized in the hopes of also cultivating the fine, difficult and all too often lost art of self-critique. Students under the impression that they “can’t” do textual analysis are especially welcome, as, of course, are those for whom literature and the arts are already a source of joy and an engine of growth.

LLRO 13186-25- University Seminar: Dangerous Reads: Banned US Latino /a Literature
TR 9:30-10:45
M.
Moerno
The recent termination of Mexican-American Studies classes by the Tucson Unified School District (AZ) has provoked a national debate regarding the importance of ethnic studies in our schools.  While each side—proponents of the law and defenders of ethnic studies—continue to argue their case, dozens of literary works have been banned in the classrooms.  From Shakespeare’s The Tempest to Junot Díaz’s Drown, the list of books “removed” from classrooms reveals that what is at stake is more than just the future of Mexican-American studies.  In this course, students will examine the present controversy surrounding HB 2281, grassroots movements that have emerged in response to it, and a number of the canonical US Latino/a literature works that were placed on the list of banned books, such as Tomás Rivera’s …and the Earth Did Not Devour Him and Sandra Cisnero’s House on Mango Street. We will also read works by other “banned authors” such as Junot Díaz’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, and Martín Espada’s poetry. We will finish the semester with a discussion of Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Broadway hit Hamilton: An American Musical, which provides a counter-example to other works discussed, and allows us to reflect on the issue of canon formation and how certain works are included or excluded from “American” letters.

CSEM 23102-01 College Seminar:"Money Worries: Status and Value in Literature, Art, and Economic Theory”
MW 11:00-12:15
J. Douthwaite

This course builds on the current fascination with wealth and status to help students develop skills and wisdom vis-à-vis mainstays of capitalist thought. Designed to complement a special exhibit at the Snite Museum of Art ("Money Worries," Jan.-March 2018), the course questions the essential relation between people, goods, and money. We will study novels by Honoré de Balzac, Alain Mabanckou, and Ayn Rand, theories of human motivation by economists Robert J. Shiller and Ha-Joon Chang, as well as popular media portrayals of wealthy and poor people, in order to understand how value is assigned to certain products and social profiles (and not others), and to see how the marketing of elitism depends on socio-political factors to succeed.

LLRO 10118-01- - Beginning II Creole
TR 3:30-4:45
K. Richman

Creole is spoken by an estimated seventeen million people. Creole is spoken on the islands of the Caribbean and the western Indian Ocean that were former or current French colonial possessions and in the countries where many of these former island residents have emigrated, including the United States, Canada, France, Dominican Republic, Bahamas and other parts of Latin America and the Caribbean. Haitians are the largest Creole speech community of approximately eleven and a half million speakers. Creole language courses provide a valuable foundation for Notre Dame faculty, staff and students working to understand and address critical issues related to Haiti and the Francophone world, from language and culture to history and education, from engineering to public health. Creole language and literature are of increasing interest in the dynamic field of Francophone studies. Creole has also become a major area in the field of linguistics, especially in areas of language evolution, sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology. This is a three-credit introductory language course. The instructor will balance both spoken and written Creole as well as exercise reading and listening.  Cross-listed with ANTH 10118, CSLC 10142, AFST 10576, and LLRO 63118

LLRO 20611-01 – Literature and Religion. Reconnection with the Other in Time of Trauma: Literature as the Antidote to Individualism
TR 9:30-10:45
P. Bocchia

This course explores how literature expresses our relationship with the Other as a way to make sense of and face life’s limitations and death. By unsettling our “default” attitudes of individualism, literature’s powerfully communitarian nature reconnects us with the search for the ultimate meaning of reality. By analyzing major figures from both the Italian and the American literary traditions, this course will allow us to think about how literature connects human beings to each other, and fosters civil society. All the texts will be provided in English. Cross-listed with ROIT 20611

LLRO 20613-01 – The Culture of Italian Emigration
TR 2:00-3:15
M. Valmori

Focusing on the Italian American experience, this interdisciplinary course addresses issues of migration and its related themes of cultural conflict/crossings and ethnic identity formation.  The course engages fictional, non-fictional, musical, and visual texts that recount the experience of migration as seen through the eyes of Italian American as well as Italian authors. The general goal will be to critically evaluate the popular images of Italian emigrants in light of their important contribution to hostile societies, and the texts under analysis will shed new light on the perception/construction of Italian national identity.
 

LLRO 33000-01 -  Exploring International Economics
M 5:00-6:00
S. Williams

In this special course designed for inquisitive international economics / romance language majors, students will attend a number of lectures, panels, and seminars on campus during the semester, with a follow-up discussion for each led by either a visitor or a member of the economics or romance languages faculty. Before each session, students will be expected to complete a short reading assignment. At each follow-up session, the students will submit a 1-2 page summary and analysis of the talk, with a critical question for discussion. The goal is to encourage students to enrich their major experience by participating in the intellectual discussions that occur amongst ND and visiting scholars across the campus, distinguished alumni, and professionals in the field.

LLRO 40116-01 -  Dante II
TR 11:00-12:15
C. Moevs

Dante's Comedy is one of the supreme poetic achievements in Western literature. It is a probing synthesis of the entire Western cultural and philosophical tradition that produced it, a radical experiment in poetics and poetic technique, and a profound exploration of Christian spirituality.  Dante I and Dante II are an in-depth study, over two semesters, of the entire Comedy, in its historical, philosophical and literary context.   Dante I focuses on the Inferno and the works that precede the Comedy (Vita Nova, Convivio, De vulgari eloquentia); Dante II focuses on the Purgatorio and Paradiso, along with the Monarchia.  Students may take just one of Dante I and II or both, in either order.   Lectures and discussion in English; the text will be read in a facing-page translation, so we can refer to the Italian (but knowledge of Italian is not necessary).  Counts as an Italian Studies course.  Students with Italian have the option of also enrolling in a one-credit pass/fail Languages Across the Curriculum section, which will meet one hour per week to read and discuss selected passages or cantos in Italian.   NOTE:  the one-semester lecture course ROIT 40114, Dante’s Divine Comedy: The Christian Universe as Poetry, is often offered in place of Dante I. LIT - Univ. Req. Literature. Cross-listed with ROIT 40116, MI 40553,MI 60553.

LLRO 40548-01- -  Italian Cinema Realities of History
TR 12:30-1:45
Z. Baranski

Italian film-making continues to be most highly regarded for the films made by directors, such as Vittorio De Sica, Roberto Rossellini, and Luchino Visconti, who belonged to the Neo-realist movement (1945-53) and who tried to make films that examined the contemporary experiences of ordinary Italians. The films were inspired by the belief that, by presenting a truthful reflection of life in Italy which gave spectators information about the experiences of their fellow citizens, they would lead to greater understanding, and hence to a better society. Such was the impact of Neo-realist cinema on Italian culture in general and on Italian film-making in particular that its influence may be discerned in most films that have been made from the mid 1950s to this day. This state of affairs has led to the assumption that Neo-realism marks a decisive break with Italy’s pre-war past. Yet, even though Neo-realism did constitute, in ideological terms, a clear departure from fascism, its stylistic roots, its sense of the need for commitment, and its faith in the efficacy of a realist aesthetic all establish ties both with Liberal and Fascist Italy. The principal aim of the course is to explore the construction and development of the Italian cinematic realist tradition from the silent era to the early 1970s, although its primary focus is on the period 1934-1966. In particular, the course examines the formal and ideological continuities and differences between Neo-realist films and their silent and fascist predecessors. In a similar way, it analyses Neo-realism’s impact on later film-makers, such as Federico Fellini, Pietro Germi, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Gillo Pontecorvo, Dino Risi, and Francesco Rosi, who attempted to develop new versions of cinematic realism.  Taught in English; counts as an Italian Studies course  Cross-listed with ROIT 40548, FTT 40249.

 

Fall 2017 - Romance Languages Undergraduate and Graduate Courses

Subject to change. Please refer to InsideND for the most up-to-date, accurate information.

LLRO 13186-02 –  University Seminar: On Interpretation: The Art of Caressing Art
TR 2:00-3:15pm
L. MacKenzie

In this seminar, our truck will be with “texts” from various registers of art—for example, songs by Bob Dylan, Leonard Cohen; films by Martin Scorsese; poems by Baudelaire, Rimbaud and by those still at their craft, an opera by Bizet or Mozart. This variety of sources is chosen with one purpose in mind: to encourage techniques of reading from the inside of the text outward. To this end, our interest is more on the how than on the what. In other words, how do we go about finding the seam, the portal through which to enter a text. Written work will be publicly scrutinized in the hopes of also cultivating the fine, difficult and all too often lost art of self-critique. Students under the impression that they “can’t” do textual analysis are especially welcome, as, of course, are those for whom literature and the arts are already a source of joy and an engine of growth.

LLRO 13186-03 – University Seminar: Imaginary Worlds and Fantastic Travels
TR 12:30-1:45pm
S. Ferri

This course focuses on the geography of imagined places and made-up fantasy worlds in literature and film. The seminar will be organized around thematic clusters, such as the worlds of the afterlife, utopian and dystopian lands, cities of the future, enchanted gardens and descriptions of unexplored countries. We will see how each theme has developed over time, discuss the reasons and ideas behind each author’s creation, examine the meanings associated with imaginary places, and try to understand what an imaginary place tells us about the real world. Some of the questions that we will raise are: What is the significance of geographical imagination? What are the assumptions and intentions of the authors in developing fantasy worlds? What do imaginary places reveal about the social and historical contexts against which they are set? What is the connection between literary creation and geographical invention? Requirements include one oral presentation, two written assignments, and a final creative project in which each student will contribute to the creation of an imaginary world developed by the class.

CSEM 23101-23 - Money Worries: Status and Value in Literature, Art, and Economic Theory (College Seminar)
MW 12:30-1:45pm
J. Douthwaite

This course builds on the current fascination with wealth and status to help students develop skills and wisdom vis-à-vis mainstays of capitalist thought. The course questions the essential "rationality" inherent in the relations between people and markets. We will study novels by Honoré de Balzac, Alain Mabanckou, and Ayn Rand, theories of human motivation by economists Robert J. Shiller and Ha-Joon Chang, as well as popular media portrayals of wealthy and poor people, in order to understand how value is assigned to certain products and social profiles (and not others), and to see how the marketing of elitism depends on socio-political factors to succeed.

Undergraduate

LLRO 10112-01 – Beginning Creole
TBD
K. Richman

Creole is spoken by an estimated seventeen million people. Creole is spoken on the islands of the Caribbean and the western Indian Ocean that were former or current French colonial possessions and in the countries where many of these former island residents have emigrated, including the United States, Canada, France, Dominican Republic, Bahamas and other parts of Latin America and the Caribbean. Haitians are the largest Creole speech community of approximately eleven and a half million speakers. Creole language courses provide a valuable foundation for Notre Dame faculty, staff and students working to understand and address critical issues related to Haiti and the Francophone world, from language and culture to history and education, from engineering to public health. Creole language and literature are of increasing interest in the dynamic field of Francophone studies. Creole has also become a major area in the field of linguistics, especially in areas of language evolution, sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology. This is a three-credit introductory language course. The instructor will balance both spoken and written Creole as well as exercise reading and listening.

LLRO 20312-01 – Ad Oral Expression in Creole
TBD
TBD

Designed for students interested in developing their comprehension, fluency and pronunciation. This mini-course in Creole offers both informal and structured conversation based on current events. Topical conversation on politics, society, and culture will be based on authentic materials.

LLRO 20612-01 – Genesis of the Italian –American Identity
MW 2:00-3:15pm
K. Boyle

At the turn of the twentieth century the US experienced one of the largest immigration waves in its history. Millions of Italian immigrants who made their way through Ellis Island at the time would leave a permanent imprint on the American landscape and social texture, just as the American experience would shape their identity. This course explores in an interdisciplinary way the many cultural aspects that define Italian-Americans, including religion, language, family structure and gender roles, traditions and celebrations, cuisine, political and social worldview, and artistic representations. The aim of this course is for students to analyze how these cultural facets created the Italian-American identity. Cross-listed with ROIT 20612.

LLRO 30030-01 - Bilingual/Bicultural Education
MW 
E. Lemrow

Schools across the nation are re-investing in dual language and immersion bilingual education programs.  Benefits of such schooling are not only cognitive in nature, but help build what the American Council for Teachers of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) describes as intercultural competency. In what ways do these programs impact and serve students both of monolingual and bilingual backgrounds? What programmatic and pedagogical structures best impact successful language learning for language learners from both communities? How can bilingual education also be bicultural with commitments to culturally sustaining pedagogies? This course introduces students to important concepts, ideas, and research in bilingual and bicultural education. The first half of the course is dedicated to exploring bilingualism, while the second half focuses on bilingual education.  Important course issues include: 1) definitions and measurements of bilingualism; 2) languages in society; 3) history of bilingual education in America; 4) development and maintenance of bilingualism; 5) effective models of bilingual education; 6) theories and research on second language acquisition and bilingualism; and 7) bilingualism and cognition; 8) bilingualism and biliteracy; 9) bilingualism in the modern world. These and other issues will be explored through contemporary readings and research as well as a community-based research component which will allow students to explore, observe, and further research bilingual programs in action at area schools. This course can count as an advanced elective taught in English for IERL, RLL, ROSP and ROS2 majors.

LLRO 30883-01 – Mexican Immigration: A South Bend Case Study
TR 12:30-1:45pm
K. Richman

Mexican immigrants are the largest immigrant group in South Bend. This course aims to understand and share information about who these new immigrants are, why they have come to the Midwest, and Chicago and South Bend, in particular, and how they are adapting and contributing to South Bend economic and social life. Students will contribute to documentation of the innovative adaptations of this migrant community, especially the growth of an ethnic enclave of small businesses that both unite Mexicans as an ethnic group and sustain their ties to their homelands. Kinship networks, economic relations, political activities and religious practices simultaneously involve Mexicans in home and diaspora locations. Understanding the relationships between Mexicans' immigrant integration and transnational allegiances is a key goal of the course. Cross-listed with ILS 43101

LLRO 40114-01 – Dante’s Divine Comedy: The Christian Universe as Poetry
TR 12:30-1:45pm
Z. Baranski

Dante is the greatest religious poet of Western culture, and his great epic poem, the Divine Comedy, offers a remarkable and original synthesis of his view of the fundamental relationship between God and humanity. The course offers an introduction to Dante’s Commedia (the title of the poem is Comedy and not Divine Comedy as is commonly believed) by focusing on the first of its three parts, Inferno, while also paying significant attention to its other two parts, Purgatorio and Paradiso. Classes principally concentrate on providing readings of individual cantos. (The course is divided into 4 introductory lectures, 12 classes on Inferno, 7 on Purgatory, and 6 on Paradiso.) At the same time, broader issues central to Dante’s masterpiece will be discussed. In particular, attention will be paid to Dante’s ties to classical and Christian culture, his political views, his ideas on language, his involvement in contemporary intellectual debates, his efforts to use poetry for ethical and religious ends, and his literary experimentation (including his perplexing choice of title for his masterpiece). The course is taught in English. Dante’s poem, too, will be read in English translation, though students with a reading knowledge of Italian are encouraged to read it in both languages. The translation is that found in the annotated bilingual edition by Robert and Jean Hollander (the three-volume—Inferno, Purgatorio, Paradiso—paperback edition is published by Anchor Books, an imprint of Random House). Counts as an Italian Studies course for the Major or Minor. Cross list with MI 40565/MI 60552, LLRO 40114.

LLRO 40552-01 – Graphic Wounds: Graphic Novels
TR 3:30-4:45pm
O. Morel

Blue is the Warmest Color is the title of the film that won the 2013 Cannes Festival's Palme d'Or. For the first time, the prize went to the cinematic adaptation of a graphic novel. Graphic novels have demonstrated a tendency to serve as a major source of inspiration for filmmakers. The goal of this class is to analyze how literacy, print technology, the film industry, and developments in narrative art combine to transform the tradition of graphic novels in a changing context. Our approach consists of analyzing how post-9/11 graphic novels depict today's world in an original way, in an innovative genre located at the intersections of several disciplines: journalism, auto-fiction, photographic and cinematic representations. In our examination of the most recent developments of the genre, the texts and films we study include works by Will Eisner alongside Art Spiegelman's In the Shadow of No Tower, Alissa Torres & Sungyoon Choi's American Widow, Sid Jacobson & Ernie Colón's The 9/11 Report: A Graphic Adaptation, Guibert, Lefèvre & Lermercier's The Photographer: Into War-torn Afghanistan, Marjane Satrapi's Persepolis, Joe Sacco's Palestine and Days of Destruction, Days of Revolt, Etienne Davodeau's, The Initiates, and Enki Bilal's The Dormant Beast, among others. Co Requisites: LLRO 40552. Cross-listed with FFT 40252, and AMST 30730.

LLRO 40952 – The Giant of the South: Brazil in the 21st Century
MW 2:00-3:15pm
M. Bahia

What are the new challenges for the Brazilian democracy and human development post-impeachment? What are the current issues in race, religion, class, gender and politics that are shaping the present and the future of the Giant of the South? (offered in English) Cross-listed ROSP 40952, GSC 40520 and AFST 40579.

Graduate

LLRO 61075-01 – Practicum in Spanish
R 8:20-9:50am
M. Jancha

This weekly practicum is designed for graduate students who serve as Spanish Teaching Assistants in the Department of Romance Languages. The course focuses on the development of organizational and presentation skills needed to excel as a foreign language teacher. Students carry out micro-teaching projects and collaborate to develop a portfolio of their own activities based upon the principles learned in the course.

LLRO 61076-01 – Practicum in French
MW 8:20-9:50am
A. Haileselassie

This weekly practicum is designed for graduate students who serve as Spanish Teaching Assistants in the Department of Romance Languages. The course focuses on the development of organizational and presentation skills needed to excel as a foreign language teacher. Students carry out micro-teaching projects and collaborate to develop a portfolio of their own activities based upon the principles learned in the course.

LLRO 61077-01 – Practicum in Italian
M 8:20-9:50am
A. Blad

This course is designed for graduate students in the M.A. program in Italian and is mandatory during their first year of teaching. It complements the theoretical basis for foreign language teaching methodology provided in LLRO and gives students hands-on practice with the organizational tasks and pedagogical procedures that are pertinent to their daily teaching responsibilities.

LLRO 63075-01 – Foreign Acquisition & Instruction Methods (Graded)
R 12:30-3:15pm
A. Blad

An introduction to theories of foreign language acquisition and methods of foreign language instruction related to them, including the direct, cognitive, communicative, and input (natural) approaches. Required of teaching assistants in the department.

LLRO 63213 01 – Religion and Literature in the light of Job
W 12:30-3:15pm
V. Montemaggi

A study of religion and literature through the works of Gregory the Great, Dante, Shakespeare and Primo Levi. Cross-listed PRL 40113, LLRO 40113, THEO 60265, and MI 63585.

 

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