Courses

Spring 2019 - Iberian and Latin American Undergraduate Courses  

Subject to change. Please refer to InsideND for the most up-to-date, accurate information.

Portuguese Undergraduate Courses

ROPO 20202- 01: Intermediate Portuguese II
MWF 11:30-12:20
TBD

This is a continuation of ROPO 20201 but it may be taken separately. ROPO 20202 is a fourth-semester language course designed to develop facility in speaking, reading, and writing at an advanced level. Discussions and writing assignments are based on films as well as on short stories, chronicles and newspaper articles.

ROPO 30810-01 – Brazilian Literature in Dialogue with New Arts and Media
MW 12:30-1:45
M. Bahía

In this course, students will have a broad introduction to the masterpieces of Brazilian Literature, from colonial times to modernismo. Our corpus will include works by great masters such as Gregório de Matos, José de Alencar, Machado de Assis, Clarice Lispector, and Jorge Amado. Furthermore, the close reading of these texts will be enriched by the analysis of contemporary music, graphic novels, TV shows and movies that adapt, reshape, recycle and remediate Brazilian literary classics. Taught in Portuguese.

ROPO 40511-01 – Introduction to Film Analysis through Brazilian Cinema.
MW 2:00-3:15
M. Bahía

Students will be able to improve their argumentative and analytical skills through the study of key issues and concepts in film studies. Film form and narrative, gender, class, stereotypes, the film auteur, cultural industry, violence and social denunciation will be some of the topics explored for the exploration of Brazilian case studies. Special emphasis will be given to the retomada –the rebirth of Brazilian cinema from the mid 1990s on – with in-depth analyses of feature films such as Carlota Joaquina (Carla Camurati, 1995), Central do Brasil (Walter Salles, 1998), CIdade de Deus (Fernando Meirelles, 2002) and Tropa de Elite (José Padilha, 2007); documentary movies such as Edifício Master (Eduardo Coutinho, 2002) and Santiago (João Moreira Salles, 2007) , as well as short movies such as Recife Frio (Kleber Mendonça Filho, 2009) and Eu não Quero Voltar Sozinho (Daniel Ribeiro, 2010). Taught in English. Crosslist FTT 40236

Spanish Undergraduate Courses

ROSP 20460-01/02 – Spanish for Medical Profession
ROSP 20460-01: MWF 12:50-1:40
ROSP 20460-02: MWF 2:00-2:50
M. Coloma

This is an intermediate Spanish level course designed for students interested in any health profession. We will develop medical language skills and cultural competency for health care situations. The course will include practical terminology, a review of hospital settings, multimedia simulations, films, recorded doctor-patient interactions, and current medical events. Spanish is the only language of instruction.

ROSP 20600 - Cultural Conversations and Writing
MWF - Various Times

This is an upper-intermediate cultural conversation and writing course designed to follow the four-semester language sequence and to act as a bridge to more advanced courses. In order to improve oral and writing language skills, this course engages students intellectually by using challenging, authentic materials and focusing on the exchange of ideas. Through the reading, discussion, and analysis of these materials, students will develop more sophisticated oral expression and expository writing as well as critical and abstract thinking skills. Being a content-driven course, topics could include, but are not limited to questions from the domains of politics, history, art, music, literature, film, religion, pop culture, etc. This course may be used as one of the two 20000-level electives for the Spanish major.

ROSP 20600-01: MWF 9:25-10:15
ROSP 20600-04: MWF 11:30-12:20
M. Coloma

This course will use informative and thought-provoking films to focus on the contemporary history, literature, art and culture of Latin America. Supplementary texts and articles will provide background historical events and analysis to enhance the understanding of the circumstances and themes that each of the films address. Activities that promote effective communication of abstract themes with high-intermediate use of grammatical structures will be emphasized. The goal of the course is to improve oral and written communication and the development of new, more complex, vocabulary.

ROSP 20600-02: MWF 9:25-10:15
ROSP 20600-03: MWF 10:30-11:20
ROSP 20600-05: MWF 12:50-1:40
T. Botero

This course has a required Community-Based-Learning (CBL) component in which students engage with the Latino community and will require weekly meetings outside of the classroom working with your community families assigned. An advanced-intermediate culture-based Spanish course, this class serves as a bridge course between our four-semester basic language courses and advanced classes on literature and culture. Through literature, film, current events, and guest speakers, students will develop knowledge about migration issues, family immigration histories, and problems facing our Latino communities in general, and particularly in South Bend with a focus on the immigrant perspective. For the CBL part of the class, students through ethical engagements will work on a collaborative creation and preservation of memory (memory of experiences that shape everyday life and the future of their assigned family). Together through a series of interviews conducted on a weekly basis, they will document the powerful narratives that not only shape memory but signal possibilities of what is to come. Using storytelling techniques, students will work with families to create and record the family histories using a variety of methods that will result in a collaborative book detailing their life and path that has lead them to our community. This course will help create spaces of solidarity, empathy, and communication as legitimate points of departure for the politics of the future for both students and the community. Through this project students actually see the face of immigration in a more personal way, a way that changes their perspective. Required completed ROSP 20202.

ROSP 20810-01: Community-Based Spanish: Language, Culture and Community: Immigration and the Construction of Memory
MW 2:00-3:15
T. Botero

This course has a Community-Based-Learning (CBL) component in which students engage with the Latino community at required weekly meetings outside of the classroom working with assigned community families (Thursdays 5:15-6:15, El Campito). An advanced-intermediate culture-based Spanish course, this class serves as a bridge course between the foursemester language sequence and advanced literature and culture classes. Through literature, film, current events, and guest speakers, students develop knowledge about migration issues, family immigration histories, and problems facing Latino communities generally, and particularly in South Bend with a focus on the immigrant perspective. For the CBL part of the class, students engage ethically to collaboratively create and preserve memory (of experiences that shape everyday life and the future of their assigned family). Through weekly interviews, students document the powerful narratives that not only shape memory but signal possibilities of what is to come. Using storytelling techniques and a variety of methods, students work with families to create and record family histories resulting in a book detailing their life and path that led them to our community. This course helps create spaces of solidarity, empathy, and communication as legitimate points of departure for the politics of the future for both students and community. Through this project, students see the face of immigration in a personal way, one that changes their perspective. Prerequisite: ROSP 20202.

ROSP 20810-02: Community-Based Spanish: Multiple Literacies and Connecting Society, Community, and Self
MW 9:30-10:45
A. Topash-Rios

This fifth semester Community-Based Spanish course bridges the language and literature sequences in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures. “Bridging the Gap” develops and promotes oral and written proficiency as well as cultural awareness through exploration of global, contemporary topics related to literacy development and multiple literacies in international contexts. With our community partner, El Campito Child Development Center, we actively engage the development of pre-literacy skills with the children in the 4’s room. At the same time, Notre Dame students advance their second language skills and dispositions. In addition to class meetings, the class spends one hour per week (Fridays, 9:30-10:30 a.m.) reading to children and engaging them in conversation. Students work with child-partners to author an original storybook using the Story Jumper platform. Through reflective assignments, Notre Dame students describe their growing awareness of the connections between self, community and society as they learn about the challenges faced by El Campito families while they seek to build a better future. Prerequisite: ROSP 20202.

ROSP 30017-01 - Introduction to Translation
MW 2:00-3:15
E. Mangione-Lora

Students will explore translation theory, ethics, preparations, procedures and techniques by means of Monica Baker’s In Other Words: A Course book on Translation. Together with an advanced language text to improve language skills, and selected readings to provide a strong preparation for meaningful interaction with their community partners, the course will provide real-world opportunities for application and feedback for the skills the students develop.  Students will be expected to work with the community partner for 10-12 hours per semester, which typically entails a visit once per week to the partner site. Crosslist ILS 30911

ROSP 30101-01 – Caribbean Diasporas
TR 12:30-1:45
K. Richman

This course examines the development of Creole societies in the French, Spanish, Dutch, and British Caribbean in response to colonialism, slavery, migration, nationalism and, most recently, transnationalism. The recent exodus of as much as 20 percent of Caribbean populations to North America and Europe has afforded the rise of new transnational modes of existence. This course will explore the consciousness and experience of Caribbean diasporas through ethnography and history, religion, literature, music, and culinary arts.

ROSP 30310-01/02/03/04 – Introduction to Hispanic Literature and Cultures
MW 12:30-1:45, MW 2:00-3:15, TR 11:00-12:15, TR 12:30-1:45,
Various Professors

This course is a practical introduction to the analysis and explication of Spanish-language literary texts. The course is designed for students ready to move from 200-level Spanish classes to upper-level literature and survey courses. The goal is to develop students' skills of critical reading, as well as students' ability to articulate judgments, feelings and opinions in Spanish; to establish a point of view and argue it effectively. The premise is that these skills of critical reading will increase the enjoyment and appreciation of fine writing. Some class sessions will be devoted to discussion of techniques and terminology of literary analysis. Most class sessions will involve a close reading and discussion of specific texts selected from the anthology Aproximaciones al estudio de la literatura hispánica, a selection of Hispanic prose, poetry and theater from different regions and periods. Students will also write two or three short analytical essays (3-4 pages) during the semester. Prerequisite: ROSP 20202, 20211, 2021, 20237, 27500 or equivalent.

ROSP 30320-01 – Advanced Grammar and Writing
MWF 12:50-1:40
I. Menes

This course offers a further refinement of Spanish speaking and writing skills. It is designed for students already in the 30000-40000 sequence, or those placed by exam, who want to work on their writing skills, and for students planning to study abroad or those returning from abroad who wish to further improve their proficiency in Spanish. For further information see Undergraduate Coordinator. ROSP 30320 requires permission from the Assistant Chair.

ROSP 30715-01 – Imagined Worlds: Now and Then
TR 12:30-1:45
J. Vitulli

Since its first uses in the Sixteenth Century, the term utopia meant both "good place" and "no place." Thus, the concept carried two different ideas in its own meaning, an ideal society and an unreachable one. In the past years, the concept—as well as its opposite, dystopia—has been applied to explain literary representations of imagined worlds that hold a mirror up to our own “real” world. Analyzing and discussing cultural products that create, depict, and represent invented societies is, without a doubt, a good path to understand and to critique key aspects of this complex world we live in today. Cross-listed with MI 30500

ROSP 30810-01: Early Latin American Literature and Culture
TR 9:30-10:45
V. Miseres

This course is designed to give students a wide scope of readings from colonial times to the 19th century that have shaped Latin America’s social, cultural and literary history.
The main focus of the course is Latin America’s redefinition of itself, its societies and diverse national identities. Departing from Edmundo O’Gorman’s assertion that America was not discovered but invented, we will explore the multiple and diverse definitions of the continent in literary and cultural expressions. We will problematize terms like “Nuevo Mundo”, “América”, “Americano” and “Latin America” from different perspectives that include the first Spanish cronistas, foreign travelers, and Creole intellectuals from several countries, including the voices of women authors that have been traditionally underrepresented in Latin American history. Students will be able to compare literary genres (chronicles, essays, short stories); analyze individual texts, films, and artistic works using appropriate terminology; and engage critically in questions about Latin America’s colonial legacy and nation-building. As we discuss the course material from colonial, independence and post-independence periods, we will also make connections to more current issues about Latin American history, politics, human rights, social activism, and gender roles.

ROSP 30820-01 – Modern Latin-American Literature and Culture
MW 2:00-3:15
M.R. Olivera-Williams

This course provides a panoramic survey of Spanish American literature from roughly 1880 to the present, with attention to principal literary trends and concepts of literary analysis in Spanish. To focus the course, we will be pursuing the problem of modernity as it emerges in the major movements and authors of the long twentieth century, tracing divergent responses to the complex and rapid changes – including industrialization, shifting gender roles, and the emergence of new media such as cinema– of the period. And we will be particularly attuned to non-realist forms of literary expression, especially fantastic literature, as they reemerge consistently in the region throughout the “long” twentieth century and represent an important contribution of Latin American literature to world literature. We will read essays, poetry, short stories, and a short novel by authors such as José Martí, Rubén Darío, Jorge Luis Borges, Juan Rulfo, Rosario Ferré, and others, with an eye towards understanding the social and historical contexts in which the works took shape. The course is designed to expose you to some of the region’s most celebrated and provocative works of literature, as well as help you understand the major challenges and promises Latin America faced during its modern period. It will also hone your skills in analyzing texts in Spanish, as we will practice close reading through a variety of genres and styles. Cross-listed with LAST 30401

ROSP 30864-01 – Borges and the Ethics of Betrayal
MW 9:30-10:45
C. Jauregui

The goals of this class are twofold: 1) an introductory yet focused review of the literary
work of renowned Argentine poet, essayist and writer of short stories Jorge Luis Borges (1899-1986); and 2) the literary interrogation of moral, religious, political, and cultural betrayal through a critical survey of Borges’ work (poetry, essay and short story) and the study of the fluid relation of his writings with 20th century philosophy and cultural theory. This class has a weekly reading requirement of
approximately 100 pages, a writing requirement of 5 pages, and a weekly workload of 5 hours approximately. Participation in class represents half of the final grade.

ROSP 40580-01 – Mexican Cinema
MW 9:30-10:45
J. Lund

This course will introduce the student to modern Mexican film. The trajectory of the course covers a basic canon of essential works from the incipient years of Mexico's so-called "Golden Age" up until the present (roughly 1930 - 2015). Lecture and discussion will be driven by the aesthetic, cultural and political problems and themes invited by the films themselves, which will be the center of the course: no less than fifteen feature films will define our agenda for the semester. Alongside the films we will read two kinds of documents: on the one hand, a selection of film scholarship, dealing with both the specific films and the history of Mexican cinema more generally; on the other hand, a set of essays on Mexican cultural politics relevant to the themes engaged in the cinematic work. Comparative work is encouraged. Language of instruction: Spanish. Readings in Spanish and English, films generally in Spanish with English subtitles.

ROSP 40726-01 – Gabriela Mistral and Her World
MW 3:30-4:45
M.R. Olivera Williams

This course, designed as a seminar for upper-level Spanish students, will consider the poetry of Gabriela Mistral in its historical and cultural context, paying particular attention to the aesthetic evolution of her poetry and to its social and religious aims. Letters and other writings by the Chilean poet will also be discussed. The seminar will be conducted in Spanish.  

ROSP 40771 – Cuba and Puerto Rico: “Two Wings of a Bird”
TR 12:30-1:45
T. Anderson

While she was living in exile in Cuba in the 1890s, Puerto Rican Poet Lola Rodríguez de Tió wrote the following lines, which are among the most iconic in Hispanic Caribbean verse: “Cuba y Puerto Rico son de un pájaro las dos alas, /reciben flores y balas en un mismo corazón...”. At the time these lines were seen as a testament to the similar histories that these two Caribbean islands had developed after some four centuries of Spanish rule, but, as one critic has put it, “they can also be seen as a chilling presage of what was to come after the U.S. won the Spanish American War in 1898 and became a consistent presence in the future of both countries.” In this class we will explore, through the study of Cuban and Puerto Rican history and literature, the islands’ many shared legacies such as colonialism, slavery, political unrest, and US intervention. Moreover, through readings of works by a variety of authors and literary genres, we will examine the many political, economic, social and cultural factors that have served to shape each island’s identity over the past five centuries. Students will be required to write journal entries for each class, several short papers, and a final essay. There will also be a mid-term exam.

ROSP 40864-01 – Colonial Renegades in Yucatán
MW 11:00-12:15
C. Jauregui

Gonzalo Guerrero’s Offspring. Colonial Renegades in Yucatán.” This is a seminar that focuses on a selection of historical and literary narratives about the figure of Guerrero (the Spanish conquistador that went native and fought on the side of the Maya) as well as on what I call Guerrero’s progeny: a series of renegades that—like Guerrero in the 16th century— went native and ended up fighting against different forms of colonialism since the 16th century until today. This class has a weekly reading requirement of approximately 150 pages, a writing requirement of 5 pages, and a weekly workload of seven hours approximately. Participation in class represents half of the final grade.

ROSP 40875-01 – Migrant Voices: Latino/a Literature through Service-Learning
TR 11:00-12:15
M. Moreno

What can literature teach us about the local Latino community? How does immersion in the community enhance your understanding of concepts such as migration and biculturalism? How can literature combined with experience in the "real world" allow you to connect the dots between politics, economics, history, culture, and the arts? Migrant Voices is a course designed to bridge together the study of U.S. Latino/a literature and the pedagogy of community-based learning. Students will read foundational and contemporary works by U.S. Latinos/a authors from various backgrounds and nationalities (Mexican/Chicano, Salvadoran, Dominican, Puerto Rican, Colombian, Peruvian, etc.) that are representative of the local Michiana U.S. Latino population. Issues of race, ethnicity, gender, class, and transnationalism will be central to our discussions and will be examined through both a literary lens and an experiential perspective. For the CBL aspect of the course, students are required to engage in a minimum of 2 consecutive hours of tutoring/mentoring, once a week, at La Casa de Amistad. Programs are available M-T-W-R from 3-5 pm and Mon. and Thurs. from 4-6 pm. The final grade will be calculated based on: class participation, class journal, essays, quizzes, exam, and a final paper. This class will be conducted in Spanish. Offered to Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors. Cross-listed with: ILS, LAST, AFST.

 

Fall 2018 – Iberian and Latin American Undergraduate Courses

Subject to change. Please refer to InsideND for the most up-to-date, accurate information.

Portuguese Undergraduate Courses

ROPO 10103-01 – Brazilian Portuguese Language & Culture I
MWF 11:30-12:20
S.Teixerira

This is an introductory, first-year language sequence with equal focus on speaking, listening, reading, and writing. An appreciation for the diverse cultures of the Portuguese-speaking world is also encouraged through readings, music, videos, and class discussion. (ROPO 67001)

ROPO 10105-01 – Portuguese for Spanish Speakers I
MWF 2:00-2:50
S. Teixerira

This course sequence is designed for students with at least intermediate-level proficiency in Spanish. Classroom activities emphasize the acquisition of basic language structures, vocabulary, and sound systems, as well as the active use of spoken language in context. Students are introduced to the diverse cultures of the Portuguese-speaking countries through current video, printed media, music, and short fiction. This sequence is followed by ROPO 20201 or ROPO 20202. ROPO 10105 - 10106 and either ROPO 20201 or ROPO 20202 together fulfill the language requirement.

ROPO 20201-02 -  Intermediate Portuguese I
MWF 12:50-1:40
S. Teixeria

Through selected readings in Portuguese, Brazilian, and Lusophone African literatures, films, newspaper and magazine articles, and popular music, students discuss a variety of cultural issues and expand their vocabulary. Particular attention is placed on reviewing major topics in Portuguese grammar and on developing students' writing abilities. ROPO 20201 fulfills the language requirement and prepares students to study abroad in Brazil.

ROPO 20202-01 - Intermediate Portuguese II
MWF 10:30-11:20
S. Teixeira

This is a continuation of ROPO 20201 but it may be taken separately. ROPO 20202 is a fourth-semester language course designed to develop facility in speaking, reading, and writing at an advanced level. Discussions and writing assignments are based on films as well as on short stories, chronicles and newspaper articles.

ROPO 30551-01 -  Brazilian Pop Culture: Music, Television, Cinema & Sports
MW 12:30-1:45
M. Bahia

Students will hone their oral and written skills through the study of a myriad of the most popular cultural activities in Brazil. MPB, Música Sertaneja, Pop, Funk, Soap Operas, Popular Movies, Soccer and Volleyball will provide students with a rich panorama of Contemporary Pop Culture in Brazil while revealing deeper conflicts and tensions within Brazilian society. (Offered in Portuguese). Prerequisite: Intermediate Portuguese II (ROPO 20202) or equivalent.

ROPO 40953-01 – Contemporary Brazil Beyond Stereotypes
MW 2:00-3:15
M. Bahia

Images of Brazil often evoke stereotypical images of soccer and carnaval. In this course, we will study these staples of Brazilian culture beyond the shallow confines of stereotypes. History, Sociology, and Cultural Studies will all contribute for an interdisciplinary approach to understand the complexities of Contemporary Brazilian society. (offered in English)

ROPO 46000-01 – Directed Reading

ROPO 67001-01 – Brazilian Portuguese Languages & Culture I
MWF 11:30-12:20
S. Teixeira

This is an introductory, first-year language sequence with equal focus on speaking, listening, reading, and writing. An appreciation for the diverse cultures of the Portuguese-speaking world is also encouraged through readings, music, videos, and class discussion. (ROPO 10103-01)

Fall 2018 - Spanish Undergraduate Courses

Subject to change. Please refer to InsideND for the most up-to-date, accurate information.

ROSP 20450-01 – Spanish of Business
MWF 10:30-11:20
I. Menes

This course is designed to give students with intermediate-advanced levels of proficiency in Spanish a solid foundation in business vocabulary, cultural concepts, and situational practice that will help them prepare for success in today’s Spanish-speaking business world.  This class seeks to develop intercultural communicative competence for business purposes, such as an understanding of leadership, banking, real state, and ethics, among other topics. By the end of the semester, students should be able to communicate completely in Spanish with Spanish-speaking co-workers, clients, employees, and costumers at the national and international level.

ROSP 20600 - Cultural Conversations & Writing
This is an upper-intermediate cultural conversation and writing course designed to follow the four-semester language sequence and to act as a bridge to more advanced courses. In order to improve oral and writing language skills, this course engages students intellectually by using challenging, authentic materials and focusing on the exchange of ideas. Through the reading, discussion, and analysis of these materials, students will develop more sophisticated oral expression and expository writing as well as critical and abstract thinking skills. Being a content-driven course, topics could include, but are not limited to questions from the domains of politics, history, art, music, literature, film, religion, pop culture, etc. This course may be used as one of the two 20000-level electives for the Spanish major.

ROSP 20600-01 – Cultural Conversations & Writing
MWF 9:25-10:15
T. Botero

The primary focus of this class will be on film, short stories and plays from many of the great writers and producers of Latin America and Spain.  Additional complimentary materials will be used to highlight contemporary topics of history, art, politics, violence, social justice, and culture in general. The purpose of this course is to develop and increase proficiency and fluency of oral expression and expository writing, as well as the development of new, more complex sophisticated vocabulary. By the end of the semester you will be able to write and have conversations about a variety of intricate and more refined issues.

ROSP 20600-02 – Cultural Conversations & Writing
MWF 9:25-10:15
M. Coloma

This course will use informative and thought-provoking films to focus on the history, art and culture of Latin America. Supplementary texts and articles will provide background historical events and analysis to enhance the understanding of the circumstances and themes that each of the films address. A comprehensive review of Spanish grammar will be provided. Also, activities that promote effective communication of abstract themes with high-intermediate use of grammatical structures will be emphasized. The goal of the course is to improve oral and written communication and the development of new, more complex, vocabulary.

ROSP 20600-03 – Cultural Conversations & Writing
MWF 10:30-11:20
T. Botero

The primary focus of this class will be on film, short stories and plays from many of the great writers and producers of Latin America and Spain.  Additional complimentary materials will be used to highlight contemporary topics of history, art, politics, violence, social justice, and culture in general. The purpose of this course is to develop and increase proficiency and fluency of oral expression and expository writing, as well as the development of new, more complex sophisticated vocabulary. By the end of the semester you will be able to write and have conversations about a variety of intricate and more refined issues.

ROSP 20600-04 – Cultural Conversations & Writing
MWF 11:30-12:20
M. Coloma

This course will use informative and thought-provoking films to focus on the history, art and culture of Latin America. Supplementary texts and articles will provide background historical events and analysis to enhance the understanding of the circumstances and themes that each of the films address. A comprehensive review of Spanish grammar will be provided. Also, activities that promote effective communication of abstract themes with high-intermediate use of grammatical structures will be emphasized. The goal of the course is to improve oral and written communication and the development of new, more complex, vocabulary.

ROSP 20600-05 – Cultural Conversations & Writing
MWF 11:30-12:20
M. Jancha

In this upper-intermediate course, we will engage in rich discussions about literary texts and short films from Spain and Latin America that address topics such as: the role of the imagination, the influence of media, power and politics, personalities, and the mystery of love.  Outside of class, students will also participate in target-language conversations to reflect on personal speaking strategies while making cultural connections. In addition, students can look forward to developing their writing skills throughout the semester. From brainstorming to organization and the final revision process, there will be opportunities to write descriptions, opinions, comparisons, and reflections.  We will also review and practice key grammar points in each chapter to improve language accuracy.

ROSP 20600-06 – Cultural Conversations & Writing
MWF 12:50-1:40
E. Mangione-Lora
Más Allá de los Buenos Modales

This course explores part of the 90% of the cultural "iceberg" that lies below the surface of various Latin America cultures, especially Mexican culture in formal situations. We will use authentic texts, film and other media to strengthen our linguistic abilities and develop cultural competency. We will hone our skills in 4 writing genres: descriptive, narrative, argumentative and reflective. We will learn the do's and don'ts, and the historical, social, and cultural reasons for them. By the semester's end you will be comfortable having a spontaneous conversation about complex issues; you will have drafted an example of writing that you are proud of; you will have created an ePortfolio to showcase your work; and you will have learned a few basic steps of salsa, merengue and bachata.

ROSP 20600-07 – Cultural Conversations & Writing
MWF 12:50-1:40
A. Topash-Rios

A Cultural Mosaic: Perspectives on Contemporary Topics
In this course, contemporary readings and films will serve as texts to organize and inspire discussions on inter-societal themes including power, personality, human relationships, perceptions of reality, and more. In addition to readings and short films, there will be targeted vocabulary generation. The main goals of this course are advancement of oral and written proficiency, significant vocabulary acquisition, confidence-building, and cultural awareness.

ROSP 20600-08 – Cultural Conversations & Writing
MWF 2:00-2:50
A. Topash-Rios

A Cultural Mosaic: Perspectives on Contemporary Topics
In this course, contemporary readings and films will serve as texts to organize and inspire discussions on inter-societal themes including power, personality, human relationships, perceptions of reality, and more. In addition to readings and short films, there will be targeted vocabulary generation. The main goals of this course are advancement of oral and written proficiency, significant vocabulary acquisition, confidence-building, and cultural awareness.

ROSP 20810-01 CBL: Language, Culture and Community: Immigration and the Construction of Memory
MW 2:00-3:15
M. Coloma

This fifth-semester language and culture course is designed for students who want to improve their communication skills in Spanish and broaden their understanding of the Hispanic world through connecting with the local Spanish speaking community. Each section may focus on different topics, such as health care, education, social services, history of immigration, and intercultural competence. The course has a required Community-Based-Learning component in which students engage with the Latino community through placements in such areas as health care, youth mentoring or tutoring programs, English as a New Language (ENL) classes, and facilitating educational workshops with parents. In this course, students integrate their service experiences with the academic components of the class through readings, research, reflective writing, and discussion.

ROSP 30051-01 - CBL: Once Upon a Time - Children’s Literature and Community Connections
TR 11:00-12:15
R. Parroquin

Students will be introduced to Literatura Infantil y Juvenil (LIJ) in the Spanish-speaking world through a combination of considerable reading of LIJ across genres and levels and a critical perspective of LIJ via academic text and articles. Authors will include prolific writers of LIJ like Alma Flor Ada, as well as widely known writers like Cortázar, Paz, Pérez Revérte, Poniatowska, and Vargas LLosa who have also begun writing children's books. Among genres read will be folklore, narrative, fiction (contemporary, realistic, historical, multicultural), fantasy, short story, poetry, and non-fiction. Students will also learn about various LIJ book awards and their evolution over time. In addition, students will develop criteria for evaluating quality LIJ. Finally, there is a Community-Based Learning (CBL) component where students will share LIJ with the local Latino community through CBL projects and/or a reading program with Latino youth. Pre-requiste: ROSP 20202 or above or placement by exam. This course can count as an advanced elective towards the major. Crosslist ILS 20913 and ESS 30670

ROSP 30310-01/02/03/04/05 – Introduction to Hispanic Literature and Cultures
Various Professors

This course is a practical introduction to the analysis and explication of Spanish-language literary texts. The course is designed for students ready to move from 200-level Spanish classes to upper-level literature and survey courses. The goal is to develop students' skills of critical reading, as well as students' ability to articulate judgments, feelings and opinions in Spanish; to establish a point of view and argue it effectively. The premise is that these skills of critical reading will increase the enjoyment and appreciation of fine writing. Some class sessions will be devoted to discussion of techniques and terminology of literary analysis. Most class sessions will involve a close reading and discussion of specific texts selected from the anthology Aproximaciones al estudio de la literatura hispánica, a selection of Hispanic prose, poetry and theater from different regions and periods. Students will also write two or three short analytical essays (3-4 pages) during the semester. Prerequisite: ROSP 20202, 20211, 2021, 20237, 27500 or equivalent.

ROSP 30310-01 -  Introduction to Hispanic Literature and Cultures
MW 9:30-10:45
H. Melo Ruiz

ROSP 30310-02 -  Introduction to Hispanic Literature and Cultures
TR 11:00-12:15
I. Luna Lopez

ROSP 30310-03 -  Introduction to Hispanic Literature and Cultures
TR 12:30-1:45
C. Brix

ROSP 30310-04 -  Introduction to Hispanic Literature and Cultures
MW 12:30-1:45
L. Francalanci

ROSP 30310-05 -  Introduction to Hispanic Literature and Cultures
MW 11:00-12:15
P. Aguilera-Mellado

ROSP 30320-01 – Advanced Grammar & Writing
MWF 12:50-1:40
M. Coloma

This course is oriented towards students who have completed the intermediate level and thus want to refine their Spanish competence, as well as for those who wish to study abroad or who are returning from a program in a Spanish-speaking country.  The topics covered in this course include grammar, vocabulary and cultural subjects. Reinforcement of the students’ linguistic development, conceptual accuracy and discursive ability will be emphasized in the use of academic Spanish. This course offers opportunities for students to correct, exercise and obtain confidence in their control of grammatical structures and formal and informal vocabulary.

ROSP 30320-02 – Advanced Grammar & Writing
MWF 2:00-2:50
I. Menes

This course is oriented towards students who have completed the intermediate level and thus want to refine their Spanish competence, as well as for those who wish to study abroad or who are returning from a program in a Spanish-speaking country.  The topics covered in this course include grammar, vocabulary and cultural subjects. Reinforcement of the students’ linguistic development, conceptual accuracy and discursive ability will be emphasized in the use of academic Spanish. This course offers opportunities for students to correct, exercise and obtain confidence in their control of grammatical structures and formal and informal vocabulary.

ROSP 30651-01 - Riot, Rebellion, and Revolution in the Lettered City: Violence and Unrest in Latin America
TR 9:30-10:45
H. Melo Ruiz

Latin American cultural history is one of agitation and turmoil. Since colonial times,  Riots, Rebellions, and Revolutions are not only at the center of Latin America’s politics, but also its art, literature, and culture. Through a survey of a representative selection of canonical and non-canonical Latin American texts (including literary pieces, films, pamphlets, periodicals, photographs, among others), this course will examine the intersections between literature, politics of unrest, and the figure of the intellectual in Latin America. Students will gain an understanding of fundamental topics of Latin American cultural and political history, including colonialism, modernity, racism, and political resistance. This course satisfies either the Early Latin-American Literature and Culture or the Modern Latin American Literature and Culture distribution requirements.

ROSP 30652-01 - The Carnival Trail
MW 3:30-4:45
I. Luna Lopez

Carnival has been often associated with colorful partying crowds, indulgence in pleasures and mockery of the seriousness of everyday life. In Latin America, carnival and popular festivities have come to the fore since the early twentieth century, when modernizing states reinvented and deployed them as symbols of fraternal nations in which differences coexisted harmonically. But, what role do the carnivals play in the construction of national and collective identities? How do they respond to the antagonisms within a nation? To answer these questions, this course will examine films, paintings and literary texts from the 20th and 21st centuries that represent some of the most popular carnivals in Latin-America: Blacks and Whites Carnival (Colombia), Candombe (Uruguay), Mama Negra (Ecuador), Oruro’s Carnival (Bolivia), Rio’s Carnival (Brazil), and Yawar Fiesta (Peru). The course will focus on the role of carnival and popular festivities’ representations vis à vis hegemonic discourses of national identity; and how carnival’s representations reinterpret the historical past, highlight the existence of diverse cultural temporalities, and display linguistic, cultural and racial heterogeneities. The course will address debates around nation, popular culture, modernity and modernization, and the consumption and appropriation of what has been called Cultural Heritage and patrimony.

ROSP 30712-01 – Imperial Spain
TR 12:30-1:45
E. Juarez-Almendros

This course is an introduction to the history, society and literature of Early Modern Spain. Students will learn about the major historical developments that lead to the creation of Imperial Spain from 1492 to its disintegration by the end of seventeenth century. Through the reading of selected representative works we will discuss how different literary figures project the ostentation of the haughty aristocratic group, the miserable poverty of the vast population, the sexual inequality, and the injustice towards converted Jews and moors.

ROSP 30717-01 – Brains, Brawn, and Heart: Women in Medieval Iberian Literature
MW 2:00-3:15
K. Oswald

This course will examine a panorama of vastly differing depictions of women in Medieval Iberia, in texts written almost exclusively by men. Through a selection of prose and verse from the 13th to 16th centuries, we will consider questions such as loyalty and betrayal, submission and rebellion, piety and blasphemy, and love and rejection. Texts will be read in Spanish though, in most cases, the Medieval Spanish will be at least partially modernized for students.

ROSP 30820-01 – Modern Latin-American Literature and Culture
MW 2:00-3:15
M.R. Olivera-Williams

A survey of literary trends and major figures in modern Spanish-American literature from 1880 to the present. Readings of selected texts in prose, poetry, and theatre. Recommended prerequisite: ROSP 30310.

ROSP 30825-01 – Crimes Narratives Memory & Identity
TR 9:30-10:45
B. Heller

The crime narrative, a large category that includes the mystery novel, detective fiction, testimonial, and other subgenres, is often thought of as a minor genre limited by its formulas. It may be entertaining, but it isn’t “serious” fiction. This course pays serious attention to the genre and its development in Latin America from its origins in the late 19th century to today, focusing on the issues of memory and identity. The goal is to see what these narratives can tell us about the societies they represent, the traumas and conflicts they dramatize, and the losses and mysteries that attend them.

ROSP 40252-01 - The Spanish Baroque
TR 11:00-12:45
J. Vitulli

The course will explore the development of the Baroque in Spain, with emphasis on (1) The Baroque and its relationship to the Spanish cultural context; (2) Characteristics of baroque literature; (3) The relationship between Renaissance and baroque styles; (4) The connection between power and subjects in Early Modern Spanish culture; (5) the Baroque and its links with modern culture among other topics. We will focus on poetry, narrative and theatrical texts.

ROSP 40415- 01 - Foundations of Iberian Modernities
MW2:00-3:15
P. Aguilera-Mellado

The passage to Modern times witnessed major shifts in the understanding of social life, politics, and the central categories of our human condition. This course will examine some of the fundamental concepts and popular notions of Modernity such as: the self, state, nation, nation-state, market-state, representation, and fundamental rights, as they were discussed in the Iberian Peninsula since the last decades of the 18th Century to the first decades of the 20th Century. We will pay particular attention to Spain’s struggle for Modernity by studying historical events and intellectual movements in the country such as Absolutism, Enlightenment, Liberalism, Decisionism, Romanticism, Realism, or Republicanism. We will proceed by comparing Spanish modern authors (Goya, Blanco-White, Larra, Donoso Cortés, Rosalía, Galdós or Pi i Margall) to other European authors (Thucydides, Locke, Kant, or Walter Benjamin). We will read literary texts (essay, narrative, political discourses) as well as other cultural artifacts (treatises, autobiographies, historical articles, and movies). The students will have ample opportunities to discuss and compare processes of modernization in Iberia to similar events and ideas in the United States, France, and the then-nascent Latin American republics. Our international approach will also consider texts of other Iberian regions or nations such as Portugal, Galiza, Euzkadi and Catalunya (Eça de Queiroz, Pi i Margall, Sabino Arana, or Castelao). Ultimately, we will examine how liberalism and the nation-state as well as most of the traditional modern categories of our study are being reevaluated in recent years (Wendy Brown, etc.). All the materials would be provided in their original language as well as in Spanish.

ROSP 40876-01 - Race and Ethnicity
TR 12:30-1:45
M. Moreno

What do Afro-Latina/os, Indo-Latina/os, and Asian-Latina/os have in common? The answer is simple: these groups tend to be erased under the panethnic term "Latina/o." The purpose of this course is to explore the racial and ethnic complexities that are blurred by the umbrella term "Latina/o." Literature by Afro-Latina/o, Indo-Latina/o and Asian-Latina/o authors will provide a lens through which we can examine issues related to race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexuality, citizenship, transculturation, and migration. Readings include Piri Thomas’ Down These Mean Streets, Junot Díaz’s The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, Gloria Anzaldúa’s Borderlands/La Frontera, and Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Hamilton: An American Musical. The course also seeks to bridge the classroom and the community through volunteering at La Casa de Amistad. Tutoring/mentoring at La Casa will provide an opportunity for students to deepen their understanding of the issues studied in class in a "real world" context while also fostering stronger ties between Notre Dame and the South Bend community. For the Community-Based Learning segment of the course, students will spend 2 hours per week volunteering (outside of regular class hours). This course will be conducted in Spanish. Spanish heritage speakers are welcome; ILS majors/minors can choose to complete written work in English. Crosslist AFST 43575, ILS 40910

ROSP 40905-01 - From Text to Table
MW 9:30-10:45
V. Miseres

If the saying "We are what we eat" is true, then food reflects and determines our identity, our subjectivity, and our very being. Through the study of Latin American canonical and less-known literary texts from Colonial to contemporary times, this course focuses on food as a cultural artifact shaped by the dynamics of colonialism, modernization, immigration, and globalization. From a multidisciplinary perspective that includes Literary, Cultural and Gender Studies, as well as History and Anthropology, we will explore topics such as food exchange value, regional and indigenous traditions, social behavior and consumption, cooking imaginaries and social structure, culinary technologies, and gender correlations, among others. Primary sources include texts by Cristóbal Colón, Alvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Ricardo Palma, Esteban Echeverría, Juana Manuela Gorriti, Soledad Acosta de Samper, Rubén Darío, Rosario Castellanos, Gabriel García Márquez, and Isabel Allende. We will read these works together with theoretical approaches by Claude Lévi-Strauss, Walter Mignolo, Pierre Bordieu, and Walter Benjamin.

ROSP 53000-01 Senior Seminar: 
TR 9:30-10:45
J. Vitulli

The Senior Research Seminar is the capstone experience for Spanish majors.  It requires students to draw on skills learned and refined in upper-level classes to create and write a sophisticated, unique research project.  It also requires students to follow the path of academic scholars in choosing a topic, finding appropriate resources (both primary and secondary sources), developing a methodology and an outline, reading sources critically, and writing and re-writing an extended paper.  The Senior Research Seminar has three goals. First, it is intended to introduce senior students to the most up-to-date trends in literary analysis and theory. Second, the course is structured in order to allow students to pursue sophisticated research in the field of Spanish and Latin American literatures and cultures.  Third, the Senior Research Seminar paper could be the basis for a Senior Thesis in order to graduate with distinction in Spanish. The seminar will be divided in two parts. During the first half of the semester, students will be able to know and reflect on a set of methodological and theoretical tools for investigation of cultural practices such as literature, critical theory, popular and mass culture, social movements, and institutions, etc. within the context of Spanish and Latin American social formations. The second half of the semester will be devoted to the composition of the Senior Research paper.

 

 

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