Courses

Spring 2019 French Undergraduate Courses

Subject to change. Please refer to InsideND for the most up-to-date, accurate information.

ROFR 20300 -01 - Conversational French
MWF 10:30-11:20
A. Reaves

This course is designed to further develop the student's conversational skills and grasp of a wide variety of styles and registers in French. Spoken French will be practiced through various types of classroom activities and assignments. Emphasis will be on topics of current interest.  

ROFR 20400-01 – French Business
MW 12:30-1:45
A. Reaves

This course will focus on the practical use of French in an international professional environment. Emphasis will be placed on developing communicative skills and cultural knowledge necessary for the professional world. Students will review relevant structures and vocabulary needed to accomplish specific tasks and skills necessary in a broadly-defined formal professional setting. Assignments will prepare students to apply for an internship in a francophone environment including the preparation of a resume and cover letter in French as well a variety of other oral and written tasks.

ROFR 20710-01 – Introduction to French Pronunciation and Phonetics
MW 2:00-3:15
A. Haileselassie

French Pronunciation and Phonetics is an introductory course to the production and perception of the sounds of French. Students will learn minimal theoretical background and phonetic transcription skills and will have a better understanding of the sound patterns of standard French.
Through audio lab exercises and practices in language computer rooms, students will improve over time their pronunciation.

ROFR 21205-01 – Atelier: Pre-Study abroad
TR 7:00-8:15
L. MacKenzie

What you need to know to flourish in Angers or Paris while you're studying there, and how to build lasting ties to France for the future. A six-week, 1.0 credit preparation for studies at all of Notre Dame's three international study programs in France: at Angers (Université Catholique de l'Ouest) and in Paris (for students going to the Institut d'études politiques or the Université Paris Diderot). A course packet will form the core of the course, and lectures by faculty in ROFR and other departments will shine light on diverse aspects of French culture, history, and current events. Course will be taught primarily in English, and feature student-centered discussions and ample opportunity for Q&A. Enrollment will take place after students have been selected for the programs. Course will begin meeting one week after Spring break.

ROFR 30310-01 – The Art of Interpretation
MW 11:00-12:15
K. Brown

Students will learn how products of French culture from a variety of epochs combine timeless traditions with the utmost modernity. Focus is on skills of close textual analysis for study of poetry, prose, theater, film, journalism, advertising, and allied works of popular culture.

ROFR 30320-01- Advanced Composition: The Art of Writing
MW 2:00-3:15
S. Stojanovic

This advanced-level course, taught in French, is designed for students including those returning from abroad who wish to improve their speaking and writing skills and for students already in the 30000-40000 sequence who seek additional assistance with writing skills and grammar.

ROFR 30654-01 – Writing with Media in French, 2015-2019
TR 2:00-3:15
O. Morel

Virtual and augmented reality, 3D reporting, webdocumentaries, online graphic novels, short animated journalism, digital story telling, experimental podcasts… the past decade has seen an unprecedented multiplication of hybrid forms of expression and France has often been at the avant-garde of those trends. How have those changes affected the production and the content of the “news?” What kinds of new fictions and genres have emerged? How are the recent tensions and shocks (terrorism, refugee crisis…) perceived in this versatile media landscape in France and other francophone countries?
We will welcome guests on Skype: authors, filmmakers. Two written assignments, oral presentations as well as active participation in our class will constitute the basic requirements. Crosslist: FTT 30654

ROFR 30720-01 -French Literature & Culture II
TR 12:30-1:45
A. Toumayan

The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with some major authors and representative works from the period 1750 to the present.  Although some works may be studied through selected passages, the course’s emphasis is on the study of complete works by major authors representing the important literary schools and movements from the Enlightenment to the contemporary era.  Readings of: Voltaire, Rousseau, Flaubert, Baudelaire, Proust, Camus, and Makine.

ROFR 33500-01 "La Chanson Française"
W 7:00-8:15
A. Toumayan

This course proposes to study French culture through the examination of French popular, folk, and traditional songs from the medieval period to the modern era. Songs of various periods, regions, and genres will be studied as well as the relation of folk and popular songs to other cultural forms such as poetry, short story, cinema, or opera.

ROFR 40635-01 – Phantasmes et fantastique
TR 9:30-10:45
A. Toumayan

This course will focus on the development of the genre of short narrative during the nineteenth century in France.  Representative works of Balzac, Nerval, Baudelaire, Barbey d'Aurevilly, Flaubert, Gautier, Mérimée, Maupassant, and Villiers de l'Isle Adam will be considered.  The themes of obsession, trauma and madness will compose common motifs in the corpus of texts that we will examine. We will also study the distinctive features of the aesthetics of Romanticism, Realism and Symbolism as well as generic considerations relating to the conte fantastique. Course requirements include one oral presentation, two papers of moderate length and a final exam.

ROFR 40680-01 - Refugees and Migrants: Rethinking Europe’s Borders
MW 12:30-1:45
S. Stojanovic

Calais. Lampedusa. Gibraltar. These places have become tragically synonymous with Europe’s treatment of refugees and migrants. In this course, we will turn to recent texts and films to investigate the responses to the so-called “European migrant crisis.” We will also consider the rise of nationalism and what it means for the future of the European Union. Assignments include 3 short papers (4-5 pages) and weekly readings of news articles. Taught in French.

ROFR 53000-01- Senior Seminar: Scandalous Texts: Worldwide Writing in French
MW 11:00-12:15
A. Rice

This senior seminar examines how and why new literary works in French employ innovative tactics to tackle pressing contemporary issues including the following: ecological concerns - ethnic and racial tensions - love and relationships in an age of social media - religious extremism - violence and war - migration and identity. The writers whose novels, short stories, and essays we read include Nathacha Appanah from Mauritius, Maryse Condé from Guadeloupe, Fatou Diome from Senegal, Gaël Faye from Burundi, as well as French-Moroccan authors Tahar Ben Jelloun and Leïla Slimani, among others. Taught in French.

 

Fall 2018 French Undergraduate Courses

Subject to change. Please refer to InsideND for the most up-to-date, accurate information.

ROFR 20300-01 – Conversational French
MWF 2:00-2:50
K. Werner

This course is designed to further develop the student's conversational skills by viewing and discussing a number of recent French films. There will also be a variety of classroom activities aimed at practicing extemporaneous speaking in everyday social situations. There will be no formal review of grammar, but there will be a series of short tests over the vocabulary and themes associated with each film. The final project will be a collaborative video based upon the films viewed throughout the semester. Taught in French.

ROFR 20602-01 - Exploring Diversity in France
MW 2:00-3:15
A. Reaves

This course will examine the regional and linguistic diversity of France through a geographical tour of the country and its varied regional cultures. Topics will include the relevant historical context as well as traditions, film, music and food of each region. We will especially consider the role of the French language and minority languages in French cultural identity, as well as current events to arrive at a more diverse picture of what it means to be French. This course is a stepping-stone between the language courses and more advanced coursework in French, and thus we will continue to develop and improve upon reading, writing, listening and speaking skills." Taught in French.

ROFR 20612-01 -Introduction to Medievalism(s)
MW 12:30-1:45
K. Brown

This course explores the relationships between the Middle Ages and contemporary culture through an analysis of literary works, cultural artifacts, and films. Specifically, we examine the ways in which medieval culture has been preserved, interpreted, and adapted in modern cultural forms in order to understand the medieval period and also to expose what its legacy reveals about Western culture and contemporary society. Taught in French.

ROFR 303010-01 – The Art of Interpretation
TR 2:00-3:15
A. Toumayan

Through careful study of selected short excerpts, this course will focus on the identification and resolution of specific problems of textual analysis and interpretation. Prose and verse texts representing various periods, movements, and genres, and selected to highlight a specific problem of reading, will be analyzed following the technique of close reading or explication-de-texte. The course normally includes the analysis of visual art (a session at the Snite museum) and the analysis of a film. Taught in French

ROFR 30320-01 – Advanced Composition: Art of Writing
MW 12:30-1:45
A. Haileselassie

This advanced-level course, taught in French, is designed for students including those returning fromabroad who wish to improve their speaking and writing skills and for students already in the 30000-40000 sequence who seek additional assistance with writing skills and grammar. Taught in French.

ROFR 30652-01 – French Tensions: Graphic Novels
TR 12:30-1:45
O. Morel

Whether it is non-fiction graphic novels or traditional comics, the French and Francophone "bande dessinée" is extremely popular with a strong economic sector, a fast growing adult audience and a crucial influence on the public sphere. While cartoonists were targeted in January 2015, many graphic novels describe a difficult present. This course's goal not only consists of studying contemporary graphic novels in French, but also meet with young authors of the French scene with a special interest on intersections with literature, journalism and cinema. Taught in French.

ROFR 30710-01 – French Literature & Culture I
TR 11:00-12:15
L. MacKenzie

Reading of selections and complete works of outstanding French authors from major genres from the Middle Ages through the 17th century. All "Language and Literature" majors are required to take this sequence, or equivalent advanced courses. "Language and Culture" majors are required to take one literature survey. Students are expected to have already taken ROFR 30310 or ROFR 30320 or to take one of them concurrently with a survey class. Taught in French.

ROFR 40113-01 - The Supernatural in Medieval Literature
MW 11:00-12:15
K. Brown

Throughout history, people have tried to explain events they do not understand by attributing either divine or malevolent origins to them. Such extreme perversions of the natural world ultimately highlight cultural norms and the limits of knowledge in a given society. This course analyzes other-worldly beings and unexplainable phenomena in medieval literature in order to understand this society and to reflect on the ways in which cultural norms may impose limiting beliefs. Taught in French.

ROFR 40780-1 – The French at Work: Unemployment and Precarious Jobs and Culture
MW 2:00-3:15
S. Stojanovic

The enviable “French work week,” long lunch-breaks, the numerous holidays and paid vacations come readily to mind when we think about French attitudes towards work. In this course, we will focus, however, on a crucial contemporary social issue: unemployment and the rise of so-called precarious jobs. Through French literature and film, and with a particular emphasis on representations of gender and racial disparity in certain types of precarious work (nannies, maids, security guards, and nuclear plant workers, among others), we will examine what it takes to work in France today. Taught in French. Crosslist GSC 40503

 

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