Courses

Spring 2018 French Undergraduate Courses

Subject to change. Please refer to InsideND for the most up-to-date, accurate information.

ROFR 20300 -01 - Conversational French
MWF 10:30-11:20
A. Reaves

This course is intended to further develop student's oral communication skills both formal and informal through the discussion of several contemporary French films.  Students will view and discuss several films, relating them to current affairs.  Assignments include a variety of oral presentations, including a final video project and a debate as well as minimal written work including a brief review of vocabulary and structures relevant to the films under discussion.  

ROFR 20400-01 – French Business
MW 12:30-1:45
A. Reaves

This course will focus on the practical use of French in an international professional environment. Emphasis will be placed on developing communicative skills and cultural knowledge necessary for the professional world. Students will review relevant structures and vocabulary needed to accomplish specific tasks and skills necessary in a broadly-defined formal professional setting. Assignments will prepare students to apply for an internship in a francophone environment including the preparation of a resume and cover letter in French as well a variety of other oral and written tasks.

ROFR 20710-01 – Introduction to French Pronunciation and Phonetics
MW 2:00-3:15
A. Haileselassie

French Pronunciation and Phonetics is an introductory course to the production and perception of the sounds of French. Students will learn minimal theoretical background and phonetic transcription skills and will have a better understanding of the sound patterns of standard French.

Through audio lab exercises and practices in language computer rooms, students will improve over time their pronunciation.

ROFR 21205-01 – Pre-Study abroad
TR 7:00-8:15
L. MacKenzie

What you need to know to flourish in Angers or Paris while you're studying there, and how to build lasting ties to France for the future. A six-week, 1.0 credit preparation for studies at all of Notre Dame's three international study programs in France: at Angers (Université Catholique de l'Ouest) and in Paris (for students going to the Institut d'études politiques or the Université Paris Diderot). A course packet will form the core of the course, and lectures by faculty in ROFR and other departments will shine light on diverse aspects of French culture, history, and current events. Course will be taught primarily in English, and feature student-centered discussions and ample opportunity for Q&A. Enrollment will take place after students have been selected for the programs. Course will begin meeting one week after Spring break.

ROFR 30310-01  – The Art of Interpretation
TR 9:30-10:45
L. MacKenzie

Students will learn how products of French culture from a variety of epochs combine timeless traditions with the utmost modernity. Focus is on skills of close textual analysis for study of poetry, prose, theater, film, journalism, advertising, and allied works of popular culture.

ROFR 30320-01- Advanced Composition: The Art of Writing
MW 2:00-3:15
S. Stojanovic

This advanced-level course, taught in French, is designed for students including those returning from abroad who wish to improve their speaking and writing skills and for students already in the 30000-40000 sequence who seek additional assistance with writing skills and grammar.

ROFR 30653-01 – “States of Exception: Media Ethnicity and Politics in France, 2015-2018”
TR 2:00-3:15
O.Morel

How do recent tensions and shocks (terrorist attacks) affect the media and political landscapes in France? How does the extension of power devoted to repression and to the police, impact culture and the State in France? In this course we will pay special attention to the “state of exception” and analyze its history, its impact on discourses of race, class and gender. Our notion of “state of exception” will revolve around the legal concept (state of emergency, state of siege…) as well as, in a broader sense, an ideological and cultural formation that tends to dominate politics since 9/11. In this context, we will pay special attention to inclusive and exclusive ideologies and see how these are translated in artistic forms (cinema, music, literature, art), and political cultures and formations. We will study recent and older “films policiers” and “romans noirs,” non-fiction investigative journalism exploring political scandals and crimes (with graphic novels), music (protest songs), theatre (Ariane Mnouchkine’s work with the Théâtre du Soleil), and new forms of activism through alternative cultures of resistance (“Nuit Debout,” “ZAD Notre Dame des Landes”…). We will welcome guests on Skype: authors, filmmakers. Two written assignments, oral presentations as well as active participation in our class will constitute the basic requirements.

ROFR 30656-01 – Rich and Poor in Paris
MW 3:30-4:45
J. Douthwaite

This new course familiarizes students with the French technique of explication de texte by focusing on the fortunes of Paris and its people in a broad variety of sources. Students will engage in oral and written analyses, learning vocabulary terms and concepts and applying them to different texts about Paris and Parisians, transactions and inheritances, past and present. Designed to complement a special exhibit at the Snite Museum of Art ("Money Worries," Jan.-March 2018), the course questions the essential relation between people, goods, and money. With a partner, each student is required to serve as discussant on one occasion (20 minutes in-class; filmed).  Written work includes one report on the work as discussant (two pages); an analytic / comparative mémoire of 8 pages total (two 4-page papers); and eight grammar lessons.

Our reading materials will be as lively and diverse as the great city itself. They will include tales and historical legends for young Parisians; poetry by Charles Baudelaire, and excerpts from classic novels by Victor Hugo (Notre Dame de Paris and Les Misérables). Visual “texts” include film clips from Paris by Cédric Klapisch, and Woody Allen’s Midnight in Paris. Musical “texts” include songs by Enzo Enzo, Jacques Dutronc, and Thomas Dutronc. We will also read the first half of the prize-winning novel, Suite française (2004; written 1942) by Irène Némirovsky, who tragically died in a Nazi concentration camp before finishing it. Bi-weekly grammar lessons will refresh students’ mastery of the language, all the while revealing linguistic particularities of the texts in question. Roger Hawkins and Richard Towell, French Grammar and Usage (3rd  ed.) is required.   À nous tous, Paris!


ROFR 30720-01 -French Literature & Culture II
TR 11:00-12:15
Alain Toumayan

The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with some major authors and representative works from the period 1750 to the present.  Although some works may be studied through selected passages, the course’s emphasis is on the study of complete works by major authors representing the important literary schools and movements from the Enlightenment to the contemporary era.  Readings of:   Voltaire, Rousseau, Flaubert, Baudelaire, Proust, Camus, and Makine.
 

ROFR 33500-01 "La Chanson Française"
W 7:00-8:15
A.Toumayan

This course proposes to study French culture through the examination of French popular, folk, and traditional songs from the medieval period to the modern era. Songs of various periods, regions, and genres will be studied as well as the relation of folk and popular songs to other cultural forms such as poetry, short story, cinema, or opera.

ROFR  40854-01 - Francophone Migrations
MW 9:30-10:45
A. Rice

This course examines Francophone literary texts that depict migration toward Europe from various locations (Sub-Saharan Africa, the Maghreb, the Indian subcontinent) and for diverse reasons (war, persecution, economy, ecology) in an attempt to understand the complexities of the contemporary crises we see playing out on and around the Mediterranean Sea. We will read works by Patrick Chamoiseau (Martinique), Ananda Devi (Mauritius), Fatou Diome (Senegal), Gaël Faye (Burundi), Fabienne Kanor (France), and Shumona Sinha (India) in our study of the factors contributing to what it means to be a refugee in France today. As a complement to our literary analyses, we will also examine musical compositions and cinematic creations that focus from different angles on migration and exile in the present context.  Cross-listed with AFST 40179, IIPS 40405

ROFR 40950-01 – Existentialism to Ethics
TR 2:00-3:15
A. Toumayan

The first portion of this course will be devoted to an in-depth examination of the humanist doctrines of André Malraux, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Albert Camus. The course will then focus on the challenges brought to these doctrines by Emmanuel Levinas, in particular, the manner in which Levinas will revise the existentialist conceptions of the individual and the themes of freedom, action, and responsibility. The possibility of extending the thought of Levinas into the sphere of political theory will be considered in connection with the specific problems of humanitarian intervention and protection.

ROFR 53000-01- Senior Seminar: Laugh to Keep From Crying: The Comic Tradition in Medieval and Early Modern Literature
MW 11:00-12:15
Fr. G. Haake

The sixteenth- and early seventeenth-century English philosopher, Thomas Hobbes, described life outside society as “nasty, brutish, and short.” In the Middle Ages and in Early Modern times in France, life inside society was pretty nasty, brutish, and short. Laughter provided relief, an escape, and a means of critique. From the carnavalesque to satire, the comic tradition reveals much about the hopes, fears, and the deadly serious of the Medieval and Early Modern literary tradition. From Marie de France to Villon to Rabelais to Molière, students will discover the richness of the comic and how it manifested itself in all seriousness.

 

Fall 2017 French Undergraduate Courses

Subject to change. Please refer to InsideND for the most up-to-date, accurate information.

ROFR 20300-01 - Conversational French
MWF 2:00-2:50

K. Werner
This course is designed to further develop the student's conversational skills by viewing and discussing a number of recent French films. There will also be a variety  of classroom activities aimed at practicing extemporaneous speaking in everyday social situations. There will be no formal review of grammar, but there will be a series of short tests over the vocabulary and themes associated with each film.  The final project will be a collaborative video based upon the films viewed throughout the semester. 

ROFR 20603-01 – Facets of France, French and the French
TR 9:30-10:45
L. MacKenzie

This content-driven course is intended for students who want for further broaden their knowledge of the French language and related cultures, as well as improve both their understanding of the French and Francophone world and their communication skills in the French Language.

ROFR 20692-01 – “La Beurgeoisie’: Race, Class, and Sex in France Today”
MW 2:00-3:15
A. Rice

This course focuses on contemporary French-language books and films that evoke second-generation immigrants from Algeria and Morocco in France today. We pay special attention to questions of gender, religion, and identity and examine depictions of young men and women from impoverished backgrounds who have managed to climb the social ladder in France in various professions to gain notoriety and respect. Cross-listed with GSC 20524.

ROFR 30310-01 – The Art Interpretation
TR 9:30-10:45
A. Toumayan

Through careful study of selected short excerpts, this course will focus on the identification and resolution of specific problems of textual analysis and interpretation. Prose and verse texts representing various periods, movements, and genres, and selected to highlight a specific problem of reading, will be analyzed following the technique of close reading or explication-de-texte. The course normally includes the analysis of visual art (a session at the Snite museum) and the analysis of a film.

ROFR 30320-01 – Advance Composition: Art of Writing (Department approval required)
MW 12:30-1:45
TBD

This advanced-level course, taught in French, is designed for students including those returning from abroad who wish to improve their speaking and writing skills and for students already in the 30000-40000 sequence who seek additional assistance with writing skills and grammar.

ROFR 30360-01 - French Translation
TR 11:00-12:15
TBD 

This French translation course is divided into units focusing on different types of translation (literary, journalistic, academic, commercial, technical, legal, film subtitling, interpretation, etc.). We will work on both French to English (version) and English to French (thème) translations, and will learn different translation strategies while focusing on building vocabulary and improving French grammar.
Course materials will include: newspaper and magazine articles; Alain Schifres’s study of the rise of “franglais” entitled My Tailor is rich but my français is poor (2014); a short novel, Naissance des fantômes (1998), by Marie Darrieussecq, as well as its translation, My Phantom Husband; the Tumblr blog “les sous-titres de la honte”; and a documentary by stand-up comedian Gad Elmaleh, 10 minutes in America (2014), which addresses the challenges of translating humor and cultural references.

ROFR 30710-01 – Overview of French Lit & Culture I
MW 11:00-12:15
Fr. G. Haake

This course is designed as an introduction to French literature and culture of the Middle Ages, Renaissance, and Classical periods. Rather than focus exclusively on a series of small excerpts from the periods in question, students will be asked to read and analyze several texts in their entirety—or nearly so—that are exemplary of the three main eras under study. This approach will not preclude smaller excerpts from other texts that will supplement the students’ understanding of the literature and culture of this time. In addition, students will have a chance to hone their skills in literary analysis through exposure to literary commonplaces, rhetorical figures, and versification, as well as through the practice of explication de texte. As a final component, students will have the opportunity to develop their cultural literacy of the respective periods through lectures and presentations on art, architecture, music, history, and politics. Texts and authors will include La Chanson de Roland, Villon, Rabelais, Ronsard, Molière, Corneille, and others. Cross-listed with MI 30530.

ROFR 40213-01 – Women in Print
MW 2:00-3:15
Fr. G. Haake

With the advent of the print medium, the barriers to women writers and poets in Renaissance France were seemingly lower. What distinguishes the woman writer in this new era of the printed word? What characterizes their rhetoric, style, and subject matter? In our own time, how have contemporary literary critics both questioned and affirmed their legacy? Through close reading and study of writers such as Marguerite de Navarre, Pernette du Guillet, Louise Labé, and others, while taking into account the male perspective from poets such as Scève and Ronsard, students will examine the role of women in print in sixteenth-century France.

ROFR 40453-01 – Money Matters in French Literature
T 3:30-6:15
J. Douthwaite

The course introduces students to French literature and history from the late 17th century to the late 19th century in historical context. Building on Professor Douthwaite’s current book project, "Financiers We Have Known: A Capitalist History of French Literature," the seminar will expose students to cutting-edge methodologies for studying literature alongside economic theory on human motivation by Shiller, Chang, and Frey. It will focus on fiction that explicitly portrays money and its impact on human life, as seen in transactions, inheritances, credit, charity, and commerce, among other phenomena. Authors to be studied include: La Fontaine, Perrault, Montesquieu, Voltaire, Diderot, Mouhy, Balzac, Hugo, and Zola. Format: advanced seminar with background lectures and well-guided discussions. Cross-listed with ROFR 63490.

ROFR 40654-01 – Cultures of Fear: France and the US in 2016-2017
TR 12:30-1:45
O. Morel

In France and the US, 2015 & 2016 have been marked by major social changes that have impacted the political landscapes and cultures. While reflecting on the long history of the French-US relationship, we will focus on three markers of the post-9/11 & post-Charlie Hebdo/Bataclan world: discourses of inclusion and exclusion (politics); reconfigurations of race, class and gender (society); digital fluidity (media). We will study the election cycles from 2016 (US) and 2017 (France) and pay attention to cultural (cinema, comics, theatre, literature…) and activist responses. Our main objective for the course consists of a refining a concept of “fear.” We will attempt to discern how fear plays a significant role as a driving force in history in general, and in politics today. We will try to understand how this notion has changed since 9/11, both conceptually, and as a central human emotion. We will welcome guests on Skype: authors, filmmakers. Two written assignments, oral presentations as well as active participation in our class will constitute the basic requirements.

 

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