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Romance Languages and Literatures Teams With Cambridge

Author: Aaron Smith

A partnership between the University of Cambridge and Notre Dame’s Italian program in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures is giving graduate students at both institutions the opportunity to work directly with leading scholars in their areas of interest.

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Bringing the Unknown to Light: Faculty Research Overlooked French Writing

Author: Joanna Basile

Two professors of French and Francophone studies in Notre Dame’s Department of Romance Languages and Literatures are bringing recognition to little-known literature of the past and present. Through individual and joint research projects, Professor Julia Douthwaite, a specialist in 18th and 19th century French literature, and Associate Professor Alison Rice, an expert in French-language texts from the 20th and 21st centuries, are working toward this common goal.

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Prof. Juan Vitulli authors book

Author: Julie Logue

Instable Puente by Juan Vitulli

Instable Puente: La construcción del letrado criollo en la obra de Juan de Espinosa Medrano is the first complete study of the life and works of this 17th century Peruvian priest who is considered today as the most significant letrado criollo (creole man of letters). In particular, the book focuses on how Juan de Espinosa Medrano composes an ensemble of texts (a treatise on poetry, theater, and several sermons) that demonstrates his ability to master the European literary code, while simultaneously undermining the supposed natural preeminence of Spanish intellectuals over the colonized. The book integrates Peninsular Spanish and Latin American cultures through the common field of the Baroque, without losing track of the explicit differences of each. Instable Puente undertakes a comprehensive analysis of the complete works of Espinosa Medrano in the context of the cultures, religious beliefs, economic structures, and political institutions of its day.…

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The Frankenstein of 1790 and other Lost Chapters from Revolutionary France

Author: Julie Logue

Julia V Douthwaite, Author

The French Revolution brings to mind violent mobs, the guillotine, and Madame Defarge, but it was also a publishing revolution: more than 1,200 novels were published between 1789 and 1804, when Napoleon declared the Revolution at an end. In this book, Julia V. Douthwaite explores how the works within this enormous corpus announced the new shapes of literature to come and reveals that vestiges of these stories can be found in novels by the likes of Mary Shelley, E. T. A. Hoffmann, Honoré de Balzac, Charles Dickens, Gustave Flaubert, and L. Frank Baum.…

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Romance Languages and Literatures Teams With Cambridge

Author: Aaron Smith

A partnership between the University of Cambridge and Notre Dame’s Italian program in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures is giving graduate students at both institutions the opportunity to work directly with leading scholars in their areas of interest.

“Our aim is to enhance the preparation of our students by providing them with direct access to international scholarly networks while they are still working on their degrees,” says Theodore Cachey, the Albert J. and Helen M. Ravarino Family Director of Dante and Italian Studies and professor and chair in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures.…

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Prof. Julia Douthwaite authors book

Author: Julie Logue

Prof

New! Published in September 2012: The Frankenstein of 1790 and other Lost Chapters from Revolutionary France
The French Revolution brings to mind violent mobs, the guillotine, and Madame Defarge, but it was also a publishing revolution: more than 1,200 novels were published between 1789 and 1804, when Napoleon declared the Revolution at an end. In this book, Julia V. Douthwaite

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Prof. Marisel Moreno authors book on Puerto Rican Women

Author: Julie Logue

Family Matters by Marisel Moreno

Family Matters: Puerto Rican Women Authors on the island and the Mainland (University of Virginia Press, New World Studies, August 2012)

Adopting a comparative and multidisciplinary approach to Puerto Rican literature, Marisel Moreno juxtaposes narratives by insular and U.S. Puerto Rican women authors in order to examine their convergences and divergences. By showing how these writers use the trope of family to question the tenets of racial and social harmony, an idealized past, and patriarchal authority that sustain the foundational myth of la gran familia, she argues that this metaphor constitutes an overlooked literary contact zone between narratives from both sides. Moreno proposes the recognition of a "transinsular" corpus to reflect the increasingly transnational character of the Puerto Rican population and addresses the need to broaden the literary canon in order to include the diaspora. Drawing on the fields of historiography, cultural studies, and gender studies, the author defies the tendency to examine these literary bodies independently of one another and therefore aims to present a more nuanced and holistic vision of this literature.…

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Family Matters: Puerto Rican Women Authors on the Island and the Mainland

Author: Julie Logue

Family Matters by Marisel Moreno

Adopting a comparative and multidisciplinary approach to Puerto Rican literature, Marisel Moreno juxtaposes narratives by insular and U.S. Puerto Rican women authors in order to examine their convergences and divergences. By showing how these writers use the trope of family to question the tenets of racial and social harmony, an idealized past, and patriarchal authority that sustain the foundational myth of la gran familia, she argues that this metaphor constitutes an overlooked literary contact zone between narratives from both sides. Moreno proposes the recognition of a "transinsular" corpus to reflect the increasingly transnational character of the Puerto Rican population and addresses the need to broaden the literary canon in order to include the diaspora. Drawing on the fields of historiography, cultural studies, and gender studies, the author defies the tendency to examine these literary bodies independently of one another and therefore aims to present a more nuanced and holistic vision of this literature. 

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College of Arts and Letters launches international economics major

Author: Joanna Basile

A male student raises his diploma to the crowd

Linguistic and cultural fluency is an increasingly important asset in business. And to address the growing demand for professionals who can both understand and help shape the world market, the College of Arts and Letters has created a new major in international economics. The major combines substantial coursework in the Department of Economics with advanced training in language and culture, starting with French, Italian or Spanish.

It will also provide students with the potential for overseas internships and specialized research projects. “This program will be an attractive option for ambitious, sophisticated and savvy Notre Dame undergraduates seeking to prepare themselves for successful international careers,” says Richard Jensen, Gilbert F. Schaefer Professor of Economics and chair of the Department of Economics.

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Prof. Alison Rice authors book

Author: Julie Logue

Prof

Alison Rice. Polygraphies: Francophone Women Writing Algeria. Charlottesville and London: University of Virginia Press, 2012. ISBN 978-0-8139-3292-7. 256 p.

Coinciding with the fiftieth anniversary of Algeria’s independence, Polygraphies is significant and timely in its focus on autobiographical writings by seven of the most prominent francophone women writers from Algeria today, including Maïssa Bey, Hélène Cixous, Assia Djebar, Malika Mokeddem, and Leïla Sebbar. These authors witnessed both the “before” and “after” of the colonial experience in their land, and their fictional and theoretical texts testify to the lasting impact of this history. From a variety of personal perspectives and backgrounds, each writer addresses linguistic, religious, and racial issues of crucial contemporary importance in Algeria. Alison Rice engages their work from a range of disciplines, striving both to heighten our sensitivity to the plurality inherent in their texts and to move beyond a true/false dichotomy to a wealth of possible truths, all communicated in writing.…

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Graduating Seniors Receive National Fellowships

Author: Julie Logue

Graduating seniors receive national fellowships
May 18, 2012 • Arts and Letters
The Fulbright Exchange Program, National Science Foundation, and other national and international organizations have awarded postgraduate scholarships and fellowships to 13 members of the University of Notre Dame’s Class of 2012, 10 of whom are students in the College of Arts and Letters. Two Arts and Letters graduates of earlier classes also received prestigious fellowships and scholarships this year.

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Alumna Reports From the Heart of the Vatican

Author: By Andrew Vanden Bossche

Elizabeth Simari ’08, crosses Saint Peter’s Square on the way to and from work, shops at the Vatican’s grocery store, and has even had the Pope drop by her office. “It’s an amazing experience,” says Simari, who majored in Italian and English at Notre Dame and now works for the weekly English edition of the Vatican newspaper, L’Osservatore Romano. “I feel blessed to have these once-in-a-lifetime opportunities.”

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