Courses

Fall 2017 - Romance Languages Undergraduate and Graduate Courses

Subject to change. Please refer to InsideND for the most up-to-date, accurate information.

LLRO 13186-02 –  University Seminar: On Interpretation: The Art of Caressing Art
TR 2:00-3:15pm
L. MacKenzie

In this seminar, our truck will be with “texts” from various registers of art—for example, songs by Bob Dylan, Leonard Cohen; films by Martin Scorsese; poems by Baudelaire, Rimbaud and by those still at their craft, an opera by Bizet or Mozart. This variety of sources is chosen with one purpose in mind: to encourage techniques of reading from the inside of the text outward. To this end, our interest is more on the how than on the what. In other words, how do we go about finding the seam, the portal through which to enter a text. Written work will be publicly scrutinized in the hopes of also cultivating the fine, difficult and all too often lost art of self-critique. Students under the impression that they “can’t” do textual analysis are especially welcome, as, of course, are those for whom literature and the arts are already a source of joy and an engine of growth.

LLRO 13186-03 – University Seminar: Imaginary Worlds and Fantastic Travels
TR 12:30-1:45pm
S. Ferri

This course focuses on the geography of imagined places and made-up fantasy worlds in literature and film. The seminar will be organized around thematic clusters, such as the worlds of the afterlife, utopian and dystopian lands, cities of the future, enchanted gardens and descriptions of unexplored countries. We will see how each theme has developed over time, discuss the reasons and ideas behind each author’s creation, examine the meanings associated with imaginary places, and try to understand what an imaginary place tells us about the real world. Some of the questions that we will raise are: What is the significance of geographical imagination? What are the assumptions and intentions of the authors in developing fantasy worlds? What do imaginary places reveal about the social and historical contexts against which they are set? What is the connection between literary creation and geographical invention? Requirements include one oral presentation, two written assignments, and a final creative project in which each student will contribute to the creation of an imaginary world developed by the class.

CSEM 23101-23 - Money Worries: Status and Value in Literature, Art, and Economic Theory (College Seminar)
MW 12:30-1:45pm
J. Douthwaite

This course builds on the current fascination with wealth and status to help students develop skills and wisdom vis-à-vis mainstays of capitalist thought. The course questions the essential "rationality" inherent in the relations between people and markets. We will study novels by Honoré de Balzac, Alain Mabanckou, and Ayn Rand, theories of human motivation by economists Robert J. Shiller and Ha-Joon Chang, as well as popular media portrayals of wealthy and poor people, in order to understand how value is assigned to certain products and social profiles (and not others), and to see how the marketing of elitism depends on socio-political factors to succeed.

Undergraduate

LLRO 10112-01 – Beginning Creole
TBD
K. Richman

Creole is spoken by an estimated seventeen million people. Creole is spoken on the islands of the Caribbean and the western Indian Ocean that were former or current French colonial possessions and in the countries where many of these former island residents have emigrated, including the United States, Canada, France, Dominican Republic, Bahamas and other parts of Latin America and the Caribbean. Haitians are the largest Creole speech community of approximately eleven and a half million speakers. Creole language courses provide a valuable foundation for Notre Dame faculty, staff and students working to understand and address critical issues related to Haiti and the Francophone world, from language and culture to history and education, from engineering to public health. Creole language and literature are of increasing interest in the dynamic field of Francophone studies. Creole has also become a major area in the field of linguistics, especially in areas of language evolution, sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology. This is a three-credit introductory language course. The instructor will balance both spoken and written Creole as well as exercise reading and listening.

LLRO 20312-01 – Ad Oral Expression in Creole
TBD
TBD

Designed for students interested in developing their comprehension, fluency and pronunciation. This mini-course in Creole offers both informal and structured conversation based on current events. Topical conversation on politics, society, and culture will be based on authentic materials.

LLRO 20612-01 – Genesis of the Italian –American Identity
MW 2:00-3:15pm
K. Boyle

At the turn of the twentieth century the US experienced one of the largest immigration waves in its history. Millions of Italian immigrants who made their way through Ellis Island at the time would leave a permanent imprint on the American landscape and social texture, just as the American experience would shape their identity. This course explores in an interdisciplinary way the many cultural aspects that define Italian-Americans, including religion, language, family structure and gender roles, traditions and celebrations, cuisine, political and social worldview, and artistic representations. The aim of this course is for students to analyze how these cultural facets created the Italian-American identity. Cross-listed with ROIT 20612.

LLRO 30030-01 - Bilingual/Bicultural Education
MW 
E. Lemrow

Schools across the nation are re-investing in dual language and immersion bilingual education programs.  Benefits of such schooling are not only cognitive in nature, but help build what the American Council for Teachers of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) describes as intercultural competency. In what ways do these programs impact and serve students both of monolingual and bilingual backgrounds? What programmatic and pedagogical structures best impact successful language learning for language learners from both communities? How can bilingual education also be bicultural with commitments to culturally sustaining pedagogies? This course introduces students to important concepts, ideas, and research in bilingual and bicultural education. The first half of the course is dedicated to exploring bilingualism, while the second half focuses on bilingual education.  Important course issues include: 1) definitions and measurements of bilingualism; 2) languages in society; 3) history of bilingual education in America; 4) development and maintenance of bilingualism; 5) effective models of bilingual education; 6) theories and research on second language acquisition and bilingualism; and 7) bilingualism and cognition; 8) bilingualism and biliteracy; 9) bilingualism in the modern world. These and other issues will be explored through contemporary readings and research as well as a community-based research component which will allow students to explore, observe, and further research bilingual programs in action at area schools. This course can count as an advanced elective taught in English for IERL, RLL, ROSP and ROS2 majors.

LLRO 30883-01 – Mexican Immigration: A South Bend Case Study
TR 12:30-1:45pm
K. Richman

Mexican immigrants are the largest immigrant group in South Bend. This course aims to understand and share information about who these new immigrants are, why they have come to the Midwest, and Chicago and South Bend, in particular, and how they are adapting and contributing to South Bend economic and social life. Students will contribute to documentation of the innovative adaptations of this migrant community, especially the growth of an ethnic enclave of small businesses that both unite Mexicans as an ethnic group and sustain their ties to their homelands. Kinship networks, economic relations, political activities and religious practices simultaneously involve Mexicans in home and diaspora locations. Understanding the relationships between Mexicans' immigrant integration and transnational allegiances is a key goal of the course. Cross-listed with ILS 43101

LLRO 40114-01 – Dante’s Divine Comedy: The Christian Universe as Poetry
TR 12:30-1:45pm
Z. Baranski

Dante is the greatest religious poet of Western culture, and his great epic poem, the Divine Comedy, offers a remarkable and original synthesis of his view of the fundamental relationship between God and humanity. The course offers an introduction to Dante’s Commedia (the title of the poem is Comedy and not Divine Comedy as is commonly believed) by focusing on the first of its three parts, Inferno, while also paying significant attention to its other two parts, Purgatorio and Paradiso. Classes principally concentrate on providing readings of individual cantos. (The course is divided into 4 introductory lectures, 12 classes on Inferno, 7 on Purgatory, and 6 on Paradiso.) At the same time, broader issues central to Dante’s masterpiece will be discussed. In particular, attention will be paid to Dante’s ties to classical and Christian culture, his political views, his ideas on language, his involvement in contemporary intellectual debates, his efforts to use poetry for ethical and religious ends, and his literary experimentation (including his perplexing choice of title for his masterpiece). The course is taught in English. Dante’s poem, too, will be read in English translation, though students with a reading knowledge of Italian are encouraged to read it in both languages. The translation is that found in the annotated bilingual edition by Robert and Jean Hollander (the three-volume—Inferno, Purgatorio, Paradiso—paperback edition is published by Anchor Books, an imprint of Random House). Counts as an Italian Studies course for the Major or Minor. Cross list with MI 40565/MI 60552, LLRO 40114.

LLRO 40552-01 – Graphic Wounds: Graphic Novels
TR 3:30-4:45pm
O. Morel

Blue is the Warmest Color is the title of the film that won the 2013 Cannes Festival's Palme d'Or. For the first time, the prize went to the cinematic adaptation of a graphic novel. Graphic novels have demonstrated a tendency to serve as a major source of inspiration for filmmakers. The goal of this class is to analyze how literacy, print technology, the film industry, and developments in narrative art combine to transform the tradition of graphic novels in a changing context. Our approach consists of analyzing how post-9/11 graphic novels depict today's world in an original way, in an innovative genre located at the intersections of several disciplines: journalism, auto-fiction, photographic and cinematic representations. In our examination of the most recent developments of the genre, the texts and films we study include works by Will Eisner alongside Art Spiegelman's In the Shadow of No Tower, Alissa Torres & Sungyoon Choi's American Widow, Sid Jacobson & Ernie Colón's The 9/11 Report: A Graphic Adaptation, Guibert, Lefèvre & Lermercier's The Photographer: Into War-torn Afghanistan, Marjane Satrapi's Persepolis, Joe Sacco's Palestine and Days of Destruction, Days of Revolt, Etienne Davodeau's, The Initiates, and Enki Bilal's The Dormant Beast, among others. Co Requisites: LLRO 40552. Cross-listed with FFT 40252, and AMST 30730.

LLRO 40952 – The Giant of the South: Brazil in the 21st Century
MW 2:00-3:15pm
M. Bahia

What are the new challenges for the Brazilian democracy and human development post-impeachment? What are the current issues in race, religion, class, gender and politics that are shaping the present and the future of the Giant of the South? (offered in English) Cross-listed ROSP 40952, GSC 40520 and AFST 40579.

Graduate

LLRO 61075-01 – Practicum in Spanish
R 8:20-9:50am
M. Jancha

This weekly practicum is designed for graduate students who serve as Spanish Teaching Assistants in the Department of Romance Languages. The course focuses on the development of organizational and presentation skills needed to excel as a foreign language teacher. Students carry out micro-teaching projects and collaborate to develop a portfolio of their own activities based upon the principles learned in the course.

LLRO 61076-01 – Practicum in French
MW 8:20-9:50am
A. Haileselassie

This weekly practicum is designed for graduate students who serve as Spanish Teaching Assistants in the Department of Romance Languages. The course focuses on the development of organizational and presentation skills needed to excel as a foreign language teacher. Students carry out micro-teaching projects and collaborate to develop a portfolio of their own activities based upon the principles learned in the course.

LLRO 61077-01 – Practicum in Italian
M 8:20-9:50am
A. Blad

This course is designed for graduate students in the M.A. program in Italian and is mandatory during their first year of teaching. It complements the theoretical basis for foreign language teaching methodology provided in LLRO and gives students hands-on practice with the organizational tasks and pedagogical procedures that are pertinent to their daily teaching responsibilities.

LLRO 63075-01 – Foreign Acquisition & Instruction Methods (Graded)
R 12:30-3:15pm
A. Blad

An introduction to theories of foreign language acquisition and methods of foreign language instruction related to them, including the direct, cognitive, communicative, and input (natural) approaches. Required of teaching assistants in the department.

LLRO 63213 01 – Religion and Literature in the light of Job
W 12:30-3:15pm
V. Montemaggi

A study of religion and literature through the works of Gregory the Great, Dante, Shakespeare and Primo Levi. Cross-listed PRL 40113, LLRO 40113, THEO 60265, and MI 63585.

Spring 2017 - Romance Languages Undergraduate and Graduate Courses

Subject to change. Please refer to InsideND for the most up-to-date, accurate information.

LLRO 13186-01- University Seminar: On Interpretation
TR 9:30-10:45am
L. MacKenzie

In this seminar, our truck will be with “texts” from various registers of art—for example, songs by Bob Dylan, Leonard Cohen; films by Martin Scorsese; poems by Baudelaire, Rimbaud and by those still at their craft, an opera by Bizet or Mozart. This variety of sources is chosen with one purpose in mind: to encourage techniques of reading from the inside of the text outward. To this end, our interest is more on the how than on the what. In other words, how do we go about finding the seam, the portal through which to enter a text. Written work will be publicly scrutinized in the hopes of also cultivating the fine, difficult and all too often lost art of self-critique. Students under the impression that they “can’t” do textual analysis are especially welcome, as, of course, are those for whom literature and the arts are already a source of joy and an engine of growth.

LLRO 13186-02- University Seminar: Dangerous Reads: Banned Us Latino Literature
TR 2:00-3:15pm
M. Moreno

The recent termination of Mexican-American studies classes by the Tucson Unified School District (AZ) it has provoked a national debate regarding the importance of ethnic studies in our schools.  While each side—proponents of the law and defenders of ethnic studies—continue to argue their case, dozens of literary works have been banned in the classrooms.  From Shakespeare’s The Tempest to Drown by Pulitzer-Prize winner and Dominican-American author Junot Díaz, the list of books “removed” from classrooms reveals that what is at stake is more than just the future of Mexican-American studies.  In this course, students will examine the present controversy surrounding HB 2281, grassroots movements that have emerged in response to it, and a number of the canonical US Latino literature works that were placed on the list of banned books, such as Tomás Rivera’s …and the Earth Did Not Devour Him (Chicano), Sandra Cisnero’s House on Mango Street (Chicana), Junot Díaz’s The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao (Dominican), and US Puerto Rican Martín Espada’s poetry, among other authors of Cuban, Peruvian, Salvadoran, and Guatemalan descent.  The course will have an optional service-learning component that entails tutoring at local La Casa de Amistad once a week. No knowledge of Spanish is necessary.

LLRO 13186-03 University Seminar:  One Hundred Years of Solitude:
TR 9:30-10:45
J. Lund

This course is dedicated to a semester-long study of a masterpiece of narrative fiction in anticipation of its 50th anniversary: Gabriel Garcia Marquez's _One Hundred Years of Solitude_ (1967).  Through careful and systematic reading, our discussions will move in two directions: On the one hand, toward the ways in which the central themes of the text--including but not limited to love, family, war, nation, science, travel, narrative, and writing itself--both illuminate and are illuminated by questions central to Western philosophy.  On the other hand, the way in which the novel negotiates its own specific context--Western culture, the Americas, Latin America, Colombia--and how it confronts us to rethink that context.  At the end of the course, besides having experienced one of the great artworks of the modern age, you should feel that your perspective on the world has been altered, at least a little.  

CSEM 23102-01 The Question of Responsibility (College Seminar)
TR 11:00-12:15
A. Toumayan

The College Seminar is a unique one-semester course shared by all sophomores majoring in the College of Arts and Letters. The course offers students an introduction to the diversity and distinctive focus of the College of Arts and Letters at the University of Notre Dame. Specific sections of the College Seminar vary in their topics and texts (i.e., there will not be a shared reading list across sections), but all feature an interdisciplinary approach, commitment to engaging important questions, employment of major works, and emphasis on the development of oral skills. Every College Seminar syllabus will include works that approach the topic from the perspective of each of the three divisions of the College: the Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences. To learn more about the course and to read the specific course descriptions associated with each section, please visit the college seminar website at www.nd.edu/~csem. 

CSEM 23102-02/03 On Humor: Understanding Italy (College Seminar)
TR 12:30-1:45
J. Welle

This College Seminar explores questions of humor, laughter, and comedy through a rich variety of classical and modern texts. We begin with examples of Greek and Roman comedy, and proceed to examine Commedia dell’arte, an improvisational form of theatre originating in Italy that was influential throughout Europe for over two centuries. We encounter Shakespeare and Goldoni and analyze their relationship to both classical comedy and to Commedia dell’arte. Having traced the contours of ancient comedy and the roots of modern comedy, we turn to a major twentieth-century thinker on humor: Luigi Pirandello. Pirandello’s tragic-comic vision is explored through short stories and a masterpiece of modern theatre, “Six Characters in Search of an Author.” Next, we analyze a series of Italian film comedies discussing them in the historical context of Italy over the second half of the twentieth century. Throughout this trajectory, our primary focus will be on the nature of humor and comic forms as expressed in classical comedy from Ancient Greece and Rome up to contemporary film comedies; our secondary focus will be on why comedy from the ancient classical inheritance through the Commedia dell’arte to contemporary film comedy provides a key to understanding Italy both as an heir to an ancient civilization and as a lively modern country. Students will be evaluated on their preparation for and participation in class discussions, on leading class discussions, on oral presentations, and on a final exam. To further develop skills of speaking and oral presentation, the course will also incorporate aspects of “Readers’ Theatre” as students will learn to read sections from the various plays out loud in class with dramatic effect.

LLRO 10111-01 Beginning Quechua I
MWF 3:30-4:45
V. Maqque

Join the millions of Quechua speakers in South America and around the world. Quechua was the official language of the Inca civilization and continues to be spoken by over 10 million people in six countries in South America today. Beyond its conventional rural environment, Quechua has expanded almost everywhere in our modern world. This course includes basic aspects of the Andean cultures as part of the Quechua instruction. We will explore Quechua stories from ancient and recent times as well as its development in the digital world. Students will acquire elementary knowledge and use of Quechua for everyday interaction. This course can be taken as a six-credit hybrid introductory language course, which combines traditional classroom with on-line instruction. Students attend class with a Quechua native instructor (MWF) and work on-line (T-TH). Or it can also be taken as a three credit regular course with MWF instruction format. The instructor will balance both spoken and written Quechua as well as exercise reading and listening. Knowledge of Spanish is desirable but not required. Cross listed with LAST 10502.

LLRO 10112-02 Beginning Creole
TR 2:00-3:15
K. Richman

This course is intended for students who have taken beginning level Creole Language and Culture. In small-group teaching sessions, students will be prepared for conversational fluency with basic reading and writing skills, emphasizing communicative competence as well as grammatical and phonetic techniques. Our study of Kreyòl is integrated with an exploration of how the language is tied to Haitian society, culture, economy and politics and history. Evaluation of student achievement and proficiency will be conducted both informally and formally during and at the conclusion of the course.  Those looking to develop or improve their language skills are welcome to the class. The program is designed to meet the needs of those who plan to conduct research in Haiti or in the Haitian diaspora, or who intend to work in a volunteer or professional capacity either in Haiti or with Haitians abroad.

LLRO 20610-01- Literature, Science, Humanity, and Friendship: Reading Primo Levi
MW 3:30-4:45pm
V. Montemaggi

In this course we will explore the profound connections between literature, science, and what it means to be human. We will carry out such exploration by reading together the work of Jewish Italian writer and chemist Primo Levi, doing so in the light of one of the central ethical principles governing Levi’s work: friendship. Jewish Italian writer and chemist Primo Levi is considered one of the most important authors of the 20th Century. Levi’s The Periodic Table (1975) has been referred to as “the best science book ever”, and his If This Is A Man (1947/1958) is widely regarded as one of the most thought-provoking accounts of humanity ever to have been written. We will read both of these, together with a number of other works by Levi, including poems, essays, short stories, and a novel. By doing so we will give ourselves the opportunity of diving deeply and fruitfully into reflection on some vital questions: what is a human being? What is the relationship between friendship and truth? What is the relationship between suffering and knowledge? How are the humanities and the sciences connected to each other? Taught in English. Throughout the course, we will make use of materials from the Primo Levi Collection of the Hesburgh Library - one of the most important collections in the world dedicated to the study of Primo Levi. Crosslist ROIT 20610-01 and  PRL 33115-01

LLRO 33000 Exploring International Economics
M 5:00-6:00
S. Williams, M. Flannery, D. Della Rossa

In this special course designed for inquisitive international economics / romance language majors, students will attend a number of lectures, panels, and seminars on campus during the semester, with a follow-up discussion for each led by either a visitor or a member of the economics or romance languages faculty. Before each session, students will be expected to complete a short reading assignment. At each follow-up session, the students will submit a 1-2 page summary and analysis of the talk, with a critical question for discussion. The goal is to encourage students to enrich their major experience by participating in the intellectual discussions that occur amongst ND and visiting scholars across the campus, distinguished alumni, and professionals in the field. 

LLRO 40116-01 Dante II
TR 11:00-12:15
C. Moevs

Dante's Comedy is one of the supreme poetic achievements in Western literature. It is a probing synthesis of the entire Western cultural and philosophical tradition that produced it, a radical experiment in poetics and poetic technique, and a profound exploration of Christian spirituality.  Dante I and Dante II are an in-depth study, over two semesters, of the entire Comedy, in its historical, philosophical and literary context.   Dante I focuses on the Inferno and the works that precede the Comedy (Vita Nova, Convivio, De vulgari eloquentia); Dante II focuses on the Purgatorio and Paradiso, along with the Monarchia.  Students may take just one of Dante I and II or both, in either order.   Lectures and discussion in English; the text will be read in a facing-page translation, so we can refer to the Italian (but knowledge of Italian is not necessary).  Counts as an Italian Studies course.  Students with Italian have the option of also enrolling in a one-credit pass/fail Languages Across the Curriculum section, which will meet one hour per week to read and discuss selected passages or cantos in Italian.   NOTE:  the one-semester lecture course ROIT 40114, Dante’s Divine Comedy: The Christian Universe as Poetry, is often offered in place of Dante I. LIT - Univ. Req. Literature. Cross-listed with ROIT 40116, MI 40553,MI 60553

LLRO 40548-01 Italian Cinema Realities of History
TR 12:30-1:45
Z. Baranski

Italian film-making continues to be most highly regarded for the films made by directors, such as Vittorio De Sica, Roberto Rossellini, and Luchino Visconti, who belonged to the Neo-realist movement (1945-53) and who tried to make films that examined the contemporary experiences of ordinary Italians. The films were inspired by the belief that, by presenting a truthful reflection of life in Italy which gave spectators information about the experiences of their fellow citizens, they would lead to greater understanding, and hence to a better society. Such was the impact of Neo-realist cinema on Italian culture in general and on Italian film-making in particular that its influence may be discerned in most films that have been made from the mid 1950s to this day. This state of affairs has led to the assumption that Neo-realism marks a decisive break with Italy’s pre-war past. Yet, even though Neo-realism did constitute, in ideological terms, a clear departure from fascism, its stylistic roots, its sense of the need for commitment, and its faith in the efficacy of a realist aesthetic all establish ties both with Liberal and Fascist Italy. The principal aim of the course is to explore the construction and development of the Italian cinematic realist tradition from the silent era to the early 1970s, although its primary focus is on the period 1934-1966. In particular, the course examines the formal and ideological continuities and differences between Neo-realist films and their silent and fascist predecessors. In a similar way, it analyses Neo-realism’s impact on later film-makers, such as Federico Fellini, Pietro Germi, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Gillo Pontecorvo, Dino Risi, and Francesco Rosi, who attempted to develop new versions of cinematic realism.  Taught in English; counts as an Italian Studies course  Cross lists: LLRO 40548, FTT 40249.

LLRO 40550-01- Italian Theatre: From the Commedia dell'Arte to Goldoni
TR 2:00-3:15pm

The commedia dell'arte established modern professional theatre, and had a massive impact throughout Europe beginning in the 16th century.  This course will trace the evolution and impact of the commedia dell'arte (improvisation, actors working as playwrights, professional troupes, etc...), how it produced some classics of the European repertoire (the plot of Mozart's Don Giovanni for example), and how it evolved into the great written theatre of early modern Italy, especially Goldoni.  The course will be conducted in English. . Crosslists ROIT 40550 FTT 40550 MI 40557 Attribute MESE (European Studies)

LLRO 61075 – Practicum in Teaching Spanish
F 2:00-2:50
M. Jancha

This weekly practicum is designed for graduate students who serve as Spanish Teaching Assistants in the Department of Romance Languages. The course focuses on the development of organizational and presentation skills needed to excel as a foreign language teacher. Students carry out micro-teaching projects and collaborate to develop a portfolio of their own activities based upon the principles learned in the course. 

LLRO 61076 – Practicum in Teaching French
TBD
A. Haileselassie

This coure is designed for graduate students in the M.A. program in French and is mandatory during their first year of teaching. It complements the theoretical basis for foreign language teaching methodology provided in LLRO and gives students hands-on practice with the organizational tasks and pedagogical procedures that are pertinent to their daily teaching responsibilities. 

LLRO 61077 – Practicum in Teaching Italian
M 1:15-3:15
A.Blad

This course is designed for graduate students in the M.A. program in Italian and is mandatory during their first year of teaching. It complements the theoretical basis for foreign language teaching methodology provided in LLRO and gives students hands-on practice with the organizational tasks and pedagogical procedures that are pertinent to their daily teaching responsibilities.

Fall 2016 - Romance Languages Undergraduate and Graduate Courses

Subject to change. Please refer to InsideND for the most up-to-date, accurate information. 

CSEM 23101 – On Humor: Understanding Italy
MW 2:00-3:15
J. Welle

This College Seminar explores questions of humor, laughter, and comedy through a rich variety of classical and modern texts. We begin with examples of Greek and Roman comedy, and proceed to examine Commedia dell’arte, an improvisational form of theatre originating in Italy that was influential throughout Europe for over two centuries. We encounter Shakespeare and Goldoni and analyze their relationship to both classical comedy and to Commedia dell’arte. Having traced the contours of ancient comedy and the roots of modern comedy, we turn to a major twentieth-century thinker on humor: Luigi Pirandello. Pirandello’s tragic-comic vision is explored through short stories and a masterpiece of modern theatre, “Six Characters in Search of an Author.” Next, we analyze a series of Italian film comedies discussing them in the historical context of Italy over the second half of the twentieth century. Throughout this trajectory, our primary focus will be on the nature of humor and comic forms as expressed in classical comedy from Ancient Greece and Rome up to contemporary film comedies; our secondary focus will be on why comedy from the ancient classical inheritance through the Commedia dell’arte to contemporary film comedy provides a key to understanding Italy both as an heir to an ancient civilization and as a lively modern country. Students will be evaluated on their preparation for and participation in class discussions, on leading class discussions, on oral presentations, and on a final exam. To further develop skills of speaking and oral presentation, the course will also incorporate aspects of “Readers’ Theatre” as students will learn to read sections from the various plays out loud in class with dramatic effect.

LLRO 10111 – Beginning Quechua 
MWF 8:20-9:10am & TR (CE)

Join the millions of Quechua speakers in South America and around the world. Quechua was the official language of the Inca civilization and continues to be spoken by over 10 million people in six countries in South America today. Beyond its conventional rural environment, Quechua has expanded almost everywhere in our modern world. This course includes basic aspects of the Andean cultures as part of the Quechua instruction. We will explore Quechua stories from ancient and recent times as well as its development in the digital world. Students will acquire elementary knowledge and use of Quechua for everyday interaction. This course can be taken as a six-credit hybrid introductory language course, which combines traditional classroom with on-line instruction. Students attend class with a Quechua native instructor (MWF) and work on-line (T-TH). Or it can also be taken as a three credit regular course with MWF instruction format. The instructor will balance both spoken and written Quechua as well as exercise reading and listening. Knowledge of Spanish is desirable but not required.Cross listed with LAST 10502.

LLRO 10112 – Beginning Creole 
MWF (CE) & TR 3:30-4:45
K. Richman 

This course is intended for students who have taken beginning level Creole Language and Culture. In small-group teaching sessions, students will be prepared for conversational fluency with basic reading and writing skills, emphasizing communicative competence as well as grammatical and phonetic techniques. Our study of Kreyòl is integrated with an exploration of how the language is tied to Haitian society, culture, economy and politics and history. Evaluation of student achievement and proficiency will be conducted both informally and formally during and at the conclusion of the course.  Those looking to develop or improve their language skills are welcome to the class. The program is designed to meet the needs of those who plan to conduct research in Haiti or in the Haitian diaspora, or who intend to work in a volunteer or professional capacity either in Haiti or with Haitians abroad.

LLRO 10113 – Beginning Catalan 
MWF 10:30-11:20am & TR C(CE)

This is a variable three or six-credit hybrid introductory language course, which combines traditional classroom with computer enhanced (CE) instruction. Students who sign up at the three-credit level attend class with an instructor (MWF); students who sign up at the six-credit level attend class with an instructor (MWF) and work individually on specifically designed computer-enhanced course materials (T-TH). The focus of the course is on a balanced approach to acquisition of all language skills –equal emphasis is placed on spoken and written Catalan– and appreciation of Catalan Culture reading, films, music, and class discussion. Combined with an advanced knowledge of Spanish or another Romance Language, Beginning Catalan can allow students to quickly develop reading skills for their research.  The study of Catalan language, culture and history is key to achieving a full understanding of Spanish-Catalan relations as well as the socio-cultural complexity of today’s Spain, and is highly recommended to students who want to enhance their knowledge of the Iberian Peninsula. Given the significant Catalan immigration to Latin America –particularly during the second part of the XIX and the first part of the XX centuries-, the study of Catalan language and culture can also provide students with a broader understanding of the history of countries such as Cuba, Argentina or Uruguay, among others. The interest of Catalan, however, is not limited to the field of Iberian or Hispanic studies: the study of its historic presence in the Mediterranean, as well as the current situation of Catalan within the European Community, in fact, can also promote a better knowledge of the multiplicity of political and linguistic identities present in contemporary Europe, giving students the chance to explore many different topics related to history, socio-linguistics, anthropology, art-history, literature, and beyond.

LLRO 13186-01/02 - University Seminar: Imaginary Worlds and Fantastic Travels
Section 01: TR 3:30-4:45pm
S. Ferri

This course focuses on the geography of imagined places and made-up fantasy worlds in literature and film. The seminar will be organized around thematic clusters, such as the worlds of the afterlife, utopian and dystopian lands, cities of the future, enchanted gardens and descriptions of unexplored countries. We will see how each theme has developed over time, discuss the reasons and ideas behind each author’s creation, examine the meanings associated with imaginary places, and try to understand what an imaginary place tells us about the real world. Some of the questions that we will raise are: What is the significance of geographical imagination? What are the assumptions and intentions of the authors in developing fantasy worlds? What do imaginary places reveal about the social and historical contexts against which they are set? What is the connection between literary creation and geographical invention? Requirements include one oral presentation, two written assignments, and a final creative project in which each student will contribute to the creation of an imaginary world developed by the class.

LLRO 13186-02 - University Seminar: Reading the City: Barcelona in Literature and Cinema
TR 2:00-3:15pm
L. Francalanci
From the lively cultural capital of the nineteenth-century to the gloomy city of the years following the Spanish Civil War, the transformation of Barcelona into the hip Mediterranean city of today has been a long and sometimes troubled journey. Representations of the city found in the works of writers and artists who were born, have lived in, or traveled through Barcelona provide a privileged vantage point onto the spatial, cultural and social transformations the city underwent during the last century. Trough readings, films screenings, and class discussion, this course will introduce students to the construction of the image of the vibrant Catalan capital from the revival of Catalan culture during the late nineteenth century to the present day. Throughout the semester, students will have the opportunity to explore a broad variety of topics such as contemporary Spanish and European history, art-history, architecture, cultural identity politics, space and spatial literary theory. Readings and screenings will include works such as Mercè Rodoreda’s The Time of the Doves (1962), Colm Tóibín’s Homage to Barcelona (2002) , Eduardo Mendoza's The city of Marvels (1990), Woody Allen’s Vicky Cristina Barcelona (2008), and Alejandro González Iñárritu' Biutiful (2010), among others.
 
LLRO 20201 - Intermediate Quechua
MWF 9:25-10:15am
V. Maqque
An intermediate-level, third-semester college language course with emphasis on and refinement of grammatical competence and oral and written language skills. Class time is dedicated to interactive discussion encouraging the development of language proficiency and generating cultural understanding. 
 

LLRO 30811 - History of Colonial Latin America
MW 2:00-3:15
K. Graubart

When Columbus stepped ashore in the Caribbean in 1492, he set in motion a process that led to the creation of wealthy Spanish and Portuguese empires in the Americas, the genocide of countless numbers of indigenous men and women, the enslavement of millions of African men and women, and the eventual formation of a variety of independent states competing in the world economy. In this semester-long survey, we will examine topics in this history that will allow us to consider how history is produced as well as what happened in the past, from various perspectives, from elite colonial administrators and merchants to indigenous peasants and formerly enslaved men and women. CROSSLISTED with History 30901, ROSP 30811

LLRO 40114 – Dante’s Divine Comedy: The Christian Universe as Poetry
TR 2:00-3:15pm
Z. Baranski

Dante is the greatest religious poet of Western culture, and his great epic poem, the Divine Comedy, offers a remarkable and original synthesis of his view of the fundamental relationship between God and humanity. The course offers an introduction to Dante’s Commedia (the title of the poem is Comedy and not Divine Comedy as is commonly believed) by focusing on the first of its three parts, Inferno, while also paying significant attention to its other two parts, Purgatorio and Paradiso. Classes principally concentrate on providing readings of individual cantos. (The course is divided into 4 introductory lectures, 12 classes on Inferno, 7 on Purgatory, and 6 on Paradiso.) At the same time, broader issues central to Dante’s masterpiece will be discussed. In particular, attention will be paid to Dante’s ties to classical and Christian culture, his political views, his ideas on language, his involvement in contemporary intellectual debates, his efforts to use poetry for ethical and religious ends, and his literary experimentation (including his perplexing choice of title for his masterpiece).   The course is taught in English. Dante’s poem, too, will be read in English translation, though students with a reading knowledge of Italian are encouraged to read it in both languages. The translation is that found in the annotated bilingual edition by Robert and Jean Hollander (the three-volume—Inferno, Purgatorio, Paradiso—paperback edition is published by Anchor Books, an imprint of Random House).  Counts as an Italian Studies course for the Major or Minor.  Cross list with MI 40565/MI 60552, LLRO 40114.

LLRO 40595 - New Trends in European Nonfiction Films
TR 3:30-4:45pm
O. Morel

This class will present an overview of the most recent trends in nonfiction films directed and produced in a globalized Europe. One of our goals will consist of analyzing how non-fiction cinema is transforming both the news and traditional fiction cinema. We will also reflect on the political importance of non-fiction filmmaking in conflict situations and in the context of the dramatic political tensions affecting Europe today (terrorism, wars, refugee crises, the rise of far right parties, economic crisis?). We will study new forms of non-fiction cinema: animation, webdocs, 3-D, augmented reality, as well as the changes in the economy of the sector.We will welcome guests on Skype: authors, filmmakers, producers. Two written assignments, oral presentations as well as active participation in our class will consistute the basic requirements.

LLRO 40950 - Brazil Beyond Soccer and Samba
200 million people, 47.3% of the South American territory, the largest economy in Latin America and the 7th in the world, host of the 2016 Olympic Games. Brazil is a South American Giant that needs to be understood by any specialist in the region, from language to business, from culture to international relations. In this course, students will explore the historical, economical and cultural conditions of Brazil during its military dictatorship (1964-1985), its redemocratization in the 1980s, its rise as a regional and global power in the 2000s, as well as the current political and economic crisis that grips the country. Taught in English. CROSS LIST with ROPO 40950

Graduate

LLRO 61075 – Practicum in Spanish 
R 8:20-9:50am
M. Jancha

This weekly practicum is designed for graduate students who serve as Spanish Teaching Assistants in the Department of Romance Languages. The course focuses on the development of organizational and presentation skills needed to excel as a foreign language teacher. Students carry out micro-teaching projects and collaborate to develop a portfolio of their own activities based upon the principles learned in the course. 

LLRO 61076 – Practicum in French
MW 8:20-9:50am
A.Haileselassie

This coure is designed for graduate students in the M.A. program in French and is mandatory during their first year of teaching. It complements the theoretical basis for foreign language teaching methodology provided in LLRO and gives students hands-on practice with the organizational tasks and pedagogical procedures that are pertinent to their daily teaching responsibilities. 

LLRO 61077 – Practicum in Italian
M 8:20-9:50am
A.Blad

This coure is designed for graduate students in the M.A. program in Italian and is mandatory during their first year of teaching. It complements the theoretical basis for foreign language teaching methodology provided in LLRO and gives students hands-on practice with the organizational tasks and pedagogical procedures that are pertinent to their daily teaching responsibilities.

LLRO 63075 - Foreign Language Acquisition and Instruction
R 12:30-3:15pm
A. Blad

An introduction to theories of foreign language acquisition and methods of foreign language instruction related to them, including the direct, cognitive, communicative, and input (natural) approaches. Required of teaching assistants in the department.  

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