Courses

Spring 2018 Italian Undergraduate Courses

Subject to change. Please refer to InsideND for the most up-to-date, accurate information.

ROIT 10101 / 10102 / 10110 – First-Level Italian
ROIT 10101 and 10102, Beginning Italian I & II, are the standard first-year language sequence, 4 credits per semester, meeting three hours per week plus one day online.   ROIT 10110, Intensive Beginning Italian, is a computer enhanced 6 credit course, combining traditional classroom time and online instruction, to attain the result of ROIT 10101 and 10102 in one semester. It involves independent work by students, a portion of which will be performed online on the textbook Sentieri Vista Higher Learning Supersite. Part of the work will be done in class with your instructor (MWF) and part will be done online on Tuesdays and Thursdays by reading, listening, completing exercises, posting writing assignments and recording your speech on the Supersite. There are two instructors assigned to this course. One will be present in class on MWF, and the other will be following your progress online during the T-Th sessions.  With the sequence ROIT 10110 - 20215, you can reach upper level culture and literature courses in one year.

ROIT 20201 / 20202 / 20215 – Second-Level Italian
ROIT 20201 and 20202, Intermediate Italian I and II, are the standard second-year language sequence, 3 credits per semester, meeting three hours per week, and incorporating more advanced language skills with cultural topics.  ROIT 20215, Intensive Intermediate Italian, is a 6 credit course, meeting 5 days per week, and attaining the result of ROIT 20201 and 20202 in one semester.  With the sequence ROIT 10110 - 20215, you can reach upper level culture and literature courses in one year.

ROIT 20300-01 – Let’s Talk Italian I
W 3:30-4:30pm
P. Vivirito

This is a one-credit conversation course meant to accompany your regular classroom study of Italian language, literature, and culture.  It will not review grammar, but allow you the opportunity to practice your Italian with other language students while considering specific aspects of Italian culture.  There will be no written work.  The instructor may send articles or assign brief research assignment or vocabulary preparation prior to class to facilitate discussion.

ROIT 20611-01- Literature and Religion. Reconnection with the Other in Time of Trauma: Literature as the Antidote to Individualism
TR 9:30-10:45
P. Bocchia

This course explores how literature expresses our relationship with the Other as a way to make sense of and face life’s limitations and death. By unsettling our “default” attitudes of individualism, literature’s powerfully communitarian nature reconnects us with the search for the ultimate meaning of reality. By analyzing major figures from both the Italian and the American literary traditions (such as Dante, Petrarch, and Pasolini; O’Connor, Baldwin, and Carver), this course will allow us to think about how literature connects human beings to each other, and fosters civil society. Cross-listed with LLRO 20611

ROIT 20613-01 - The Culture of Italian Emigration
TR 2:00-3:15
M. Valmori

Focusing on the Italian American experience, this interdisciplinary course addresses issues of migration and its related themes of cultural conflict/crossings and ethnic identity formation.  The course engages fictional, non-fictional, musical, and visual texts that recount the experience of migration as seen through the eyes of Italian American as well as Italian authors. The general goal will be to critically evaluate the popular images of Italian emigrants in light of their important contribution to hostile societies, and the texts under analysis will shed new light on the perception/construction of Italian national identity. Cross-listed with LLRO 20613, ANTH 20313, and FTT 30341
 

ROIT 21205-01 Pre-Study Abroad
W 5:00-6:15
A. Blad

A mini-course that prepares students accepted for study abroad in Notre Dame’s programs in Italy.  Students are prepared for various cultural and day-today challenges that await them in Italy.  Course begins the after Spring Break.

ROIT 30300-01 - Let’s Talk Italian II
R 3:30-4:45
C. Moevs

This mini-course in Italian meets one hour per week for group discussions on varied contemporary issues in Italian culture, society, and politics.  Conducted in Italian.  Recommended for students in their third or fourth year of Italian.

ROIT 30310-01 Passage to Italy
TR 2:00-3:15
C. Moevs

In this fifth-semester course you learn to analyze, understand, and appreciate a sampling of great Italian works drawn from the major literary and artistic genres (lyric poetry, prose, theatre, music, film, art, architecture, theatre, opera) from the Middle Ages to the present, set in their historical context. At the same time you will review and consolidate your grasp of the Italian language at an advanced level.  Counts as a Lit-Culture course.

ROIT 30721-01- Introduction to Modern Italian Literature and Culture
MW 11:00-12:15pm
S. Ferri

Renowned for its rich past but full of contradictions up to the modern day, Italy has one of the most fascinating histories in the world. This course sheds light on the history of modern Italy and provides a unique perspective onto Italian modernity by exploring the country’s cultural production. We will focus on key issues that unveil the unique “spirit” of modern Italy, such as the importance of the past, the tension between political realism and idealism, the recurrence of social and political crises, immigration, revolution, and youth culture. Through the study of historical and literary texts, films, and other media, the course seeks to understand the development of modern Italy and its future trajectory.  Taught in Italian; counts as a Lit-Culture course.

ROIT 40116-01- Dante II
TR 11:00am-12:15pm
C. Moevs

Dante's Comedy is one of the supreme poetic achievements in Western literature. It is a probing synthesis of the entire Western cultural and philosophical tradition that produced it, a radical experiment in poetics and poetic technique, and a profound exploration of Christian spirituality.  Dante I and Dante II are an in-depth study, over two semesters, of the entire Comedy, in its historical, philosophical and literary context.   Dante I focuses on the Inferno and the works that precede the Comedy (Vita Nova, Convivio, De vulgari eloquentia); Dante II focuses on the Purgatorio and Paradiso, along with the Monarchia.  Students may take just one of Dante I and II or both, in either order.   Lectures and discussion in English; the text will be read in a facing-page translation, so we can refer to the Italian (but knowledge of Italian is not necessary).  Counts as an Italian Studies course.  Students with Italian have the option of also enrolling in a one-credit pass/fail Languages Across the Curriculum section, which will meet one hour per week to read and discuss selected passages or cantos in Italian.   NOTE:  the one-semester lecture course ROIT 40114, Dante’s Divine Comedy: The Christian Universe as Poetry, is often offered in place of Dante I. LIT - Univ. Req. Literature. Cross-listed with LLRO 40116 and MI 40553.

ROIT 40507-01- Page, Stage, and Screen
MW 2:00-3:15
J. Welle

Conducted in Italian, this course traces Italian comedy and performance traditions in literature, theatre, and film from Unification to the present. A rich vein of comic genius will be explored including: the legacy of the commedia dell’arte, the misadventures of Pinocchio, Pirandello and his writings on humor, the emergence of comic film stars, the variety theatre, the experimental Futurist theatre; film stars and the transition to sound in the 1930s, as well as film stars and comedies from post-WWII to the present.  In addition to discourses of national identity as they intersect with comedy, emphasis will be given to film acting styles, to constructions of gender and social class, to inter-mediality and to changing forms of stardom and celebrity. In sum, this course offers an interdisciplinary exploration of a living comic tradition that continues to be a vital force of aesthetic pleasure and political commentary. Requirements include participation in class discussions, a number of papers and oral presentations, as well as midterm and final exams.  Counts as a Lit-Culture course. Cross-listed with 40507-01

ROIT 40548-01- Italian Cinema: The Realities of History (in English)
TR 12:30-1:45pm
Z. Baranski

Italian film-making continues to be most highly regarded for the films made by directors, such as Vittorio De Sica, Roberto Rossellini, and Luchino Visconti, who belonged to the Neo-realist movement (1945-53) and who tried to make films that examined the contemporary experiences of ordinary Italians. The films were inspired by the belief that, by presenting a truthful reflection of life in Italy which gave spectators information about the experiences of their fellow citizens, they would lead to greater understanding, and hence to a better society. Such was the impact of Neo-realist cinema on Italian culture in general and on Italian film-making in particular that its influence may be discerned in most films that have been made from the mid 1950s to this day. This state of affairs has led to the assumption that Neo-realism marks a decisive break with Italy’s pre-war past. Yet, even though Neo-realism did constitute, in ideological terms, a clear departure from fascism, its stylistic roots, its sense of the need for commitment, and its faith in the efficacy of a realist aesthetic all establish ties both with Liberal and Fascist Italy. The principal aim of the course is to explore the construction and development of the Italian cinematic realist tradition from the silent era to the early 1970s, although its primary focus is on the period 1934-1966. In particular, the course examines the formal and ideological continuities and differences between Neo-realist films and their silent and fascist predecessors. In a similar way, it analyses Neo-realism’s impact on later film-makers, such as Federico Fellini, Pietro Germi, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Gillo Pontecorvo, Dino Risi, and Francesco Rosi, who attempted to develop new versions of cinematic realism.  Taught in English; counts as an Italian Studies course.  

Fall 2017 Italian Undergraduate Courses

Subject to change. Please refer to InsideND for the most up-to-date, accurate information.

ROIT 10101 / 10102 / 10110: FIRST-LEVEL ITALIAN (Various times)
ROIT 10101 and 10102, Beginning Italian! & II, are the standard first-year language sequence, 4 credits per semester, meeting three hours per week plus one day online. ROIT 10110, Intensive Beginning Italian, is a computer enhanced 6 credit course, combining traditional classroom time and online instruction, to attain the result of ROIT 10101 and 10102 in one semester. It involves independent work by students, a portion of which will be performed online on the textbook Sentieri Vista Higher Learning Supersite. Part of the work will be done in class with your instructor (MWF) and part will be done online on Tuesdays and Thursdays by reading, listening, completing exercises, posting writing assignments and recording your speech on the Supersite. There are two instructors assigned to this course. One will be present in class on MWF, and the other will be following your progress online during the T-Th sessions. With the sequence ROIT 10110 - 20215, you can reach upper level culture and literature courses in one year.

ROIT 20201 / 20215 / 20202: SECOND-LEVEL ITALIAN (Various times)
ROIT 20201 and 20202, Intermediate Italian I and II, are the standard second-year language sequence, 3 credits per semester, meeting three hours per week, and incorporating more advanced language skills with cultural topics. ROIT 20215, Intensive Intermediate Italian, is a 6 credit course, meeting 5 days per week, and attaining the result of ROIT 20201 and 20202 in one semester. With the sequence ROIT 10110 - 20215, you can reach upper level culture and literature courses in one year.
ROIT 20202 is an advanced, fourth-semester content-driven language course designed to further the student’s conversational skills as well as grasp of a wide variety of styles and registers in Italian. Spoken and written Italian will be practiced through various classroom activities and assignments. Readings include a wide array of literary and non-literary texts (newspapers and magazines, short stories and so on).

ROIT 20300-01 – Let’s Talk Italian (1.0)
W 3:30-4:30
P. 
Vivirto
This is a one-credit conversation course meant to accompany your regular classroom study of Italian language, literature, and culture. It will not review grammar, but allow you the opportunity to practice your Italian with other language students while considering specific aspects of Italian culture. There will be no written work. The instructor may send articles or assign brief research assignment or vocabulary preparation prior to class to facilitate discussion.

ROIT 20612-01 – Genesis of the Italian-American Identity (LLRO 20612)
MWF 2:00-3:15
K. Boyle

At the turn of the twentieth century the US experienced one of the largest immigration waves in its history. Millions of Italian immigrants who made their way through Ellis Island at the time would leave a permanent imprint on the American landscape and social texture, just as the American experience would shape their identity. This course explores in an interdisciplinary way the many cultural aspects that define Italian-Americans, including religion, language, family structure and gender roles, traditions and celebrations, cuisine, political and social worldview, and artistic representations. The aim of this course is for students to analyze how these cultural facets created the Italian-American identity.

ROIT 30310-01 – Passage to Italy
TR 11:00-12:15
S. Ferri
ROIT 30310-02 – Passage to Italy
TR 9:30-10:45
A. Leone

In this fifth-semester course you will survey the rich panorama of Italian culture from the origins to the present, and learn to analyze and understand works drawn from the major literary and artistic genres (lyric poetry, prose, theatre, epic, novel, film, opera, contemporary song, as well as art and architecture). At the same time, you will review and consolidate your grasp of the Italian language at an advanced level. Taught in Italian; counts as a Lit-Culture course for the major. Pre-requisite: ROIT 27500 or 20215 or equivalent. Strongly recommended for majors and supplementary majors. LANG - College Language Req, LIT - Univ.Req. Literature, MESE - European Studies Course.

ROIT 30711-01 – Medieval/Renaissance Lit and Culture
TR 2:00-3:15
C. 
Moevs
This course helps you to understand and interpret the most important works of medieval and Renaissance Italian literature, painting, sculpture, architecture, and music, in their historical, social, and cultural context. We will analyze key texts from Dante, Petrarch, Boccaccio, Machiavelli, and Ariosto, among others, and learn to appreciate key works of art and architecture by Duccio, Giotto, Ghiberti, Donatello, Brunelleschi, Alberti, Masaccio, Botticelli, Da Vinci, Michelangelo, and Raphael, among others. We will seek to make the historical and social context come alive, especially in Florence, Rome, Milan, Urbino, and Venice, and focus on some of the most extraordinary personalities of an age of great personalities (e.g., Isabella d'Este, Federico da Montefeltro, Michelangelo, Pietro Aretino). The ultimate aim is to reflect in an informed and sensitive way on the great political, social, intellectual, cultural, and spiritual changes that occur between 1200 and 1550 in Italy, the epicenter of one of the most extraordinary periods of human accomplishment in world history, and on how those changes reflect a profound and shifting understanding of self, of the world, and of God. The course also aims to help you speak, understand, and write Italian with more confidence, accuracy, and ease (we will spend a little time in each class reviewing and practicing more sophisticated structures in the language). Requirements include brief discussion forum entries, four brief analytical papers (2-3 pages each), a midterm, and a final. Taught in Italian; counts as a Lit-Culture course; required for majors and supplementary majors in the Lit Culture concentration; this course or ROIT 30721 required for majors in the Italian Studies concentration. Cross-listed with MI 30577, MI 60577 and ROIT 63711.

ROIT 40114-01 – Dante’s Divine Comedy: The Christian Universe as Poetry
TR 12:30-1:45
Z. Baranski

Dante is the greatest religious poet of Western culture, and his great epic poem, the Divine Comedy, offers a remarkable and original synthesis of his view of the fundamental relationship between God and humanity. The course offers an introduction to Dante’s Commedia (the title of the poem is Comedy and not Divine Comedy as is commonly believed) by focusing on the first of its three parts, Inferno, while also paying significant attention to its other two parts, Purgatorio and Paradiso. Classes principally concentrate on providing readings of individual cantos. (The course is divided into 4 introductory lectures, 12 classes on Inferno, 7 on Purgatory, and 6 on Paradiso.) At the same time, broader issues central to Dante’s masterpiece will be discussed. In particular, attention will be paid to Dante’s ties to classical and Christian culture, his political views, his ideas on language, his involvement in contemporary intellectual debates, his efforts to use poetry for ethical and religious ends, and his literary experimentation (including his perplexing choice of title for his masterpiece). The course is taught in English. Dante’s poem, too, will be read in English translation, though students with a reading knowledge of Italian are encouraged to read it in both languages. The translation is that found in the annotated bilingual edition by Robert and Jean Hollander (the three-volume—Inferno, Purgatorio, Paradiso—paperback edition is published by Anchor Books, an imprint of Random House). Counts as an Italian Studies course for the Major or Minor. Cross-listed with MI 40565/MI 60552, LLRO 40114.

ROIT 53000-01 – Italian Seminar – This is Italy Four Masterpieces in Contest
TR 11:00-12:15
C. 
Moevs
Four masterpieces in four genres (short story, play, opera, film) from four centuries (medieval, Renaissance, Romantic, modern), in their historical / cultural context. While exploring these works and research methods across this span, you develop your own research project / paper on anything Italian, from any era. Required for anyone writing an ROIT Senior or Honors Thesis, but open to anyone who meets the prerequisite. Taught in Italian, but Italian Studies majors or Minors have the option of writing in English. Pre-requisite: two 30000 or 40000 level courses taught in Italian. Counts as a Lit-Culture course; required for the Lit-Culture Major or Supplementary Major.

 

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