Courses

Fall 2017 - Italian Graduate Courses

Subject to change. Please refer to InsideND for the most up-to-date, accurate information.

ROIT 63010-01 -  Introduction to Advance Studies in Italian
TBD
C. Moevs, S. Ferri, T. Cachey, Z. Baranski, and V. Montemaggi

A two-semester course, meeting one hour a week, co-taught by all the Italian T&R faculty. The course will ensure a solid foundation in the precise analysis of literary texts and other cultural artifacts in the context of Italian Studies, including a survey of metrics, rhetorical figures, narrative techniques, and film analysis. It will also provide an introduction to key terms and forms of critical and literary theory, and develop the skills necessary to pursue advanced independent research projects, including familiarity with bibliographic resources and research methods. During the course of the year students will also review a university-level manual/anthology of Italian literature. Required in their first year of all Master’s and Doctoral candidates specializing in Italian. Passing the final exam of this course is a prerequisite for continuing studies in Italian.

ROIT 63090-01 – History of Italian Language
M 3:30-6:15
T. Cachey

An advanced introduction to the history of the Italian language from Le origini to the High Renaissance with special emphasis on Dante, Petrarch, and Boccaccio during the medieval period and Bembo, Castiglione, and Machiavelli for the Renaissance.  Cross-listed with MI 63550.

ROIT 63952-01 – PIER PAOLO PASOLINI: LIFE AS ART AND COMMITMENT
TR 3:30-4:40
Z. Baranski

Pier Paolo Pasolini (1922-1975) is almost certainly Italy's major post-war intellectual and artist, whose work ranged widely across different media, literary forms and genres. In addition, for much of his career, Pasolini saw himself as engaging both with contemporary events and debates and with the preceding artistic and intellectual tradition. This hugely ambitious endeavour, beyond its clear public aims, also had complex private goals. Thus, Pasolini considered his oeuvre as a monument to himself. Commitment for Pasolini was both something energetically social and intimately personal. The course aims to assess Pasolini's complex, confusing and contradictory career in light both of post-war Italian culture and of major contemporary international cultural and political developments. In particular, the course will focus on a selection of his poetry, his narrative, critical, theoretical and "political" prose, and his cinema.               

Spring 2017 - Italian Graduate Courses

Subject to change. Please refer to InsideND for the most up-to-date, accurate information.

ROIT 63113-01- Dante's World of Books
TR 2:20-4:45p
Z. Baranski

“Dante’s World of Books” aims to examine the oeuvre and career of, arguably, the most original and influential writer in Western culture from three closely interlinked perspectives. First, the course provides an overview of all Dante’s writings, the books he actually produced. Second, it explores his intellectual formation and his attitude towards the literary tradition—the books that were probably present in his ‘library’. Third, it will assess the manner in which Dante synthesized his different ideological and poetic interests in order to develop an incisive and powerful assessment and critique of humanity’s position in the order of divine creation. In the Middle Ages, the created universe was often metaphorically described as “God’s book” or the “book of creation”. The course thus attempts to investigate the complex inter-relationship that Dante forged between his books and the ‘book’ of the Supreme Artist, a popular and highly influential medieval image for God the Creator. 
Crosslists MI 60558 ENG 90269 THEO 63205 

ROIT 63116-01- Dante II
TR 11:00am-12:15pm
C. Moev

Dante's Comedy is one of the supreme poetic achievements in Western literature. It is a probing synthesis of the entire Western cultural and philosophical tradition that produced it, a radical experiment in poetics and poetic technique, and a profound exploration of Christian spirituality.  Dante I and Dante II are an in-depth study, over two semesters, of the entire Comedy, in its historical, philosophical and literary context.   Dante I focuses on the Inferno and the works that precede the Comedy (Vita Nova, Convivio, De vulgari eloquentia); Dante II focuses on the Purgatorio and Paradiso, along with the Monarchia.  Students may take just one of Dante I and II or both, in either order.   Lectures and discussion in English; the text will be read in a facing-page translation, so we can refer to the Italian (but knowledge of Italian is not necessary).  Counts as an Italian Studies course.  Students with Italian have the option of also enrolling in a one-credit pass/fail Languages Across the Curriculum section, which will meet one hour per week to read and discuss selected passages or cantos in Italian.   NOTE:  the one-semester lecture course ROIT 40114, Dante’s Divine Comedy: The Christian Universe as Poetry, is often offered in place of Dante I. LIT - Univ. Req. Literature. Cross-listed with LLRO 40116, MI 40553,MI 60553 ROIT 40116

ROIT 63955-01- Manzoni
TR 2:00-3:15pm
C. Moevs 

Alessandro Manzoni's Promessi Sposi is an enduring classic, one of the great novels of nineteenth century Europe.  Its importance in forging the cultural, literary, and linguistic identity of the emerging Italian nation is rivaled only by Dante'sComedy.  In this seminar we will read the Promessi Sposi in its historical and cultural context (the tension and fusion between enlightenment and romantic ideals at the threshold of the Italian nation-state), paying special attention to the work's artistic, social, and religious aims as a novel at once historical, political, and self-consciously Catholic.  We will alsolook at Manzoni’s other works (the other redactions of the Promessi Sposi, the poems, plays, and essays) to try to form a complete picture of Manzoni’s intellectual, cultural, religious itinerary in relation to his time.  The readings will be in Italian, and the course will require student presentations and a research paper.

Fall 2016 - Italian Graduate Courses

Subject to change. Please refer to InsideND for the most up-to-date, accurate information.

ROIT 63010 – Introduction to Advanced Studies in Italian
TBD
C. Moevs, J. Welle, Z. Baranski

A two-semester course, meeting one hour a week, co-taught by all the Italian T&R faculty. The course will ensure a solid foundation in the precise analysis of literary texts and other cultural artifacts in the context of Italian Studies, including a survey of metrics, rhetorical figures, narrative techniques, and film analysis. It will also provide an introduction to key terms and forms of critical and literary theory, and develop the skills necessary to pursue advanced independent research projects, including familiarity with bibliographic resources and research methods. During the course of the year students will also review a university-level manual/anthology of Italian literature. Required in their first year of all Master’s and Doctoral candidates specializing in Italian. Passing the final exam of this course is a prerequisite for continuing studies in Italian.

ROIT 63253 – Leon Battista Alberti and the Italian Renaissance
TR 3:30-4:45
M. McLaughlin

Leon Battista Alberti (1404-72) is one of the most well-known figures of the Italian Renaissance. His extraordinary range of abilities as a writer, architect, art theorist and even athlete earned him the title of the first Renaissance or Universal man, according to Jacob Burckhardt in his influential work, The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy (1860). Naturally Burckhardt’s categories have been seriously contested over the last 150 years and interest in Alberti has risen enormously recently (the secondary bibliography has increased exponentially in the last 50 years). This course will deal with major problematic concepts such as Renaissance and Humanism as well as exploring the controversial figure of Alberti. The key works to be studied are his autobiography (Vita), his dialogue on the family (I libri della famiglia) and his treatises on painting (Della pittura) and architecture (De re aedificatoria). The course will be taught in English.  

ROIT 63510 – Film and Literature in Italy
W 3:30-6:15pm
J. Welle

This course examines one of the key dynamics of the twentieth century in Italy: the interactions between film and literature. Three interrelated phenomena will be analyzed: 1) the interactions with, and contributions to, cinema and film culture by literary writers, 2) films based on literary texts, and 3) the influence of film on literature. From pre-cinematic media such as the magic lantern and the illustrated book in the nineteenth century to the emergence of digital forms of cinema and new media technologies in the 1990s, Italian writers react to the moving image and take part in shaping both its development and its cultural reception. Along the way, Italian writers produce a rich body of “cinema literature": interviews and articles, criticism, theoretical interventions, and manifestos, as well as poems, short stories, novels, and plays that demonstrate the impact of cinema on literature. In sum, the relationship between film and literature in Italy sheds light on literary history, on the history of cinema, on the history of intellectuals and media, and on cultural history more broadly. In addition to weekly films, and the preparation of readings, assignments will include 1) class presentations of articles, films and readings, 2) leading class discussions, 3) a research presentation, 4) a research paper. CL LIT 73981

top