Courses

Fall 2017-  Iberian and Latin American Undergraduate Courses

Subject to change. Please refer to InsideND for the most up-to-date, accurate information. 

Portuguese

ROPO 10103-01 – Brazilian Portuguese Languages & Culture I
MWF 10:30-11:20
M. Bahia

This beginning Portuguese hybrid course combines the traditional classroom format with online instruction. This course introduces students to contemporary Brazilian and Lusophone cultures through film, music, news media and internet resources. Along with the Acquisition of language skills, ROPO 10103 emphasizes the active use of written and spoken Portuguese in context. Meets three times in the classroom plus online requirements.  Cross-listed with ROPO 67001.

ROPO 10105-01 – Portuguese for Spanish Speakers I
MWF 2:00-2:50
S. Teixeira

This course sequence is designed for students with at least intermediate-level proficiency in Spanish. Classroom activities emphasize the acquisition of basic language structures, vocabulary, and sound systems, as well as the active use of spoken language in context. Students are introduced to the diverse cultures of the Portuguese-speaking countries through current video, printed media, music, and short fiction. This sequence is followed by ROPO 20201 or ROPO 20202. ROPO 10105 - 10106 and either ROPO 20201 or ROPO 20202 together fulfill the language requirement.

ROPO 10112-01 – Intensive Portuguese for Professional Purposes
MWF 11:30-12:20/TR 11:00-12:15
S. Teixeira

Designed for highly motivated students, this intensive beginning language course, along with the acquisition of language skills, emphasizes the active use of written and spoken Portuguese for professional purposes in context. This intensive course is followed by ROPO 20201, and together they fulfill the language requirement and will prepare the students for the study abroad program.


ROPO 20201-02 Intermediate Portuguese I
MWF 12:50-1:40
S. Teixeira

Through selected readings in Portuguese, Brazilian, and Lusophone African literatures, films, newspaper and magazine articles, and popular music, students discuss a variety of cultural issues and expand their vocabulary. Particular attention is placed on reviewing major topics in Portuguese grammar and on developing students' writing abilities. ROPO 20201 fulfills the language requirement and prepares students to study abroad in Brazil.

ROPO 30812-01 – Brazilian Literature: Modernism and Cultural Anthropophagy
MW 12:30-1:45
M. Bahia

 In this course, students will focus on the development of Brazilian Modernism in the 20th Century through the analysis of masterpieces by world renowned authors such Clarice Lispector and Jorge Amado. Furthermore, we will explore the thought-provoking concept of “Cultural Anthropophagy” in works by leading Brazilian modernists such as Mário deAndrade and Oswald de Andrade. OFFERED IN PORTUGUESE  

ROPO 40952-01 – The Giant of the South: Brazil in the 21st Century
MW 2:00-3:15
M. Bahia

What are the new challenges for the Brazilian democracy and human development post-impeachment?  What are the current issues in race, religion, class, gender and politics that are shaping the present and the future of the Giant of the South?  (offered in English) Cross-listed with LLRO 40952, AFST 40579, and GSC 40520.

Spanish

ROSP 20450-01 - Spanish for Business
MWF 10:30-11:20
I. Menes
This course is designed to give students with intermediate-advanced levels of proficiency in Spanish a solid foundation in business vocabulary, cultural concepts, and situational practice that will help them prepare for success in today’s Spanish-speaking business world.  This class seeks to develop intercultural communicative competence for business purposes, such as an understanding of leadership, banking, real state, and ethics, among other topics.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to communicate completely in Spanish with Spanish-speaking co-workers, clients, employees, and costumers at the national and international level.

ROSP 20600 - Cultural Conversations & Writing (Various times and various instructors, see below)
This is an upper-intermediate cultural conversation and writing course designed to follow the four-semester language sequence and to act as a bridge to more advanced courses. In order to improve oral and writing language skills, this course engages students intellectually by using challenging, authentic materials and focusing on the exchange of ideas. Through the reading, discussion, and analysis of these materials, students will develop more sophisticated oral expression and expository writing as well as critical and abstract thinking skills. Being a content-driven course, topics could include, but are not limited to questions from the domains of politics, history, art, music, literature, film, religion, pop culture, etc. This course may be used as one of the two 20000-level electives for the Spanish major.

ROSP 20600 -01 - Cultural Conversations & Writing 
MWF 9:25-10:15
T. Botero

The primary focus of this class will be on film, short stories and plays from many of the great writers and producers of Latin America and Spain.  Additional complimentary materials will be used to highlight contemporary topics of history, art, politics, violence, social justice, and culture in general. The purpose of this course is to develop and increase proficiency and fluency of oral expression and expository writing, as well as the development of new, more complex sophisticated vocabulary. By the end of the semester you will be able to write and have conversations about a variety of intricate and more refined issues.                      

ROSP 20600-02 -Cultural Conversations & Writing 
MWF 9:25-10:15
M.Coloma

This course will use informative and thought-provoking films to focus on the history, art and culture of Latin America. Supplementary texts and articles will provide background historical events and analysis to enhance the understanding of the circumstances and themes that each of the films address. A comprehensive review of Spanish grammar will be provided. Also, activities that promote effective communication of abstract themes with high-intermediate use of grammatical structures will be emphasized. The goal of the course is to improve oral and written communication and the development of new, more complex, vocabulary.

ROSP 20600-03 - Cultural Conversations & Writing
MWF 10:30-11:20
M. Coloma

Same as section 2

ROSP 20600-04 - Cultural Conversations & Writing
MWF 11:30-12:20
E. Mangione-Lora

Más Allá de los Buenos Modales
This course explores part of the 90% of the cultural "iceberg" that lies below the surface of various Latin America cultures, especially Mexican culture in formal situations. We will use authentic texts, film and other media to strengthen our linguistic abilities and develop cultural competency. We will hone our skills in 4 writing genres: descriptive, narrative, argumentative and reflective. We will learn the do's and don'ts, and the historical, social, and cultural reasons for them. By the semester's end you will be comfortable having a spontaneous conversation about complex issues; you will have drafted an example of writing that you are proud of; you will have created an ePortfolio to showcase your work; and you will have learned a few basic steps of salsa, merengue and bachata..

ROSP 20600-05 - Cultural Conversations & Writing
MWF 11:30-12:20
M. Coloma

Same as section 2

ROSP 20600-06 - Cultural Conversations & Writing
MWF 11:30-12:20
A. Topash-Rios

A Cultural Mosaic: Perspectives on Contemporary Topics
In this course, contemporary readings and films will serve as texts to organize and inspire discussions on inter-societal themes including power, personality, human relationships, perceptions of reality, and more. In addition to readings and short films, there will be targeted vocabulary generation. The main goals of this course are advancement of oral and written proficiency, significant vocabulary acquisition, confidence-building, and cultural awareness.

ROSP 20600-7 - Cultural Conversations & Writing
MWF 12:50-1:40
E. Mangione-Lora

Same as section 4

ROSP 20600-08 
MWF 2:00-2:50
T. Botero

Same as section 1

ROSP 20810-01 – CBL: Language, Culture and Community
MW 2:00-315
M. Coloma

This fifth-semester language and culture course is designed for students who want to improve their communication skills in Spanish and broaden their understanding of the Hispanic world through connecting with the local Spanish speaking community. Each section may focus on different topics, such as health care, education, social services, history of immigration, and intercultural competence. The course has a required Community-Based-Learning component in which students engage with the Latino community through placements in such areas as health care, youth mentoring or tutoring programs, English as a New Language (ENL) classes, and facilitating educational workshops with parents. In this course, students integrate their service experiences with the academic components of the class through readings, research, reflective writing, and discussion.

ROSP 30017-01 -  Introduction to Translation and Interpreting, Theory and Practice
MW 2:00-3:15
E. Mangione-Lora

Students will explore translation theory, ethics, preparations, procedures and techniques by means of Monica Baker’s In Other Words: A Course Book on Translation. Together with an advanced language text to improve language skills, and selected readings to provide a strong preparation for meaningful interaction with their community partners, the course will provide real-world opportunities for application and feedback for the skills the students develop.  Students will be expected to work with the community partner for 10-12 hours per semester, which typically entails a visit once per week to the partner site.

ROSP 30310-01 – Introduction to Hispanic Literature and Cultures
MW 9:30-10:45
E. Juarez
ROSP 30310-02 – Introduction to Hispanic Literature and Cultures
MW 2:00-3:15
V. Miseres
ROSP 30310-03 – Introduction to Hispanic Literature and Cultures
TR 12:30-1:45
P. Uparel
ROSP 30310-04 – Introduction to Hispanic Literature and Cultures
MW 12:30-1:45
D. Jorza
ROSP 30310-05 – Introduction to Hispanic Literature and Cultures
TR 11:00-12:15
L. Bravo

This is an upper-division course for students with advanced preparation. It serves as the introduction to the analysis and explication of Spanish-language literary texts. Short texts in prose, poetry, and theatre from a variety of periods and countries within the Hispanic world are read, presented, and discussed. The course is a prerequisite for the survey courses, and must be completed by the end of the junior year.

ROSP 30320-01 – Advance Grammar and Writing
MWF 12:50-1:40

I. Menes
ROSP 30320-02 – Advance Grammar and Writing
MWF 2:00-2:50
I. Menes
This course is oriented towards students who have completed the intermediate level and thus want to refine their Spanish competence, as well as for those who wish to study abroad or who are returning from a program in a Spanish-speaking country.  The topics covered in this course include grammar, vocabulary and cultural subjects.  Reinforcement of the students’ linguistic development, conceptual accuracy and discursive ability will be emphasized in the use of academic Spanish. This course offers opportunities for students to correct, exercise and obtain confidence in their control of grammatical structures and formal and informal vocabulary.

ROSP 30571-01 – Cinema and Everyday Life in Postwar Spain
MW 11:00-12:15
D. Jorza

This cinematic survey of postwar Spain will analyze symptomatic representations of Spanish history and culture through the Spanish film production that was produced after the Civil War, during Franco’s long dictatorship (1939-1975). Some of the topics that will be explored in the course include the Spanish Civil War, censorship, national(ist) imaginaries, the modern city versus the traditional countryside, tourism, desarrollismo, violence, religion, love, family, and gender roles.

ROSP 30710-01 – Early Peninsular Lit and Culture
TR 12:30-1:45
E. Juarez

This course is a survey of Spanish literature from the medieval period through the 17th century. We will study representative works with a view to understanding the cultural, intellectual and historical forces that shaped the literary production of the period. Much emphasis will be placed on the thematic threads of the evolving literary creation of the Castilian hero and the notion of love in relation to diverse literary conventions. Works to be read include Poema de Mio Cid, El conde Lucanor, La Celestina, Lazarillo de Tormes, Renaissance and Baroque poetry (Garcilaso, Góngora y Quevedo), a play by Lope de Vega, and excerpts from Cervantes' Don Quixote. Active student participation is required. Lecturing will be kept to a minimum so as to allow more time for analysis and discussion of the texts. This course satisfies the early Spanish Peninsular requirement. Sophomore and junior majors only. Pre-requisite: ROSP 30310. Cross- listed with MI 30500.

ROSP 30717-01 Brains, Brawn, and Heart: Women in Medieval Iberian Literature
9:30-10:45
K. Oswald

This course will examine a panorama of vastly differing depictions of women in Medieval Iberia, in texts written almost exclusively by men. Through a selection of prose and verse from the 13th to 16th centuries, we will consider questions such as loyalty and betrayal, submission and rebellion, piety and blasphemy, and love and rejection.  Cross-listed with MI 30717.

ROSP 30817-01 -  Monstrous Latin America in the Early Modern Period
MW 8:00-9:15
S. Quintero

Both terrifying and fascinating, monsters help us reflect on society’s cultural fears and anxieties. Their bodies—hybrid, abnormal, alluring—serve as cultural signs encoding moral, ethical, political and religious issues for every epoch and culture. In particular, Monsters have always populated the imaginations of Latin America. From the flesh-eating savages with canine muzzles mentioned in the first colonial accounts of the “New World,” to representations of caudillos (Strong Men) as bloodthirsty vampires governing the newly born nation states, monstrosity has served as central metaphor to characterize Latin American identity.
In this course we will use/take monstrosity as a conceptual framework to analyze exemplary texts, trends, and authors from Latin American cultural history. The course will be divided in two parts. The first section will be centered on literary and cultural texts from Colonial times. Then, the second section will introduce modern texts and reinterpretations (literature, movies, graphic novels, performance art pieces) of the monsters under study. Overall, students will learn how representations of monsters and monstrosity have resonated with fundamental events in the region’s cultural history, including colonization, slavery, indigenous uprisings, nation formation, modernization, and Globalization, among others. This course can fufill either Early or Modern Latin-American Literature and Culture.

ROSP 30820-01 – Modern Latin-American Lit and Culture
MW 2:00-3:15
M. Olivera-Williams
ROSP 30820-02 – Modern Latin-American Lit and Culture
TR 12:30-1:45
M. Moreno

This course provides a panoramic survey of Spanish American literature from roughly 1880 to the present, with attention to principal literary trends and major cultural problems. To focus the course, we will be pursuing the problem of modernity as it emerges in the major movements and authors of the long twentieth century, tracing divergent responses to the complex and rapid changes – including industrialization, shifting gender roles, and the emergence of new media such as cinema – of the period. We will read essays, poetry, short stories, and a short novel by authors such as José Martí, Rubén Darío, Jorge Luis Borges, Juan Rulfo, Gabriel García Márquez, and others, with an eye towards understanding the social and historical contexts in which the works took shape. The course is designed to expose you to some of the region’s most celebrated and provocative works of literature, as well as help you understand the major challenges and promises Latin America faced during the modern period. It will also hone your skills in analyzing texts in Spanish, as we will practice close reading and argumentative analysis in various ways. Cross-listed with LAST 30401

ROSP 40234-01 - Power, Performance, and Self: Early Modern Spanish Culture and Society Through Literature         TR 2:00-3:15
E. Juarez

The objective of this course is to examine the specific ideology and cultural practices that characterized sixteenth and seventeenth century Spanish society through the reading of diverse representative literary texts. The course is organized around thematic clusters in order to explore major questions such as creation of identity, issues of gender and sexuality, honor and marital institutions, ethnic and class inequality, theatrical performance and religion and mysticism. Texts include picaresque novels, historical autobiographies, plays, short novels, mystical writings and a contemporary movie, Alatriste. In addition to literary texts, readings include complementary historical and critical documents.
 

ROSP 40726-01 – Gabriela Mistral and Her World
MW 3:30-4:45
M. Olivera-Williams

This course, designed as a seminar for upper-level Spanish students, will consider the poetry of Gabriela Mistral in its historical and cultural context, paying particular attention to the aesthetic evolution of her poetry and to its social and religious aims. Letters and other writings by the Chilean poet will also be discussed. The seminar will be conducted in Spanish.  Cross-listed LAST 40425              

ROSP 40773-01 – Cuban Literature, History, and Culture from the Late Colonial Period through the Cuban Revolution
TR 11:00-12:15
T. Anderson

This course will offer a panoramic view of Cuban literature written from the 1840s through the final decades of the 20th century.  In addition to close literary analysis of texts from various genres and by a wide variety or authors – such as Gertrudis Gómez de Avellaneda, José Martí, Nicolás Guillén, Alejo Carpentier, and Nancy Morejón – we will also study various aspects of Cuban history such as the legacy of slavery and the nature of the plantation economy, the quest for national identity, the far-reaching impacts of US intervention on the island, and the social, political, and moral consequences of the Cuban Revolution.

ROSP 40892-01 – Borders and Bridges
TR 11:00-12:15
M. Moreno

What is a border? Who inhabits the borderlands? What function does the border play in the construction of a national or cultural identity? How do we bridge communities? How are borders represented, established, and challenged in the works of US Latino/a writers? These are some of the questions that this course will address within the context of US Latino/a literature and culture. Most of the course will focus on two geographical areas that we tend to associate with these concepts: the traditional US-Mexico border and the lesser studied Caribbean. Students will watch films and read literary works by Mexican-American, Puerto Rican, Dominican-American and Cuban-American authors in order to gain a deeper understanding of how borders and borderlands inform contemporary discourse and culture. This course has a Community-Based Learning (CBL) requirement. Students are expected to sign up for tutoring at La Casa de Amistad once a week for 2 hours. The course will be taught in Spanish and is open to advanced non-majors. Cross-listed ILS 40909, ROSP 63892. PSIM attribute.

ROSP 53000-01 – Senior Seminar
TR 9:30-10:45
J. Vitulli
ROSP 53000-02 – Senior Seminar
MW 11:00-12:15
B. Heller

The Senior Research Seminar is the capstone experience for Spanish majors.  It requires students to draw on skills learned and refined in upper-level classes to create and write a sophisticated, unique research project.  It also requires students to follow the path of academic scholars in choosing a topic, finding appropriate resources (both primary and secondary sources), developing a methodology and an outline, reading sources critically, and writing and re-writing an extended paper.  The Senior Research Seminar has three goals. First, it is intended to introduce senior students to the most up-to-date trends in literary analysis and theory. Second, the course is structured in order to allow students to pursue sophisticated research in the field of Spanish and Latin American literatures and cultures.  Third, the Senior Research Seminar paper could be the basis for a Senior Thesis in order to graduate with distinction in Spanish. The seminar will be divided in two parts. During the first half of the semester, students will be able to know and reflect on a set of methodological and theoretical tools for investigation of cultural practices such as literature, critical theory, popular and mass culture, social movements, and institutions, etc. within the context of Spanish and Latin American social formations. The second half of the semester will be devoted to the composition of the Senior Research paper.

Spring 2017 - Iberian and Latin American Undergraduate Courses

Subject to change. Please refer to InsideND for the most up-to-date, accurate information. 

Portuguese

ROPO 20202- 01: Intermediate Portuguese II
MWF 12:50-1:40pm
S. Teixeira

This is a continuation of ROPO 20201 but it may be taken separately. ROPO 20202 is a fourth-semester language course designed to develop facility in speaking, reading, and writing at an advanced level. Discussions and writing assignments are based on films as well as on short stories, chronicles and newspaper articles.

ROPO 30810-01: Brazilian Literature in Dialogue with New Arts and Media.
MWF 12:50-1:40pm
M. Bahía

In this course, students will have a broad introduction to the masterpieces of Brazilian Literature, from colonial times to modernismo. Our corpus will include works by great masters such as Gregório de Matos, José de Alencar, Machado de Assis, Clarice Lispector, and Jorge Amado. Furthermore, the close reading of these texts will be enriched by the analysis of contemporary music, graphic novels, TV shows and movies that adapt, reshape, recycle and remediate Brazilian literary classics. Taught in Portuguese.

ROPO 40511-01: Introduction to Film Analysis through Brazilian Cinema.
MW 11:00am- 12:15pm
M. Bahía

Students will be able to improve their argumentative and analytical skills through the study of key issues and concepts in film studies. Film form and narrative, gender, class, stereotypes, the film auteur, cultural industry, violence and social denunciation will be some of the topics explored for the exploration of Brazilian case studies. Special emphasis will be given to the retomada –the rebirth of Brazilian cinema from the mid 1990s on – with in-depth analyses of feature films such as Carlota Joaquina (Carla Camurati, 1995), Central do Brasil (Walter Salles, 1998), CIdade de Deus (Fernando Meirelles, 2002) and Tropa de Elite (José Padilha, 2007); documentary movies such as Edifício Master (Eduardo Coutinho, 2002) and Santiago (João Moreira Salles, 2007) , as well as short movies such as Recife Frio (Kleber Mendonça Filho, 2009) and Eu não Quero Voltar Sozinho (Daniel Ribeiro, 2010). Taught in English. Crosslist FTT 40236

Spanish

ROSP 20460-01/02 – Spanish for Medical Profession
ROSP 20460-01: MWF 12:50-1:40
ROSP 20460-02: MWF 2:00-2:50
M. Coloma

This is an intermediate Spanish level course designed for students interested in any health profession. We will develop medical language skills and cultural competency for health care situations. The course will include practical terminology, a review of hospital settings, multimedia simulations, films, recorded doctor-patient interactions, and current medical events. Spanish is the only language of instruction.

ROSP 20600 - Cultural Conversations and Writing
MWF - Various Times

This is an upper-intermediate cultural conversation and writing course designed to follow the four-semester language sequence and to act as a bridge to more advanced courses. In order to improve oral and writing language skills, this course engages students intellectually by using challenging, authentic materials and focusing on the exchange of ideas. Through the reading, discussion, and analysis of these materials, students will develop more sophisticated oral expression and expository writing as well as critical and abstract thinking skills. Being a content-driven course, topics could include, but are not limited to questions from the domains of politics, history, art, music, literature, film, religion, pop culture, etc. This course may be used as one of the two 20000-level electives for the Spanish major.

    ROSP 20600 -  Cultural, Conversation, and Writing: Hispanic Culture Through Literature and Film
Section 01 (MWF 8:20-9:10am)
T. Botero

This course will use informative and thought-provoking films, short stories and plays from many of the great writers and producers to focus on contemporary history, art and culture of Latin America and Spain. Supplementary texts and articles will provide background to historical events and analysis to enhance the understanding of the circumstances and themes that are addressed. Activities that promote effective communication of abstract themes with high-intermediate use of grammatical structures  that will be emphasized. The goal of the course is to improve oral and written communication andproficiency. As well as the development of new, more complexsophisticated vocabulary. By the end of the semester you will be able to write and have conversations about complex issues.

•    ROSP 20600 - Cultural Conversation and Writing: Más Allá de los Buenos Modales
Sections 02 (MWF 11:30-12:20pm), 03 (MWF 12:50-1:40pm)
E. Mangione-Lora

This course explores part of the 90% of the cultural "iceberg" that lies below the surface of various Latin America cultures, especially Mexican business culture. We will use authentic texts, film and other media to strengthen our linguistic abilities and develop cultural competency. We will hone our skills in 4 writing genres: descriptive, narrative, argumentative and reflective. We will learn the do's and don'ts, and the historical, social, and cultural reasons for them. By the semester's end you will be comfortable having a spontaneous conversation about complex issues; you will have drafted an example of writing that you are proud of; you will have created an ePortfolio to showcase your work; and you will have learned a few basic steps of salsa,merengue and bachata.

•    ROSP 20600 - Cultural Conversation and Writing: Spain Today
Section 04 (MWF 10:30-11:20)
I. Menes

This course, designed for high intermediate, advanced undergraduates, and those returning from or travelling abroad, exposes students to the diversity of today's contemporary Spain. As an important goal, it will provide a comprehensive overview of the country's key historic events, visual arts, literature, and music, as well as its traditions and daily customs. In addition to expanding students' civilization and cultural knowledge, this course will develop their skills according to the five standards for foreign language learning. Accordingly, it will present new and current perspectives regarding Spain and its role in the European and international communities in this new millennium.  

•    ROSP 20600 -Cultural Conversation and Writing: Latin American Culture through Film
Sections 05 (MWF 10:30-11:20am), 06 (MWF 9:25-10:15am)
M. Coloma                      
                                             
This course will use informative and thought-provoking films to focus on the history, art and culture of Latin America. Supplementary texts and articles will provide background historical events and analysis to enhance the understanding of the circumstances and themes that each of the films address. A comprehensive review of Spanish grammar will be provided. Also, activities that promote effective communication of abstract themes with high-intermediate use of grammatical structures will be emphasized. The goal of the course is to improve oral and written communication and the development of new, more complex, vocabulary.

ROSP 20810-01: Community-Based Spanish: Language, Culture and Community: Immigration and the Construction of Memory
MW 2:00-3:15
T. Botero

This course has a required Community-Based-Learning (CBL) component in which students engage with the Latino community and will require weekly meetings outside of the classroom working with your community families assigned. An advanced-intermediate culture-based Spanish course, this class serves as a bridge course between our four-semester basic language courses and advanced classes on literature and culture. It is intended for Spanish majors and non-majors who can elect to take it after they have completed ROSP20202. Through literature, film, current events, and guest speakers, students will develop knowledge about migration issues, family immigration histories, and problems facing our Latino communities in general, and particularly in South Bend.  Students through ethical engagements will work on a collaborative creation and preservation of memory (memory of experiences that shape everyday life and the future). Together they will document the powerful narratives that not only shape memory but signal possibilities of what is to come. Using storytelling techniques, students will work with families to create and record the family histories using a variety of methods that will result in a couple of different pieces of work such as, recorded audio interviews using NPR’s technique of StoryCorps, every voice matters, and a collaborative book/scrapbook detailing their life and path that has lead them to our community. This course will help create spaces of solidarity and communication as legitimate points of departure for the politics of the future for both students and the community.  It is our hope to display final projects at Notre Dame’s Center for Arts and Culture in a cultural celebration. Crosslist ILS 20912

ROSP 20810-01: Community-Based Spanish: A Cultural Mosaic: Perspectives on Contemporary Topics
MW 2:00-3:15
A.Topash-Rios

In this course, contemporary essays, articles, poetry, short story and short films will serve as texts to organize and inspire discussions on inter-societal themes including power, personality, human relationships, perceptions of reality and more.  In addition to readings and short films, there will be review of targeted grammar topics.  The main goals of this course are advancement of oral and written proficiency, significant vocabulary acquisition, and confidence-building.  In addition, we will pave the way for literacy development for the children in the 4s room at El Campito Child Development Center as we move you, the Notre Dame student, forward in your second language skills and dispositions. Through your reflective assignments, you will describe how you are growing in your awareness of the connections between self, community and society, especially with regards to the challenges faced by El Campito families as they seek a better future for their children.  Crosslist ILS 20912

ROSP 30090-01: Atlantic History
MWF 11:30-12:20
M. Candido/K. Graubart

This course is a survey-style introduction to the early modern Atlantic world, the global region brought together beginning in the fifteenth century by commercial interests, military conquest, and the African slave trade. It explores the diverse relations between Europeans and Africans before that trade commenced, and examines how the Iberian conquest of the Americas radically transformed them.  It also examines the vast Atlantic diasporas: of Africans scattered around the American continents, of indigenous natives of the southern Americas to Europe and west-central Africa, and Europeans in Africa and the Americas.  Students will learn about the life experiences of the men and women who crossed the Atlantic, the effects of these conquests and trade relations on the regions, the development of theories of race, ethnicity, and gender that emerged, and the larger structures of global trade and contact in the early modern world    

ROSP 30101-01: Caribbean Diasporas
TR 3:30-4:45
K. Richman

This course examines the development of Creole societies in the French, Spanish, Dutch, and British Caribbean in response to colonialism, slavery, migration, nationalism and, most recently, transnationalism. The recent exodus of as much as 20 percent of Caribbean populations to North America and Europe has afforded the rise of new transnational modes of existence. This course will explore the consciousness and experience of Caribbean diasporas through ethnography and history, religion, literature, music, and culinary arts. Crosslist ILS30101

ROSP 30310-01/02/03/04/05 – Introduction to Hispanic Literature and Cultures
MWF 9:25-10:15, MW 2:00-3:15, TR 11:00-12:15, TR 2:00-3:45, MW 12:30-1:45
L. Francalanci, V. Miseres, E. Juarez, B. Heller, D. Jorza

This course is a practical introduction to the analysis and explication of Spanish-language literary texts. The course is designed for students ready to move from 200-level Spanish classes to upper-level literature and survey courses. The goal is to develop students' skills of critical reading, as well as students' ability to articulate judgments, feelings and opinions in Spanish; to establish a point of view and argue it effectively. The premise is that these skills of critical reading will increase the enjoyment and appreciation of fine writing. Some class sessions will be devoted to discussion of techniques and terminology of literary analysis. Most class sessions will involve a close reading and discussion of specific texts selected from the anthology Aproximaciones al estudio de la literatura hispánica, a selection of Hispanic prose, poetry and theater from different regions and periods. Students will also write two or three short analytical essays (3-4 pages) during the semester. Prerequisite: ROSP 20202, 20211, 2021, 20237, 27500 or equivalent. 

ROSP 30320-01/02 – Advanced Grammar and Writing
MWF 12:50-1:40, MWF 2:00-2:50
I.Menes

This course offers a further refinement of Spanish speaking and writing skills. It is designed for students already in the 30000-40000 sequence, or those placed by exam, who want to work on their writing skills, and for students planning to study abroad or those returning from abroad who wish to further improve their proficiency in Spanish. For further information see Undergraduate Coordinator. ROSP 30320 requires permission from the Assistant Chair. 

ROSP 30572-01-El extraño viaje: Cinema and (hi)story writing in postwar Spain
MW 11:00am-12:15pm
D. Jorza 

This course will examine emblematic film representations of postwar Spanish culture after the Civil War, during Franco’s long dictatorship (1939-1975), seeking to examine, on the one hand, how postwar culture has been viewed through various movies and related discourses and, on the other, to analyze how cinema actively contributed to shape particular images and meanings of Spanish culture, history and society. By analyzing this controversial Spanish film production, we shall attempt to answer numerous puzzling questions such as: what history/ies of Spain does Spanish cinema construct after the Civil War and how? Which Spain(s) are we talking about? How is an authoritarian regime changing its signs of identity? How can we assess the uneasy balance between tradition and modernity in a right-wing dictatorship? How do ordinary people cope with repression and harsh living conditions on a daily basis? How do audiences read a movie that was subject to censorship and propaganda? What is the relation between political censorship and cinematic creativity? Some other main topics that will be concurrently explored are: national(ist) imaginaries, the Spanish Civil War, the modern city versus the traditional countryside, tourism, violence, religion, love, family, and gender roles.

ROSP 30710 – Survey of Spanish Literature I
TR 3:30-4:45
D.  Seidenspinner-Núñez

This course is a survey of Spanish literature from the medieval period through the 17th century. We will study representative works with a view to understanding the cultural, intellectual and historical forces that shaped the literary production of the period. Much emphasis will be placed on the thematic threads of the evolving literary creation of the Castilian hero and the notion of love in relation to diverse literary conventions. Works to be read include Poema de Mio Cid, El conde Lucanor, La Celestina, Lazarillo de Tormes, Renaissance and Baroque poetry (Garcilaso, Góngora y Quevedo), a play by Lope de Vega, and excerpts from Cervantes' Don Quixote. Active student participation is required. Lecturing will be kept to a minimum so as to allow more time for analysis and discussion of the texts. Pre-requisite: ROSP 30310.Cross-listed with MI 30500. 

ROSP 30715 – Imagined Worlds: Now and Then
TR 12:30-1:45
J. Vitulli

Since its first uses in the Sixteenth Century, the term utopia meant both "good place" and "no place." Thus, the concept carried two different ideas in its own meaning, an ideal society and an unreachable one. In the past years, the concept—as well as its opposite, dystopia—has been applied to explain literary representations of imagined worlds that hold a mirror up to our own “real” world. Analyzing and discussing cultural products that create, depict, and represent invented societies is, without a doubt, a good path to understand and to critique key aspects of this complex world we live in today. Crosslist MI 30715

ROSP 30810-01: Early Latin American Literature and Culture
MW 9:30-10:45
C. Jauregui

This course provides a panoramic survey of Spanish American literature during the Colonial period, from the time of the first encounter (1492) through the 19th century. We will read from chronicles, autobiographies, short stories, travel accounts, as well as poetry and texts of indigenous peoples. We will complement our reading with the viewing of selected films set in the colonial period. Selections will be chosen from Náhuatl and Maya literature, Christopher Columbus, Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, Inca Garcilaso, Bernardo de Balbuena, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, and others. This course satisfies the early Spanish American requirement. Pre-requisite: ROSP 30310. Crosslisted with LAST 30401.

ROSP 30820-01/02 – Modern Latin-American Literature and Culture
MW 2:00-3:15, TR 11:00-12:15
M.R. Olivera-Williams/Thomas Anderson

This course provides a panoramic survey of Spanish American literature from roughly 1880 to the present, with attention to principal literary trends and concepts of literary analysis in Spanish. To focus the course, we will be pursuing the problem of modernity as it emerges in the major movements and authors of the long twentieth century, tracing divergent responses to the complex and rapid changes – including industrialization, shifting gender roles, and the emergence of new media such as cinema– of the period. And we will be particularly attuned to non-realist forms of literary expression, especially fantastic literature, as they reemerge consistently in the region throughout the “long” twentieth century and represent an important contribution of Latin American literature to world literature. We will read essays, poetry, short stories, and a short novel by authors such as José Martí, Rubén Darío, Jorge Luis Borges, Juan Rulfo, Rosario Ferré, and others, with an eye towards understanding the social and historical contexts in which the works took shape. The course is designed to expose you to some of the region’s most celebrated and provocative works of literature, as well as help you understand the major challenges and promises Latin America faced during its modern period. It will also hone your skills in analyzing texts in Spanish, as we will practice close reading through a variety of genres and styles. Crosslisted  LAST 30401

ROSP 40111-01- Convivencia, Conversion, and Inquisition
TR 12:30-1:45
D. Seidenspinner-Nuňez

While the High Middle Ages in Spain is marked by the celebrated "convivencia" of Christians, Muslims, and Jews, in the late Middle Ages, widespread pogroms, antijudaic legislation, theological disputations, and an aggressive proselytizing movement by the mendicant orders combined to produce a new minority in an already tricultural society - the conversos - whose problematic presence would dismantle the last vestiges of convivencia and usher in inquisition and ultimately expulsion. While the conversos are a persecuted minority, they also constitute the intellectual elite of 15th-century Spain and collude with the monarchy to engineer the emergence of Spain as a modern nation-state and world empire and the construction of an orthodox, patriarchal Spanish identity purified of its others: ethnic others through reconquest and expulsion, religious others through conversion and inquisition, and sexual others through misogyny and homophobia. Texts will include Poema de mio Cid; Los milagros de Nuestra Señora by Gonzalo de Berceo; Alfonso Martínez de Toledo's Arçipreste de Talavera; Juan de Mena, Laberinto de Fortuna; Jorge Manrique, "Coplas por la muerte de su padre"; Teresa de Cartagena, Admiraçión operum Dey; the Libro del Alborayque; Juan de Flores, Grisel y Mirabella; Diego de San Pedro, Cárcel de Amor; Fernando de Rojas, Celestina; and selections. Primary texts will be supplemented with critical, scholarly, cultural, and theoretical readings. Crosslisted MI 40512

ROSP 40231-01- Cervantes: Don Quijote
TR 11:00 -12:15
J. Vitulli

This course will center on a close reading and analysis of Don Quijote, with attention to the critical tradition of the novel and its role in the development of narrative fiction. We will also pay attention to the historical, social and cultural context of the work. Cervantes’s novel is arguably the most important text in Spanish literature, and it is worth the effort (and extremely enjoyable) to read. Students in the class will need to be prepared for a heavy reading load, up to 60 pages per class, 120 pages per week. No prior knowledge of Cervantes is necessary to take this course, but a solid knowledge of Spanish is required. Students in this seminar must participate actively in class discussions. There will be a reading assignment and a short writing exercise for each class. The texts will include the Thomas Lathrop edition of Don Quijote and selected critical essays. Attendance and participation will be fundamental components of the course. Evaluation will be based on class work and written exercises, two tests and a 12-page final paper. This course satisfies the early Spanish Peninsular literature requirement and/or 400-level elective. Crosslist MI 40504    

ROSP 40580-01 – Mexican Cinema 
TR 12:30-1:45
J. Lund

This course will introduce the student to modern Mexican film. The trajectory of the course covers a basic canon of essential works from the incipient years of Mexico's so-called "Golden Age" up until the present (roughly 1930 - 2015). Lecture and discussion will be driven by the aesthetic, cultural and political problems and themes invited by the films themselves, which will be the center of the course: no less than fifteen feature films will define our agenda for the semester. Alongside the films we will read two kinds of documents: on the one hand, a selection of film scholarship, dealing with both the specific films and the history of Mexican cinema more generally; on the other hand, a set of essays on Mexican cultural politics relevant to the themes engaged in the cinematic work. Comparative work is encouraged. Language of instruction: Spanish. Readings in Spanish and English, films generally in Spanish with English subtitles. 

ROSP 40764-01 - Jorge Luis Borges and the Unavoidable Option of Uncertainty
MW 2:00-3:15pm
C. Jáuregui

The goals of this class are twofold: 1) an introductory yet focused review of the literary work of renowned Argentine poet, essayist and writer of short stories Jorge Luis Borges (1899-1986); and 2) the literary interrogation of the limits of moral, religious, political, philosophical and scientific certainty through a critical survey of Borges’ work (poetry, essay and short story) and a study of the fluid relation of his writings with 20th century philosophy and cultural theory. We intend a debate on the crises, paradoxes, and dangers of certainty vis à vis Borges’ radical emphasis and corrosive poetics of indetermination; but rather than making an argument for nihilism or postmodern disenchantment we will study how Borges’ epistemological, metaphysical and philosophical “unavoidable option” of uncertainty may entail (and even uphold) a myriad of other ethical, religious, and political questions and options. This class has a weekly reading requirement of approximately 90-100 pages and writing requirement of 3-5 pages. Participation in class represents half of the final grade.

ROSP 40876-01:  Race and Ethnicity in US Latina/o Literature
TR 12:30-1:45pm
M. Moreno

If something has become clear following the 2012 termination of Mexican-American studies courses by the Tucson Unified School District (AZ) is that race and ethnicity matter when considering the condition of Latinos/as in the US.  In this course students will begin by examining the events related to the AZ law and will explore how these issues are played out in Latino literature and our local Latino community.  Literature by Afro-Latina/o, Andean-Latina/o (and other Latinos of indigenous descent), and Asian-Latina/o authors (including Chicano, Puerto Rican, Cuban-American, Dominican-American, Salvadoran-American, Guatemalan-American, and Peruvian-American) will provide a lens through which to explore the racial and ethnic complexities that are erased by the umbrella term “Latino.”  Tutoring/mentoring at La Casa de Amistad will provide an opportunity for students to see the issues studied at work in the “real world,” while also fostering stronger ties between Notre Dame and the South Bend community.  For the Community-Based Learning segment of the course, students will spend two hours per week working at Casa de Amistad.  This course will be conducted in Spanish.  Spanish heritage speakers are welcome. 
Crosslisted with AFST 43575, ILS 40910, and LAST 40428.

ROSP 40979-01- Culturas en Contacto: Translation and Hispanic Literatures
TR 11:00am-12:15pm
B. Heller

This course examines the issue of translation as it is raised by seminal texts in the Spanish and Latin American traditions. We will read short stories, poetry and essays from both Spain and Latin America (from Fray Luis de León and Garcilaso to Borges and Ferré,) that give us a window on processes of cultural contact and movement between cultures. The course will also give students practical experiences with translation, which will culminate in an end-of-semester project of original translations.   

ROSP 93763
R 4:30-6:00 pm
M. Rosa Olivera Williams

This seminar wants to realize, from the distinctive nature of the Catholic university, the call of philosopher Martha Nussbaum, who in 2010 underscored the importance of “[s]eeing how another group of intelligent beings cut up the world differently” (Not for Profit. Why Democracy Needs the Humanities 90). In 2010, Nussbaum responded to the crisis of the humanities demanding that “all students” learn “at least one foreign language well” in order to gain “an essential lesson in cultural humility” (90). Learning the language of the other is indeed opening a space for the other. It is inviting all languages in the widest sense of the word—methodologies, fields of studies, sciences, technologies, and, of course, different cultures—to address the problems of our present. It is opening the walls of the university to the outside, to the world. This opening is precisely what distinguishes the intellectual tradition of Catholicism. With the support of the Luksburg Foundation Collaboration Grants Program, two Catholic universities, the University of Notre Dame and the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, propose “memory studies” in the Latin American context as a point of critical inquiry with intrinsic value and value for society in the two Americas. Seminarians will discuss the following debates on corporate university: Frank Donahue’s The Last Professors: The Corporate University and the Fate of Humanities (2008), Cristopher Newfield’s Unmaking the Public University (2008), Martha Nussbaum’s Not for Profit. Why Democracy Needs the Humanities (2010), Bill Readings’s The University in Ruins (1997), Gary Rolfe’s The University in Dissent (2013), and on the idea of (Catholic) university: John McGreevy’s American Jesuits and the World: How an Embattled Religious Order Made Modern Catholicism Global (2016), Alasdair MacIntyre’s God, Philosophy, Universities (2009), Melanie Morey’s Catholic Higher Education: A Culture in Crisis (2006), John Newman’s The Idea of University (2016) and Paul Sullins and Anthony Blasi’s Catholic Social Thought (2009). This seminar will be conducted in Spanish.

Fall 2016 - Iberian and Latin American Undergraduate Courses

Subject to change. Please refer to InsideND for the most up-to-date, accurate information. 

Catalan

LLRO 10113 - Beginning Catalan 
MWF 10:30-11:20am & TR (CE)

This is a variable three or six-credit hybrid introductory language course, which combines traditional classroom with computer enhanced (CE) instruction. Students who sign up at the three-credit level attend class with an instructor (MWF); students who sign up at the six-credit level attend class with an instructor (MWF) and work individually on specifically designed computer-enhanced course materials (T-TH). The focus of the course is on a balanced approach to acquisition of all language skills –equal emphasis is placed on spoken and written Catalan– and appreciation of Catalan Culture reading, films, music, and class discussion. Combined with an advanced knowledge of Spanish or another Romance Language, Beginning Catalan can allow students to quickly develop reading skills for their research.  The study of Catalan language, culture and history is key to achieving a full understanding of Spanish-Catalan relations as well as the socio-cultural complexity of today’s Spain, and is highly recommended to students who want to enhance their knowledge of the Iberian Peninsula. Given the significant Catalan immigration to Latin America –particularly during the second part of the XIX and the first part of the XX centuries-, the study of Catalan language and culture can also provide students with a broader understanding of the history of countries such as Cuba, Argentina or Uruguay, among others. The interest of Catalan, however, is not limited to the field of Iberian or Hispanic studies: the study of its historic presence in the Mediterranean, as well as the current situation of Catalan within the European Community, in fact, can also promote a better knowledge of the multiplicity of political and linguistic identities present in contemporary Europe, giving students the chance to explore many different topics related to history, socio-linguistics, anthropology, art-history, literature, and beyond.

Portuguese

ROPO 20201 - Intermediate Portuguese I
MWF 11:30am-12:20pm & MWF 12:50-1:40pm
S. Teixeira

Through selected readings in Portuguese, Brazilian, and Lusophone African literatures, films, newspaper and magazine articles, and popular music, students discuss a variety of cultural issues and expand their vocabulary. Particular attention is placed on reviewing major topics in Portuguese grammar and on developing students' writing abilities. ROPO 20201 fulfills the language requirement and prepares students to study abroad in Brazil.

ROPO 30650 - Brazilian Pop Culture
In this course, students will strengthen their communicative skills by exploring authentic material from contemporary Brazilian Pop Culture. Movies, soap operas, music, sports, graphic novels and TV shows will be explored so that students develop their written and oral abilities through the vibrant and fascinating culture produced in Brazil. Taught in Portuguese.

ROPO 40950 - Brazil Beyond Soccer and Samba
200 million people, 47.3% of the South American territory, the largest economy in Latin America and the 7th in the world, host of the 2016 Olympic Games. Brazil is a South American Giant that needs to be understood by any specialist in the region, from language to business, from culture to international relations. In this course, students will explore the historical, economical and cultural conditions of Brazil during its military dictatorship (1964-1985), its redemocratization in the 1980s, its rise as a regional and global power in the 2000s, as well as the current political and economic crisis that grips the country. Taught in English. CROSS LIST with LLRO 40950.

Quechua

LLRO 10111 - Beginning Quechua
MWF 8:20-9:10am & TR (CE)

Join the millions of Quechua speakers in South America and around the world. Quechua was the official language of the Inca civilization and continues to be spoken by over 10 million people in six countries in South America today. Beyond its conventional rural environment, Quechua has expanded almost everywhere in our modern world. This course includes basic aspects of the Andean cultures as part of the Quechua instruction. We will explore Quechua stories from ancient and recent times as well as its development in the digital world. Students will acquire elementary knowledge and use of Quechua for everyday interaction. This course can be taken as a six-credit hybrid introductory language course, which combines traditional classroom with on-line instruction. Students attend class with a Quechua native instructor (MWF) and work on-line (T-TH). Or it can also be taken as a three credit regular course with MWF instruction format. The instructor will balance both spoken and written Quechua as well as exercise reading and listening. Knowledge of Spanish is desirable but not required.Cross listed with LAST 10502. 

Spanish

ROSP 20450 - Spanish for Business
MWF 10:30-11:20am
I. Menes

This course is designed for the student who wants to learn and study Spanish terminology, phrases, and cultural conventions used in business situations in Spain and Latin America.

ROSP 20600 - Cultural Conversations and Writing
MWF - Various Times

This is an upper-intermediate cultural conversation and writing course designed to follow the four-semester language sequence and to act as a bridge to more advanced courses. In order to improve oral and writing language skills, this course engages students intellectually by using challenging, authentic materials and focusing on the exchange of ideas. Through the reading, discussion, and analysis of these materials, students will develop more sophisticated oral expression and expository writing as well as critical and abstract thinking skills. Being a content-driven course, topics could include, but are not limited to questions from the domains of politics, history, art, music, literature, film, religion, pop culture, etc. This course may be used as one of the two 20000-level electives for the Spanish major.

  • ROSP 20600 - Cultural Conversation and Writing: Más Allá de los Buenos Modales
    Sections 01 (MWF 9:25-10:15am), 06 (MWF 11:30am-12:20pm), and 08 (MWF 12:50-1:40pm)
    E. Mangione-Lora

    This course explores part of the 90% of the cultural "iceberg" that lies below the surface of various Latin America cultures, especially Mexican business culture. We will use authentic texts, film and other media to strengthen our linguistic abilities and develop cultural competency. We will hone our skills in 4 writing genres: descriptive, narrative, argumentative and reflective. We will learn the do's and don'ts, and the historical, social, and cultural reasons for them. By the semester's end you will be comfortable having a spontaneous conversation about complex issues; you will have drafted an example of writing that you are proud of; you will have created an ePortfolio to showcase your work; and you will have learned a few basic steps of salsa,merengue and bachata.
     
  • ROSP 20600 - Cultural Conversation and Writing: Latin American Culture through Film
    Sections 02 (MWF 9:25-10:15am), 03 (MWF 10:30-11:20am), and 05 (MWF 11:30am-12:20pm)                            
    M. Coloma  
                                                                     
    This course will use informative and thought-provoking films to focus on the history, art and culture of Latin America. Supplementary texts and articles will provide background historical events and analysis to enhance the understanding of the circumstances and themes that each of the films address. A comprehensive review of Spanish grammar will be provided. Also, activities that promote effective communication of abstract themes with high-intermediate use of grammatical structures will be emphasized. The goal of the course is to improve oral and written communication and the development of new, more complex, vocabulary.
     
  • ROSP 20600 - Cultural Conversation and Writing: A Cultural Mosaic: Perspectives on Contemporary Topics 
    Sections 04 (MWF 11:30am-12:20pm), 07 (MWF 12:50-1:40pm), and 09 (MWF 2:00-2:50pm)
    A. Topash-Rios

    In this course, contemporary essays, articles, poetry, short story and short films will serve as texts to organize and inspire discussions on inter-societal themes including power, personality, human relationships, perceptions of reality and more.  In addition to readings and short films, there will be review of targeted grammar topics.  The main goals of this course are advancement of oral and written proficiency, significant vocabulary acquisition, and confidence-building.
     
  • ROSP 20600-10 - Cultural, Conversation, and Writing: Hispanic Culture Through Literature and Film
    MWF 2:00-2:50
    T. Botero

    This course will use informative and thought-provoking films, short stories and plays from many of the great writers and producers to focus on contemporary history, art and culture of Latin America and Spain. Supplementary texts and articles will provide background to historical events and analysis to enhance the understanding of the circumstances and themes that are addressed. Activities that promote effective communication of abstract themes with high-intermediate use of grammatical structures will be emphasized. The goal of the course is to improve oral and written communication and the development of new, more complex, vocabulary.

ROSP 20810 - CBL: Language, Culture and Community 
MW 2:00-3:15pm
M. Coloma

This fifth-semester language and culture course is designed for students who want to improve their communication skills in Spanish and broaden their understanding of the Hispanic world through connecting with the local Spanish speaking community. Each section may focus on different topics, such as health care, education, social services, history of immigration, and intercultural competence. The course has a required Community-Based-Learning component in which students engage with the Latino community through placements in such areas as health care, youth mentoring or tutoring programs, English as a New Language (ENL) classes, and facilitating educational workshops with parents. In this course, students integrate their service experiences with the academic components of the class through readings, research, reflective writing, and discussion. 

ROSP 30051 – CBL:  Once Upon a Time - Children’s Literature and Community Connections
MW 2:00-3:15pm
R. Parroquin

Students will be introduced to Literatura Infantil y Juvenil (LIJ) in the Spanish-speaking world through a combination of considerable reading of LIJ across genres and levels and a critical perspective of LIJ via academic text and articles.  Authors will include prolific writers of LIJ like Alma Flor Ada, as well as widely known writers like Cortázar, Paz, Pérez Revérte, Poniatowska, and Vargas LLosa who have also begun writing children’s books. Among genres read will be folklore, narrative, fiction (contemporary, realistic, historical, multicultural), fantasy, short story, poetry, and non-fiction.  Students will also learn about various LIJ book awards and their evolution over time.  In addition, students will develop criteria for evaluating quality LIJ.  Finally, there is a Community-Based Learning (CBL) component where students will share LIJ with the local Latino community through CBL projects and/or a reading program with Latino youth.   Pre-requiste: ROSP 20202 or above or placement by exam.  This course can count as an advanced elective towards the major.

ROSP 30310 - Introduction to Hispanic Literature and Culture 
Various Times

This is an upper-division course for students with advanced preparation. It serves as the introduction to the analysis and explication of Spanish-language literary texts. Short texts in prose, poetry, and theatre from a variety of periods and countries within the Hispanic world are read, presented, and discussed. The course is a prerequisite for the survey courses, and must be completed by the end of the junior year.  

ROSP 30320 - Advanced Grammar & Writing 
MWF 12:50-1:40pm & MWF 2:00-2:50pm
I. Menes

A further refinement of Spanish speaking and writing skills, this course is designed for students returning from abroad who wish to improve their proficiency in Spanish, and for students already in upper division- courses who seek additional assistance with writing skills and grammar.

ROSP 30571 – Hay un camino a la derecha: Cinema and everyday life in postwar Spain
MW 11:00am-12:15pm
D. Jorza 

This cinematic survey of postwar Spain will analyze symptomatic representations of Spanish history and culture through the Spanish film production that was produced after the Civil War, during Franco’s long dictatorship (1939-1975). Some of the topics that will be explored in the course include the Spanish Civil War, censorship, national(ist) imaginaries, the modern city versus the traditional countryside, tourism, desarrollismo, violence, religion, love, family, and gender roles.

ROSP 30710 – Early Peninsular Lit and Culture
TR 12:30-1:45pm
E. Juarez-Alemendros

This course is a survey of Spanish literature from the medieval period through the 17th century. We will study representative works with a view to understanding the cultural, intellectual and historical forces that shaped the literary production of the period. Much emphasis will be placed on the thematic threads of the evolving literary creation of the Castilian hero and the notion of love in relation to diverse literary conventions. Works to be read include Poema de Mio Cid, El conde Lucanor, La Celestina, Lazarillo de Tormes, Renaissance and Baroque poetry (Garcilaso, Góngora y Quevedo), a play by Lope de Vega, and excerpts from Cervantes' Don Quixote. Active student participation is required. Lecturing will be kept to a minimum so as to allow more time for analysis and discussion of the texts. This course satisfies the early Spanish Peninsular requirement. Sophomore and junior majors only. Pre-requisite: ROSP 30310. Cross- listed with MI 30500. 

ROSP 30712 – “Courtiers, Dames, Rogues, Soldiers and the Others in Imperial Spain”
TR 3:30-4:45pm
E. Juárez-Almendros

This course is an introduction to the history, society and literature of Early Modern Spain. Students will learn about the major historical developments that gave rise to the creation of Imperial Spain from 1492 through the fading of the initial impetus by the end of seventeenth century. Through the reading of selected representative works we will discuss how different literary figures project the ostentation of the haughty aristocracy, the poverty of the vast population, the gender inequality, the oppression of converted Jews and moors, and the relation to the American colonies.  

ROSP 30715 – Imagined Worlds: Now and Then
TR 12:30-1:45pm
J. Vitulli

Since its first uses in the Sixteenth Century, the term utopia meant both "good place" and "no place." Thus, the concept carried two different ideas in its own meaning, an ideal society and an unreachable one. In the past years, the concept—as well as its opposite, dystopia—has been applied to explain literary representations of imagined worlds that hold a mirror up to our own “real” world. Analyzing and discussing cultural products that create, depict, and represent invented societies is, without a doubt, a good path to understand and to critique key aspects of this complex world we live in today. 

ROSP 30722 – Catalan Literature and Culture
TR 3:30-4:45pm
L. Francalanci

This course aims to provide students with an introduction to the major authors, works, and trends in Catalan literature from the medieval period to the 21th century. We will be reading representative work from such vibrant cities as Barcelona and Valencia, as well as the Balearic Islands, and other Catalan speaking territories. The study of Catalan literature represents a dynamic and unique opportunity for Spanish Majors to enhance their knowledge of the Iberian Peninsula, and to foment a better understanding of the cultural and linguistic reality of today’s Spain. While learning about Catalan literature and culture students will also have the opportunity to explore a wide array of topics, such as history, socio-linguistics, culture, and identity politics. This course will place special emphasis on the relationship between Catalan and Spanish literary traditions from the Middle Ages to the present. No previous knowledge of Catalan language is required: Spanish will be the language of class instruction and readings. Primary and secondary sources will be complemented with the use of films and other audiovisual materials

ROSP 30810 – Early Latin-American Literature. “The Invention of America”
MW 12:30-1:45pm
V. Miseres

This course is designed to give students a wide scope of readings from colonial times to the 19th century that have shaped Latin America’s social, cultural and literary history.

The main focus of the course is Latin America’s redefinition of itself, its societies and diverse national identities. Departing from Edmundo O’Gorman’s assertion that America was not discovered but invented, we will explore the multiple and diverse definitions of the continent in literary and cultural expressions. We will problematize terms like “Nuevo Mundo”, “América”, “Americano” and “Latin America” from different perspectives that include the first Spanish cronistas, foreign travelers, and Creole intellectuals from several countries, including the voices of women authors that have been traditionally underrepresented in Latin American history. Students will be able to compare literary genres (chronicles, essays, short stories); analyze individual texts, films, and artistic works using appropriate terminology; and engage critically in questions about Latin America’s colonial legacy and nation-building. As we discuss the course material from colonial, independence and post-independence periods, we will also make connections to more current issues about Latin American history, politics, human rights, social activism, and gender roles.

ROSP 30811 - History of Colonial Latin America
MW 2:00-3:15pm
K. Graubart

When Columbus stepped ashore in the Caribbean in 1492, he set in motion a process that led to the creation of wealthy Spanish and Portuguese empires in the Americas, the genocide of countless numbers of indigenous men and women, the enslavement of millions of African men and women, and the eventual formation of a variety of independent states competing in the world economy. In this semester-long survey, we will examine topics in this history that will allow us to consider how history is produced as well as what happened in the past, from various perspectives, from elite colonial administrators and merchants to indigenous peasants and formerly enslaved men and women. CROSS LIST with HIST 30901 & LLRO 30811

ROSP 30820 – Modern Latin-American Lit and Culture
MW 2:00-3:15pm
M.R. Olivera Williams

This course provides a panoramic survey of Spanish American literature from roughly 1880 to the present, with attention to principal literary trends and major cultural problems. To focus the course, we will be pursuing the problem of modernity as it emerges in the major movements and authors of the long twentieth century, tracing divergent responses to the complex and rapid changes – including industrialization, shifting gender roles, and the emergence of new media such as cinema – of the period. We will read essays, poetry, short stories, and a short novel by authors such as José Martí, Rubén Darío, Jorge Luis Borges, Juan Rulfo, Gabriel García Márquez, and others, with an eye towards understanding the social and historical contexts in which the works took shape. The course is designed to expose you to some of the region’s most celebrated and provocative works of literature, as well as help you understand the major challenges and promises Latin America faced during the modern period. It will also hone your skills in analyzing texts in Spanish, as we will practice close reading and argumentative analysis in various ways. 

ROSP 30825 – Relatos del crimen, memoria e identidad en Latino America 
TR 11:00am-2:15pm
B. Heller

The crime narrative, a large category that includes the mystery novel, detective fiction, testimonial, and other subgenres, is often thought of as a minor genre limited by its formulas. It may be entertaining, but it isn’t “serious” fiction. This course pays serious attention to the genre and its development in Latin America from its origins in the late 19th century to today, focusing on the issues of memory and identity. The goal is to see what these narratives can tell us about the societies they represent, the traumas and conflicts they dramatize, and the losses and mysteries that attend them.

ROSP 40456 – Stories and Histories of Spanish Modernity 
MW 12:30-1:45pm
D. Jorza

This course will explore different representation of Spanish modernity in conjunction with relevant theoretical essays, seeking to examine on the one hand, how Spanish modernity has been viewed through various cultural products and, on the other, to analyze how different cultural representations contributed to shape particular images and meanings of Spain and it modernity.

ROSP 40733-01 – LATIN AMERICAN WOMEN’S BOOM
MW 3:30-4:45pm
M.R. Olivera-Williams

This upper-level seminar will analyze the explosion of women’s fiction in Latin America in the twentieth century. Making reference to the Latin American boom (the works of Julio Cortázar, José Donoso, Gabriel García Márquez, Carlos Fuentes, Guillermo Cabrera Infante, and Mario Vargas Llosa) and especially to María Pilar Donoso’s supplement to her husband’s (José Donoso) 1985 edition of Personal History of the Boom, entitled “El boom doméstico” (The Domestic Boom), we will investigate the silenced works of important women authors such as María Luisa Bombal’s La última niebla and La amortajada (The House in the Mist and The Shrouded Woman), and Armonía Somers’s La mujer desnuda (The Naked Woman), which were important contributions for the authors of the boom. With this literary framework, we will focus on the boom of Latin American women authors from the decade of the 1980s, in the midst of political violence, social changes, unprecedented censorship and repression, exile and disappearances. Using an interdisciplinary and comparative approach (literary criticism, cultural and feminist theories, ethics, philosophy), we will study works by Isabel Allende, Elena Poniatowska, Cristina Peri Rossi, Marta Traba, Rosario Ferré, Laura Esquivel, Ángeles Mastretta and Diamela Eltit to analyze the creation of the female body as a zone of impacts and affects that enables to know the world and the differences between the cosmopolitan desires of the male authors of the boom to be citizens of the lettered city and the authors of the Latin American women’s boom, who became forced citizens in the globalized world dominated by the free market and the neo-liberal economy. The seminar will be conducted in Spanish.  Cross- listed with LAST.

ROSP 40737 – One Hundred Years of Solitude
MW 9:30-10:45pm
J. Lund

This course is dedicated to a semester-long study of a masterpiece of narrative fiction in anticipation of its 50th anniversary: Gabriel Garcia Marquez's _One Hundred Years of Solitude_ (1967).  Through careful and systematic reading, our discussions will move in two directions: On the one hand, toward the ways in which the central themes of the text--including but not limited to love, family, war, nation, science, travel, narrative, and writing itself--both illuminate and are illuminated by questions central to Western philosophy.  On the other hand, the way in which the novel negotiates its own specific context--Western culture, the Americas, Latin America, Colombia--and how it confronts us to rethink that context.  At the end of the course, besides having experienced one of the great artworks of the modern age, you should feel that your perspective on the world has been altered, at least a little.  Taught in Spanish.

ROSP 40892 – Borders and Bridges: US Latino/a Literary and Cultural Production
TR 11:00am-12:15pm
M. Moreno

What is a border? Who inhabits the borderlands? What function does the border play in the construction of a national or cultural identity? How do we bridge communities? How are borders represented, established, and challenged in the works of US Latino/a writers? These are some of the questions that this course will address within the context of US Latino/a literature and culture. Most of the course will focus on two geographical areas that we tend to associate with these concepts: the traditional US-Mexico border and the lesser studied Caribbean. Students will watch films and read literary works by Mexican-American, Puerto Rican, Dominican-American and Cuban-American authors in order to gain a deeper understanding of how borders and borderlands inform contemporary discourse and culture. This course has a Community-Based Learning (CBL) requirement. Students are expected to sign up for tutoring at La Casa de Amistad once a week for 2 hours. The course will be taught in Spanish and is open to advanced non-majors. Cross-listed with ILS, Africana Studies. Carries the PSIM attribute. 

ROSP 40908 – “Men with Guns: Cultures of Paramilitarism and the Modern Americas”
MW 11:00am-12:15pm
J. Lund

What is paramilitarism? What is its relation to the political and ideological formation of the modern world? And what is its historical role in forging a basic cultural politics of the Americas? This course pursues these questions, and problematizes possible answers, along three methodological lines.  First we will read and discuss a short corpus that will introduce us to some of the conceptual work implied by paramilitarism, namely by focusing on the political-philosophical problems that reside at the center of paramilitary practice: the quadrangular relation between sovereign right, violent force, political space and free-market democracy.  Second, we will read a selection of case studies from various disciplines—e.g. literature, history, anthropology, sociology, political philosophy etc—that deal with aspects of the history of paramilitarism in the Americas.  Finally, the students will take charge of the course by introducing the ways in which paramilitary discourse inhabits their own work.  Language of instruction: Spanish.  Readings: English and Spanish.

ROSP 53000 SENIOR SEMINAR
TR 9:30-10:45am 
J. Vitulli

The Senior Research Seminar is the capstone experience for Spanish majors.  It requires students to draw on skills learned and refined in upper-level classes to create and write a sophisticated, unique research project.  It also requires students to follow the path of academic scholars in choosing a topic, finding appropriate resources (both primary and secondary sources), developing a methodology and an outline, reading sources critically, and writing and re-writing an extended paper.  The Senior Research Seminar has three goals. First, it is intended to introduce senior students to the most up-to-date trends in literary analysis and theory. Second, the course is structured in order to allow students to pursue sophisticated research in the field of Spanish and Latin American literatures and cultures.  Third, the Senior Research Seminar paper could be the basis for a Senior Thesis in order to graduate with distinction in Spanish. The seminar will be divided in two parts. During the first half of the semester, students will be able to know and reflect on a set of methodological and theoretical tools for investigation of cultural practices such as literature, critical theory, popular and mass culture, social movements, and institutions, etc. within the context of Spanish and Latin American social formations. The second half of the semester will be devoted to the composition of the Senior Research paper.

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