Courses

Fall 2017 French Undergraduate Courses

Subject to change. Please refer to InsideND for the most up-to-date, accurate information.

ROFR 20300-01 - Conversational French
MWF 2:00-2:50

K. Werner
This course is designed to further develop the student's conversational skills by viewing and discussing a number of recent French films. There will also be a variety  of classroom activities aimed at practicing extemporaneous speaking in everyday social situations. There will be no formal review of grammar, but there will be a series of short tests over the vocabulary and themes associated with each film.  The final project will be a collaborative video based upon the films viewed throughout the semester. 

ROFR 20603-01 – Facets of France, French and the French
TR 9:30-10:45
L. MacKenzie

This content-driven course is intended for students who want for further broaden their knowledge of the French language and related cultures, as well as improve both their understanding of the French and Francophone world and their communication skills in the French Language.

ROFR 20692-01 – “La Beurgeoisie’: Race, Class, and Sex in France Today”
MW 2:00-3:15
A. Rice

This course focuses on contemporary French-language books and films that evoke second-generation immigrants from Algeria and Morocco in France today. We pay special attention to questions of gender, religion, and identity and examine depictions of young men and women from impoverished backgrounds who have managed to climb the social ladder in France in various professions to gain notoriety and respect. Cross-listed with GSC 20524.

ROFR 30310-01 – The Art Interpretation
TR 9:30-10:45
A. Toumayan

Through careful study of selected short excerpts, this course will focus on the identification and resolution of specific problems of textual analysis and interpretation. Prose and verse texts representing various periods, movements, and genres, and selected to highlight a specific problem of reading, will be analyzed following the technique of close reading or explication-de-texte. The course normally includes the analysis of visual art (a session at the Snite museum) and the analysis of a film.

ROFR 30320-01 – Advance Composition: Art of Writing (Department approval required)
MW 12:30-1:45
TBD

This advanced-level course, taught in French, is designed for students including those returning from abroad who wish to improve their speaking and writing skills and for students already in the 30000-40000 sequence who seek additional assistance with writing skills and grammar.

ROFR 30360-01 - French Translation
TR 11:00-12:15
TBD 

This French translation course is divided into units focusing on different types of translation (literary, journalistic, academic, commercial, technical, legal, film subtitling, interpretation, etc.). We will work on both French to English (version) and English to French (thème) translations, and will learn different translation strategies while focusing on building vocabulary and improving French grammar.
Course materials will include: newspaper and magazine articles; Alain Schifres’s study of the rise of “franglais” entitled My Tailor is rich but my français is poor (2014); a short novel, Naissance des fantômes (1998), by Marie Darrieussecq, as well as its translation, My Phantom Husband; the Tumblr blog “les sous-titres de la honte”; and a documentary by stand-up comedian Gad Elmaleh, 10 minutes in America (2014), which addresses the challenges of translating humor and cultural references.

ROFR 30710-01 – Overview of French Lit & Culture I
MW 11:00-12:15
Fr. G. Haake

This course is designed as an introduction to French literature and culture of the Middle Ages, Renaissance, and Classical periods. Rather than focus exclusively on a series of small excerpts from the periods in question, students will be asked to read and analyze several texts in their entirety—or nearly so—that are exemplary of the three main eras under study. This approach will not preclude smaller excerpts from other texts that will supplement the students’ understanding of the literature and culture of this time. In addition, students will have a chance to hone their skills in literary analysis through exposure to literary commonplaces, rhetorical figures, and versification, as well as through the practice of explication de texte. As a final component, students will have the opportunity to develop their cultural literacy of the respective periods through lectures and presentations on art, architecture, music, history, and politics. Texts and authors will include La Chanson de Roland, Villon, Rabelais, Ronsard, Molière, Corneille, and others. Cross-listed with MI 30530.

ROFR 40213-01 – Women in Print
MW 2:00-3:15
Fr. G. Haake

With the advent of the print medium, the barriers to women writers and poets in Renaissance France were seemingly lower. What distinguishes the woman writer in this new era of the printed word? What characterizes their rhetoric, style, and subject matter? In our own time, how have contemporary literary critics both questioned and affirmed their legacy? Through close reading and study of writers such as Marguerite de Navarre, Pernette du Guillet, Louise Labé, and others, while taking into account the male perspective from poets such as Scève and Ronsard, students will examine the role of women in print in sixteenth-century France.

ROFR 40453-01 – Money Matters in French Literature
T 3:30-6:15
J. Douthwaite

The course introduces students to French literature and history from the late 17th century to the late 19th century in historical context. Building on Professor Douthwaite’s current book project, "Financiers We Have Known: A Capitalist History of French Literature," the seminar will expose students to cutting-edge methodologies for studying literature alongside economic theory on human motivation by Shiller, Chang, and Frey. It will focus on fiction that explicitly portrays money and its impact on human life, as seen in transactions, inheritances, credit, charity, and commerce, among other phenomena. Authors to be studied include: La Fontaine, Perrault, Montesquieu, Voltaire, Diderot, Mouhy, Balzac, Hugo, and Zola. Format: advanced seminar with background lectures and well-guided discussions. Cross-listed with ROFR 63490.

ROFR 40654-01 – Cultures of Fear: France and the US in 2016-2017
TR 12:30-1:45
O. Morel

In France and the US, 2015 & 2016 have been marked by major social changes that have impacted the political landscapes and cultures. While reflecting on the long history of the French-US relationship, we will focus on three markers of the post-9/11 & post-Charlie Hebdo/Bataclan world: discourses of inclusion and exclusion (politics); reconfigurations of race, class and gender (society); digital fluidity (media). We will study the election cycles from 2016 (US) and 2017 (France) and pay attention to cultural (cinema, comics, theatre, literature…) and activist responses. Our main objective for the course consists of a refining a concept of “fear.” We will attempt to discern how fear plays a significant role as a driving force in history in general, and in politics today. We will try to understand how this notion has changed since 9/11, both conceptually, and as a central human emotion. We will welcome guests on Skype: authors, filmmakers. Two written assignments, oral presentations as well as active participation in our class will constitute the basic requirements.

Spring 2017 French Undergraduate Courses

Subject to change. Please refer to InsideND for the most up-to-date, accurate information.

ROFR 20300 - Conversational French
MWF 10:30-11:20 and 11:30-12:20
A. Reaves

This course is designed to further develop the student's conversational skills and grasp of a wide variety of styles and registers in French. Spoken French will be practiced through various types of classroom activities and assignments. Emphasis will be on topics of current interest.  

ROFR 20691-01- French Fictions: Diversity in Literature and Film
MW 11:00am-12:15pm
A. Rice

This course focuses on the diversity of people from around the world who speak French today. It features short stories, plays, and personal essays by writers such as Nathacha Appanah (Mauritius), Maïssa Bey (Algeria), Fatou Diome (Senegal), Nancy Huston (Canada) Alain Mabanckou (Congo), and Brina Svit (Slovenia), as well as films that illustrate to what extent what is considered to be “French” in our time is constantly evolving, thanks to a variety of cultural and linguistic changes that reflect a globalized world. Students will be encouraged to engage in creative writing in this course, composing their own “French fictions” that reveal their own relationships to all things French.

ROFR 21205-01- Angers: Atelier Préparatoire
TR 7:00-8:15
G. Haake

What you need to know to flourish in Angers or Paris while you're studying there, and how to build lasting ties to France for the future. A six-week, 1.0 credit preparation for studies at all of Notre Dame's three international study programs in France: at Angers (Université Catholique de l'Ouest) and in Paris (for students going to the Institut d'études politiques or the Université Paris Diderot). A course packet will form the core of the course, and lectures by faculty in ROFR and other departments will shine light on diverse aspects of French culture, history, and current events. Course will be taught primarily in English, and feature student-centered discussions and ample opportunity for Q&A. Enrollment will take place after students have been selected for the programs. Course will begin meeting one week after Spring break.

ROFR 30310 – The Art of Interpretation
MW 9:30-10:45am
G. Haake

The aim of this course is to familiarize students with interpreting texts of various genres and periods. By texts, we may understand not only works of literature such as poetry, prose or theater, but also images, film clips, songs, or advertisements. This course will give special attention to the French technique of explication de texte, a close reading and analysis of a short text. Because students will learn to do both oral and written interpretations, or explications, increasing facility in correct written and spoken French will be a significant benefit of this course.
Requirements: Students will do two oral explications and are expected to participate actively in class discussions. In addition to the oral explications in class, there will be two written analyses (3-5 p.) done in two drafts each, and a final exam. Additional work includes daily written preparation questions concerning vocabulary or allusions pertinent to the assigned text of the day.

ROFR 30320-01- Advanced Grammar & Composition: The Art of Writing
MW 3:30-4:45pm
A. Haileselassie

This advanced-level course, taught in French, is designed for students including those returning from abroad who wish to improve their speaking and writing skills and for students already in the 30000-40000 sequence who seek additional assistance with writing skills and grammar.

ROFR 30652-01- French Tensions Today: Graphic Novels (“BD”) between journalism, cinema, and literature
TR 2:00-3:15pm
O. Morel

Whether it is non-fiction graphic novels or traditional comics, the French and Francophone “bande dessinée” is extremely popular with a strong economic sector, a fast growing adult audience and a crucial influence on the public sphere. While cartoonists were targeted in January 2015, many graphic novels describe a difficult present. While focusing on very recent examples, this course’s goal not only consists of studying contemporary graphic novels in French, but also meet with young authors of the French scene with a special interest on intersections with literature, journalism and cinema. During the past few years French graphic novels have also led to very successful cinematic adaptations like Quai D’Orsay (Lanzac-Blain/Tavernier, 2014), Lulu Femme Nue (Davodeau/Anspach, 2013) or the renowned La Vie d’Adèle (Maroh/Kechiche, 2013) which won the Palme d’Or in the Cannes Film Festival in 2013. Other explicitly focus on the current xenophobic and cultural tensions.  
We will have opportunities to meet “real” authors on Skype: Maël & Kris (Notre Mère la Guerre, 2010-2012), for example. We will pay a special attention on how these “BD” perceive and depict today’s world, from France’s relationship to its former colonies, to social issues, forgotten wars, poverty or immigration, and even intellectual debates. While always starting our investigation with a graphic novel, we will study a number of literary texts, historical periods, the news, cinematic fictions, etc. Two written assignments, oral presentations as well as active participation in our class will constitute the basic requirements.

ROFR 30710 – Overview of French Literature & Culture I
MW 12:30-1:45
G. Haake

This course is designed as an introduction to French literature and culture of the Middle Ages, Renaissance, and Classical periods. Students will primarily read and analyze several texts in their entirety—or nearly so—that are exemplary of the three main eras under study. This approach will not preclude smaller excerpts from other texts that will supplement the students’ understanding of the literature and culture of this time. In addition, students will have a chance to hone their skills in literary analysis through exposure to literary commonplaces, rhetorical figures, and versification, as well as through the classic French practice of explication de texte. As a final component, students will have the opportunity to develop their cultural literacy of the respective periods through lectures and presentations on art, architecture, music, history, and politics. Texts and authors will include La Chanson de Roland, Villon, Rabelais, Ronsard, Molière, Corneille, and others. 

ROFR 33500-01 "La Chanson française"
W 7:00-8:15 
A.Toumayan
M. Aloia

This course proposes to study French culture through the examination of French popular, folk, and traditional songs from the medieval period to the modern era. Songs of various periods, regions, and genres will be studied as well as the relation of folk and popular songs to other cultural forms such as poetry, short story, cinema, or opera. 

ROFR 40150- Imaginary Landscapes
TR 11:00am-12:15pm
M. Boulton

The course will examine landscapes, both real and imagined, that inspired French writers from the middle ages to the twentieth century, and from both sides of the Atlantic.  Literary texts will be placed in dialogue with artists' visions of the places that inspired the texts. Among the texts and authors to be read will be the Roman de la Rose (extracts), DuBellay (Les Antiquités de Rome), Diderot (Le Voyage de Bougainville), George Sand (La Mare au Diable), Gabrielle Roy (Détresse et enchantement, La montagne secrète), Robert de Roquebrune (Testament de mon enfance). Artists will include Claude Lorrain, Gauguin, Corot, and Cézanne.

ROFR 40635- "Phantasmes et Fantastique":  La Nouvelle au Dix-Neuvième Siècle.
TR 12:30-1:45pm
A.Toumayan

This course will focus on the development of the genre of short narrative during the nineteenth century in France.  Representative works of Balzac, Nerval, Baudelaire, Barbey d'Aurevilly, Flaubert, Gautier, Mérimée, Maupassant, and Villiers de l'Isle Adam will be considered.  The themes of obsession, trauma and madness will compose common motifs in the corpus of texts that we will examine.  We will also study the distinctive features of the aesthetics of Romanticism, Realism and Symbolism as well as generic considerations relating to the conte fantastique. Course requirements include one oral presentation, two papers of moderate length and a final exam.

ROFR 53000-01- Senior Seminar Spring: Mediterranean Francophonies: Migration, Translation & Music
MW 2:00-3:15pm
A. Rice

In the current context of transcontinental migration, movements from one location to another have spurred writers and musicians to adapt to their new surroundings by becoming skillful at composing in another key. The result is a variety of new Euro-Mediterranean literary and musical Francophonies enriched by translations. This course will focus on the ways in which writers and musicians, key transcultural agents in twenty-first-century patterns of cultural encounters and exchanges, negotiate and translate identities, belongings and experiences, effectively transposing French language and culture. We will read works by Tahar Ben Jelloun, Fabienne Kanor, Marie NDiaye, and Boualem Sansal, among others, and study musical compositions and cinematic works that depict various Mediterranean movements that are presently leading to a variety of new forms of French.

Fall 2016 - French Undergraduate Courses

Subject to change. Please refer to inside ND for the most up-to-date, accurate information. 

ROFR 20300 - Conversational French
MWF 2:00-2:50pm
TBD

This course is designed to further develop the student's conversational skills and grasp of a wide variety of styles and registers in French. Spoken French will be practiced through various types of classroom activities and assignments. Emphasis will be on topics of current interest.  

ROFR 20602-01, -02 - Exploring Diversity in France
TBD
What is diversity?  We think of the United States as a ‘melting pot’, but what about France?  This course will examine the regional, ethnic, cultural and linguistic diversity of France, looking at a wide group of regional and ethnic minority groups, as well as domestic immigrant communities.  We will discuss the relevant historical context, as well as consider traditions, film, music, food, linguistic variation and current events to arrive at a more diverse picture of ‘French-ness’ and compare this with perceptions of ‘diversity’ and ‘multiculturalism’ in the United States.

ROFR 30310 – The Art of Interpretation
TR 9:30-10:45am
A.Toumayan

Through careful study of selected short excerpts, this course will focus on the identification and resolution of specific problems of textual analysis and interpretation.  Prose and verse texts representing various periods, movements, and genres, and selected to highlight a specific problem of reading, will be analyzed following the technique of close reading or explication-de-texte. The course normally includes the analysis of visual art (a session at the Snite museum) and the analysis of a film.

ROFR 30320 – Advanced Composition: Art of Writing
MW 12:30-1:45pm
Fr. Greg Haake

This advanced-level course, taught in French, is designed for students including those returning from abroad who wish to improve their speaking and writing skills and for students already in the 30000-40000 sequence who seek additional assistance with writing skills and grammar.

ROFR 30655: “Le Selfie”: Francophone Autobiographical Literature, Film & Music
MW 2:00-3:15pm
A.Rice

In this course, we will examine contemporary depictions of the self in various forms, ranging from literary texts to cinematic creations to musical compositions. We will study the works of such authors as Maryse Condé and Amélie Nothomb alongside films by Abd Al Malik and Marjane Satrapi as well as lyrics and video clips by MC Solaar and Stromae, among others, in an effort to determine how individuals perceive themselves and create public perceptions of their personae through these various forms of self-expression.

ROFR 30720 – Overview of French Lit and Culture II
TR 11:00am-12:15pm
A.Toumayan

Reading of selections and complete works of outstanding French authors from major genres and periods. All majors are required to take this sequence, or equivalent advanced courses. Students are expected to have already taken 30310 or to take ROFR 30310 concurrently with the first survey taken. Cross-listed with GS 30578-01.

ROFR 40343 – Classical French Theater
TR 9:30-10:45am
L. MacKenzie

Louis 14 (and to a lesser extent, Louis 13) may have been king, but theater ruled 17th Century France; and the “kings” of the theater were Corneille, Racine and Molière.  More than 300 years later, the works of these three are still read, performed and cherished. We will continue this momentum. Our approach will be based on detailed readings, critical observation and “mise en scène,” that is, performing certain scenes from the plays.  Class conducted in French.

LLRO 40595 - New Trends in European Nonfiction Films
TR 3:30-4:45pm
O. Morel

This class will present an overview of the most recent trends in nonfiction films directed and produced in a globalized Europe. One of our goals will consist of analyzing how non-fiction cinema is transforming both the news and traditional fiction cinema. We will also reflect on the political importance of non-fiction filmmaking in conflict situations and in the context of the dramatic political tensions affecting Europe today (terrorism, wars, refugee crises, the rise of far right parties, economic crisis?). We will study new forms of non-fiction cinema: animation, webdocs, 3-D, augmented reality, as well as the changes in the economy of the sector.We will welcome guests on Skype: authors, filmmakers, producers. Two written assignments, oral presentations as well as active participation in our class will consistute the basic requirements.

ROFR 40652-01 – “Ethnicity and Terror in Today’s Digital France: Journalism, Cinema, Graphic Novels
TR 2:00-3:15pm
O. Morel

The goal of this class is to analyze three spheres of cultural representation and the explanations that were given for the terrorist attacks that took place in France in 2015 (notably the Charlie Hebdo and Hyper Cacher, the Thalys attack, and the November 13 attacks). While we focus on A) media reactions to the attacks B) art (films, graphic novels, notably) C) how the French society reacted to the attacks, we will also try to understand the importance of the digital sphere, not only in circulating information but also in shaping violence.

ROFR 40906-01/LLRO – French Literature and Opera
TR 12:30-1:45pm
L. MacKenzie

In this course, the full title of which is Taking Liberties: From Book to Libretto, or French Literature Goes to the Opera and which is taught in ENGLISH, we will be looking a series of parent texts, written originally in French, and their operatic offspring. Works include The Barber of Seville (Beaumarchais/Rossini); The Marriage of Figaro (Beaumarchais/Mozart); Don Juan (Molière) and Don Giovanni (Mozart); Manon Lescaut (Prévost/Puccini), Carmen (Mérimée/Bizet).

Graduate

ROFR 63223 – Renaissance Lyric Poetry
M 3:30-6:15pm
G. Haake

This course will constitute an in-depth examination of the French lyric tradition primarily during, but not limited to, the sixteenth century. Students will begin by exploring the Italian origins of the French tradition before tracing its development through the Rhétoriqueurs, the Ecole lyonnaise, the Pléiade, and beyond. Through a close analysis of primary literary texts and through an exposure to salient works of secondary literature, students will not only engage the poetry but also broader questions about imitation, originality, and meaning during a dynamic but somewhat unstable period of literary production.

ROFR 63854 – “En dehors des lignes”: Francophone Literature and Human Rights
W 3:30-6:15pm
A. Rice

This course focuses on the role performed by literature in creating empathy and promoting human rights. It also explores the ways in which certain Francophone writers who are attentive to questions of justice and reparation within their oeuvre are deeply engaged in activism outside their textual creations as well. This devotion to effecting change, outside the lines of the literary work and beyond national boundaries, represents a commitment that is specific to our time. We will read works by Maïssa Bey (Algeria), Yanick Lahens (Haiti), Shumona Sinha (India), and Abdourahman Waberi (Djibouti), among others.

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